Anthony Tjajadi: Indonesia Market Insights, Trihill Capital Investment Thesis & Venture Capitalist VC Tradecraft - 366

· Indonesia,VC and Angels,Podcast Episodes

“Be prepared to make mistakes because it will take some time for you to know where your risk appetite is, which is very important to identify because, for every investor, it’s different. You should not compare yourself to others because what you feel good about isn’t necessarily the same for others. So, experiment and make mistakes as much and as fast as you can. By doing that, you would be able to figure out what kind of investor you want to be. Once you’re to identify that, you’d be able to have a more targeted approach in your investment, the kind of companies that you’d want to go for, and what kind of team you’d be able to supplement your goal.” - Anthony Tjajadi

“If we talk about Southeast Asia, there are various markets. Most people know Indonesia to be a large, young, and growing middle-class population, but in reality, what companies can sell or what consumers can buy may not be as appealing as it may sound on a macro level. There are various limiting factors such as the political landscape. You need a strong grounding for you to understand and scale in the market. The second one is the supply chain. The distribution network is still in the early phase of development, especially in Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities. In the US, what we’ve seen as a VC’s job is to identify and accelerate innovations, but in this part of the business, in this part of the region, pure tech business is rare. Instead, we see more tech-enabled traditional businesses that will have an easier time, especially generating customers and revenue. They are more likely to have healthy unit economics and capital efficiency.” - Anthony Tjajadi

“The first myth is that VCs must take control of your business. While we do have a say in some business decisions, especially if we hold a board position, we're not looking to take over your business and the day-to-day operations of the company. We provide oversight and guidance. We are your sounding board. We help with strategy and roadmaps, but it's more important for us to let the founders do the company building because that is the founder's job, not the VC. The second myth is more money equals more success. What we’ve seen in recent years, many companies that have raised hundreds of millions of dollars failed. Simply having a large amount of venture capital doesn't ensure a startup's success. Sometimes having too much funding can even lead to inefficient spending and a lack of focus. It’s the VC's job and responsibility to make sure that these founders don't detour too much.”- Anthony Tjajadi

Anthony Tjajadi, Founding Partner at Trihill Capital, and Jeremy Au talked about three main themes:

1. Indonesia Market Insights: Anthony discussed that the necessary qualities of successful Indonesian founders are hard work, being savvy at market dynamics and understanding of local political nuances, with examples in supply chain challenges and consumer behavior in Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities. He shared his assessment that while Indonesia boasts a large, young, and growing middle-class population, the potential for consumer spending are not as robust as macro indicators suggest.

2. Trihill Capital’s Investment Thesis: Anthony described Trihill Capital as a sector-agnostic, early-to-growth-stage VC that prefers investing in tech-enabled businesses. He talked about their focus on scalability, profitability, unit economics, and speed of growth when evaluating companies, as well as their approach to investing in public equities.

3. VC Tradecraft: Anthony advised about what VCs should look for in potential investments and how to navigate the Indonesian market in comparison to the US and China. He stressed the need for VCs to be extroverted and people-oriented, given the need for constant interaction with founders and other investors. He shared about the bold step he took in moving to Singapore to start the fund and advised aspiring venture capitalists to be prepared to make mistakes and understand their personal risk appetite.

Jeremy and Anthony also discussed the thesis behind investing in agritech, the necessity for founders to be fully aware of their market, and the importance of a strong support system for entrepreneurs.

Supported by Hive Health

Are you expanding or launching a business in the Philippines? Ensuring your employees' good health is key to attracting and retaining top talent. That's where Hive Health comes in, especially for startups and small to medium-sized businesses. They specialize in providing top-quality and hassle-free healthcare plans tailored to your workplace. Learn more at www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:49) Jeremy Au:

Hey, Anthony, really excited to have you in the show. You've been busy investing across the region and we'd love to hear your point of view. Anthony, please introduce yourself.

(01:57) Anthony Tjajadi:

Well, thanks for having me, Jeremy. I've been an audience in your podcast, so I thought that this is actually my first podcast that I'm going to be doing, and I just thought that you sounded familiar and I thought that it would be much easier to start my podcast experience with you. Yeah, my name is Anthony.

I'm part of Trihill Capital. We're an early to growth stage VC focusing in Southeast Asia, while we also invest in US, and China public equity. We have been around since 2018 and we're based out of Indonesia and Singapore. I come from a family business background, actually. We have been in the agriculture sector for the past 30 years. So I thought that I could diversify away and try something new. So in 2018, I decided to move to Singapore to start the fund. Why Singapore? I think because at the time, investments in both public and private were much more prominent than back home. And I've always had a deep interest in the consumer and technology sector.

But I've never really wanted to be a founder. So I saw a gap. I saw an opportunity to invest as a form of support and to foster innovation. So when we first started, we were investing across various different asset classes. We wanted to learn about ourselves. Our risk appetite and where our sweet spot would be. Until now, I think it is still a learning process for me and for the team. In the early phase of our investing, we also invested in venture capital funds. These were especially the early exposures that we had investing in startups, we were able to learn from some of the best investors in the region who were kind enough to share their knowledge and wisdom, which then led us to have the confidence to start our own. So we started investing directs in 2021. And here we are three years later.

(03:42) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. Could you share a little bit more about what you've learned about investing in Southeast Asia?

(03:47) Anthony Tjajadi:

If we talk about Southeast Asia, there are various different markets. I would speak mainly for Indonesia as a market because most people know Indonesia to be a large, young, and growing middle-class population. But I think in reality, what companies can actually sell or what consumers can actually buy, may not be as appealing as it may sound on a macro level. There are various limiting factors such as, first, politics. The political landscape is a big part. You need a strong grounding in order for you to understand and scale in the market. As you can see, we will be having our election next year. A lot of companies, especially the big ones, will not be making big decisions. I think they're trying to avoid big risk until the election period is over. I think, secondly, the supply chain. The distribution network is still in the early phase of development, especially in Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities. And I think in the US, what we have seen as a VC’s job is to identify an accelerated new innovation. But I think in this part of the business in this part of the region, pure tech business is rare. I think instead we see more tech-enabled traditional businesses that will probably have an easier time, especially generating customers and revenue, I think they are more likely to have healthy unit economics and capital efficiency.

But as we can see, also the ceiling to what it can grow is also limited. I think because of these issues, I think investors need to understand and adjust their target return, which also trickles into the entry valuation. So I think companies in Indonesia, especially in this new normal. I think they need to be able to find PMF earlier. Because in here, I think there's no such thing as like 500 to a thousand times return. The biggest tech company that we have in the region is GoTo, which is Gojek and Tokopedia, two leaders merged at less than 10 billion valuation. So at 1000 times return, you have got to invest in the company as early as 10 million dollar valuation and to prorate each round. And to me, this is just not a reasonable case.

(05:55) Jeremy Au:

And what's interesting is that you started comparing the US market from the Indonesian market. And I know that you have experience in not just venture capital, but also public equities as well, which gives you pretty good comparables across multiple asset classes. So how would you say the US and perhaps the China market differs from Indonesia?

(06:13) Anthony Tjajadi:

I think the US market is a much more developed market. I think most of the liquidity comes in the US. A lot of the early development will usually come in the US, but I think if we compare it with China or even Indonesia, there's a lot of copy and paste, but then to adapt, and localize it but as for China, it's a different market. I mean, if you ask me about China, three, four years ago, I'll probably say a different thing, but I think what we have seen in the past few years, China has been, I was going to say attacked, but they are experiencing a new kind of environment where the government has intervened in such a big way, which I think frightened a lot of new tech founders, especially what we have seen in the property market recently. And then a few years ago, it was the education market. So I think a lot of tech founders, in recent years, have started to question whether it's viable to start a company in China, or maybe they should just go abroad and start it in other countries.

(07:18) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. So when you are thinking about companies as a result, Indonesia, what type of companies are you looking for as a result? Are you looking for companies that are more consumer-oriented or business-oriented or is it something else you're looking for?

(07:30) Anthony Tjajadi:

So I think in general, at TriHill Capital, we are a sector agnostic. We look closer to the early stage, and we tend to prefer traditional businesses that are tech-enabled instead of pure tech businesses. I would say prefer, not a must completely, but I think the three most important traits that we look for in companies are scalability, profitability, which is unit economics, and the speed of growth. I think once the business model is right, then we look at the founding team. Are they strong enough to execute the three trades to succeed? And then, we ask ourselves, what is the competition? Can they penetrate and win? And when we believe that they do, we invest. Once we work with them, we tend to go very hands-on. We focus on fixing unit economics, and margins, or we would be helping to set strategic direction or even finding commercial partnerships. So those are some of the things that we would do.

(08:22) Jeremy Au:

Right. And when you meet a founder for the first time, what do you expect them to do or be like?

(08:27) Anthony Tjajadi:

So when I meet them, I would love to see a founder who is fully -prepared. I think even if you have not acted like you have done this a million times, just practice being direct. Who's your customer? How big is that market? Who are you competing with? What do you think is the AOV? How do you get to 10, 50, a hundred million dollar revenue? I feel like the math needs to be there. You should know your TAM. You should know your go-to market. Who are you starting with? Where are you going to go from there? In terms of the customer segment, be specific, who are they? What is small? What is big? What is the total revenue? What is the number of employees? If you are in the mid-market, what does that mean to be in your market? And I think lastly, why should we invest in you and why now? Because I think in this current climate where funding is scarce, the landscape is becoming more competitive and founders need to be ready at all times.

(09:15) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And as you see these founders what are some signals or red flags for founders who are not, you know, if you're not prepared, that's obvious, right? But when you talk about founders who are good, polished and prepared, what are the red flags or stories that you have about things that give you a signal that this is probably not a good investment to take at this time?

(09:34) Anthony Tjajadi:

I think when we look at founders, what makes the big difference for them is hard work and determination because, to me, this might not be a popular opinion, but if you are an aspiring founder, forget work-life balance. If you're at the C level in the company, the job scope is everything. Just because you're a CEO doesn't mean that you don't handle the CEO's job, or vice versa, because I think the role of a CEO changes as the company progresses, and changes in this industry are fast-paced. You need to constantly adapt and readjust to survive. And I think outside of work, it would be better if you can have a strong support system, whether it's your family or if it's your partner because they would be able to take care of the life outside of work, because if you overthink about what you're going to do the next weekend or like, where would you be flying for your next Christmas break? I think more than not, that will take quite a lot of your focus away from work. And with the level of unexpected and new problems that you will experience each day, I think you simply cannot be distracted because now you have people relying on you. And I think what's worse is when you're still burning, sometimes investors say yes, but they don't actually mean it. Sometimes they even sign, but still don't wire the fund. So I think you need to always be prepared with your plans B, C, and D.

(10:47) Jeremy Au:

And from your perspective, what does it take to be a successful founder?

(10:52) Anthony Tjajadi:

So I think, as I mentioned, I think those two traits are really important for me, which is hard work and determination. So I think when we meet a founder, we try as much as we can, as best as we can to analyze those two traits. Because of the diverse network that we have, we usually would have someone to cross-check about the person. So hopefully when we get good signals from others, especially on those two aspects I think it's usually a green light for us.

(11:24) Jeremy Au:

And starting to talk a little bit about Trihill in terms of your process, what makes Trihill different?

(11:28) Anthony Tjajadi:

So I think, first of all, we are an evergreen fund. So our main priority is the performance of our investments, and I think that directly comes from our founders and their businesses. Secondly, we also invest in public equities. We go bottom up in our research and a lot of the business models that we saw in the private space were more likely to happen in the public space way early. It might not be in the same country, but there must be something that is similar enough for us to study. Thirdly, we are a shareholder in one of the biggest banks in the country. We have done many partnerships with our portfolio companies, which helps them to grow faster into the next phase. Lastly, I think I would say that we are a team of operators. We come from different business backgrounds, consumer, retail, fintech, and construction, so I feel like we have experience starting a business or leading a team. And I think because of that, we often can relate and connect better with our founders.

(12:30) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. How have you gone about building Trihill Capital in terms of hiring new people building like your processes?

(12:36) Anthony Tjajadi:

So I think when we first started, I really know exactly how are we gonna grow, how big the team is going to be, but when I was trying to build the culture of Trihill Capital, capital, having a growth mindset is key. For each personnel, for our culture as a company, and I think the two most important drivers for us to be able to achieve this is the openness to criticism and the willingness to learn because I think if you have these two, nothing will stop you from growing. I think the VC landscape is so dynamic, and if you don't keep up, you will be left out. And specifically in my role to lead the team, I think I believe that if you look after the people, their growth and development, their dreams and their aspirations, they will simply put the same energy back to the business.

And I have a co-partner as well, and I've known him for a very long time. We have experienced ups and downs. I think what's important in working with a partner is to know exactly what your role is, and what you're good at. So with each problem or situation, sometimes you lead, and sometimes you follow. And I think knowing when to step in and when to step back is the yin and yang of the partnership and the whole team, I think.

(13:46) Jeremy Au:

What would you say are some common myths about startup investing in Indonesia?

(13:51) Anthony Tjajadi:

Okay, maybe two things. First, VCs must take control of your business. I think while we do have a say in some business decisions, especially if we hold a board position, well, we're not looking to take over your business, especially the day-to-day operations of the company. We provide oversight and guidance. We are your sounding board, we help with strategy and roadmaps, but I think it's more important for us to let the founders do the company building because I think that is the founder's job, not the VC.

Secondly, more money equals more success. I think what we have seen in recent years, many companies that have raised hundreds of millions of dollars have failed. So simply having a large amount of venture capital doesn't ensure a startup's success. Sometimes having too much funding can even lead to inefficient spending, a lack of focus. And I think it's the VC's job and responsibility to make sure that these founders don't detour too much.

(14:44) Jeremy Au: A

nd I think you mentioned is about the localization piece. So a lot of folks, have been trying to copy and paste something from the US or something from China to Indonesia. Sometimes it's worked out, sometimes it hasn't worked out. Can you share a little bit more about what you think is important to remember here?

(14:58) Anthony Tjajadi:

So I think localization, I mean, again, I would say like different business models would have different ways of localization. But I think having people on the ground is very important. If you're going to be investing in Indonesia or in Vietnam, let's say, your fund is based in Singapore. It's going to be hard, like even for me I've been living in Singapore for some time now. I grew up in Indonesia. I was raised in Indonesia. I spent most of my life in Indonesia, but in recent years, I've not been spending as much time in Indonesia. It's different. The speed of development is just so fast. And if you don't leave and breathe in the country, it's going to be hard for you to localize. And it's going to be hard for you to convince founders that, Oh, we will be able to help you. For me, it's going to be hard for you to be able to help a company or a founder that is doing their things in a different country, in a country that you have never lived before. So I think if you are serious about moving to or expanding your company regionally to another country, I think it's important for you to move your people there. Or even better you should go to those countries.

(16:06) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. One thing you mentioned was that you said that you're very focused on tech-enabled services rather than technology businesses. And it's quite interesting because a lot of VCs I know are actually the opposite, right? They're very much more focused on technology companies rather than technology-enabled services companies. So actually, now that I'm on reflection, I do think that this is actually quite a big difference. Can you share a little bit more about your thesis or hypothesis here?

(16:26) Anthony Tjajadi:

So I think because of our background with the team of having businesses background, I think we tend to be attracted to more traditional businesses that we can implement technology in it. I give you two examples. There's one company. It's just a brick-and-mortar tuition center in Singapore. He was one of your podcast speakers before. and so

(16:49) Jeremy Au:

Evan of Zenith Education?

(16:50) Anthony Tjajadi:

Yes, Evan. And when they first approached us, they only had a brick-and-mortar business. It's just your typical tuition center out of Singapore in the heartlands. But then, when they approached us, they said, Oh, I would want to implement a new strategy into the business. I would like to have a tech overlay in our business and we like that kind of business because I think with the brick-and-mortar business, there's already a real profit that is coming from the company. And then when they wanna do a tech overlay, if they wanna burn some money to develop themselves, to upgrade themselves, to differentiate themselves from the market we're in it. We would be very supportive of this kind of company. I think the other company that we have is a health and wellness company in Indonesia. It's just a brick-and-mortar gym business, but I think in order for them to differentiate themselves from the current offerings in the market, they only need to add simple tech into the operation. So let's say before they were in the market, there was nobody that was doing a sign-in by their phone. I mean, as simple as that, because we live with our smartphones all the time. And I think it's going to be so much easier.

It made it so much easier to sign in to the gyms through a mobile phone and then have online workouts, everything all in one app. And I think it's just those small changes. That involves technology that actually makes a big difference, but the bulk of the businesses still come from the offline business, which is quite traditional, to be honest.

(18:20) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, really interesting. You know, I think it's interesting because in, it's like you pull up substack or you pull out TechCrunch, it's like, oh, tech-enabled services are a terrible category. You need to focus on technology companies that are purely B2B, probably SaaS you know, especially those that are profitable and growing quickly. But it seems like, yeah, in Southeast Asia. It's almost like you have to build tech-enabled services because those are fundamental businesses that require better user experience, a better player to be built out, but it feels like, don't know what's the word, feels like a bunch of schizophrenia a little bit, right, because people are like, Oh, you know, I want to be in Indonesia. I want to build Southeast Asia, but I don't want to build brick and mortar. I don't want to build some of these tech-enabled services. So it's actually quite a tricky dynamic, to be honest.

(19:00) Anthony Tjajadi:

Yeah, I mean, when we say that we invest, we like to invest in tech-enabled traditional businesses doesn't mean that we move away completely from pure tech play. We also invest in SaaS plays as well and FinTech as well. So it's not like we completely eliminate them from our choices. I think there's a share for everyone to invest, but I feel like where we find most comfortable is those kinds of businesses.

(19:25) Jeremy Au:

So what's interesting is that there are not only tech-enabled services and technology companies but there are verticals that are harder than that. For example, we have agricultural tech, it's an up-and-coming sector in Indonesia currently. It's also very hot for both startup founders, but also for startup investments. What are your thoughts on that vertical?

(19:42) Anthony Tjajadi:

We invest quite a bit in agriculture as well. I think especially in the beginning when we first started, a lot of founders, a lot of investors would, because they know of our background in agriculture, a lot of them are attracted to us wanting to give some additional inputs into the market, but actually, at the end of the day, it's not exactly the sector that we look for, even though I think at the end of the day, we still have some investments in the sector, but I think a lot of the agritech businesses, at the end of the day, there's a lot of financing fintech element in the company as well.

So that's why I think It's agri, but it's not pure agri sector. If you talk about like pure agri tech sector, we would be talking about like smart sensors, and drone companies. I think those kinds of companies that are able to give better accuracy for fertilizer application or checking the health of the soil, but I think it's a very interesting sector, it's just that it's very hard to be applied, especially when you really go into the plantation. It's wild there. And I've met some agri-tech founders who are based out of like JB. I went to some of their factories in JB, and then I saw that JB has a highway there. And when you go to Indonesia and when you go to a real plantation, you don't have a highway there. The roads and the infrastructure are still very backward. You don't have like actual road. So I think it's not as easy, I would say.

(21:08) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. When you think about people who are thinking about joining venture capital in Indonesia, do you have any advice for them?

(21:14) Anthony Tjajadi:

It's exciting. It's fun, but it's quite volatile. If we look at a few years ago, there's much more partying going on. I think there was a lot of money that was coming into the region, but I feel like recently it has not been as easy. Funding has kinda dried out. So, yeah it's fun, but it might not be as easy as what people think it might be. And I'm not sure if I'm allowed to say this, but I think the turnover is quite high I am very grateful that we have not had anyone leave the company yet, but yeah I think because the character of the people are generally younger.

(21:55) Jeremy Au:

Right. Yeah, I think definitely a lot of turnover in venture capital people move in and out also because like I said, the industry is volatile, but folks are younger as well.

(22:04) Anthony Tjajadi:

I think maybe another advice that I just thought about, I think you need to be more of an extrovert because I think it's a very people-heavy kind of business whether you would be talking to other founders or whether you would be talking to other investors. I think it's important for you to be able to open up to the general public. Because when you work for banking or when you work in an accounting firm, you're probably not demanded to speak and meet so many people at one time.

(22:31) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. Could you share a little bit more about a time that you personally have been brave?

(22:35) Anthony Tjajadi:

Well, I think starting this fund I thought it was a crazy idea. When I first moved to Singapore, I didn't know anyone. My friends thought that I was taking on a challenge that was unnecessarily bigger than what was prepared for me. I came from a family business background. Naturally, I would be expected to fall on that path, but I decided to detour for a different challenge. And then now, five years later, here I am, and yeah, we're still working on big things for the future.

(23:01) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. When you think about setting up that fund, do any advice you have for people who want to set up their own VC fund?

(23:06) Anthony Tjajadi:

Be prepared to make mistakes because I think it will take some time in order for you to know where your risk appetite is. And I think it's very important to be able to identify where your risk appetite is because I think for every investor, they're different. You should not compare yourself to others because what you feel good about doesn't necessarily feel good for other people.

So I think make mistakes, experiment. Make mistakes as much as you can and as fast as you can. I think by doing that, then you would be able to figure out what kind of investors that you want to be. Because I think once you are able to identify that, you will be able to have a more targeted approach to your investment, what kind of companies you would want to go for, and what kind of team would be able to supplement your goal.

(23:55) Jeremy Au:

On that note, thank you so much for sharing your point of view. I love to summarize the three big takeaways from the conversation. First of all, thank you so much for sharing your point of view on what it takes to be a successful founder in Indonesia. So I think you gave a very good landscape about what it takes as a founder in terms of the hard work that you need to do, but also, you know, the awareness around why it takes to localize a business in Indonesia, as well as how to be aware of aspects like the politics in the market as well.

Secondly, thank you so much for sharing about what makes TriHill different in terms of how you set out to build a company to be different in terms of how you look at the thesis. For example, you look at tech-enabled services heavily. And how you're also comfortable, for example, with agricultural tech as a sector as well.

Lastly, thank you so much for sharing a little bit about your own personal perspective about how people should approach the tradecraft of venture capital in terms of what VC should be looking out for, but also how you compare the Indonesian market from the US and Chinese markets, but also, for example, how you look at what're the domains that VC should be careful about in the landscape as well. So, thank you so much for sharing Anthony.

(24:56) Anthony Tjajadi:

Thank you so much, Jeremy.

"Bersiaplah untuk melakukan kesalahan karena akan membutuhkan waktu bagi Anda untuk mengetahui di mana selera risiko Anda, yang sangat penting untuk diidentifikasi karena setiap investor berbeda. Jangan membandingkan diri Anda dengan orang lain karena apa yang Anda rasa cocok untuk Anda belum tentu cocok untuk orang lain. Jadi, bereksperimenlah dan lakukan kesalahan sebanyak dan secepat mungkin. Dengan melakukan itu, Anda akan dapat mengetahui investor seperti apa yang Anda inginkan. Setelah Anda mengidentifikasi hal tersebut, Anda akan dapat memiliki pendekatan yang lebih terarah dalam investasi Anda, jenis perusahaan yang ingin Anda tuju, dan tim seperti apa yang dapat membantu mencapai tujuan Anda." - Anthony Tjajadi

 

"Jika kita berbicara tentang Asia Tenggara, ada berbagai macam pasar. Kebanyakan orang mengenal Indonesia sebagai negara dengan populasi kelas menengah yang besar, muda, dan terus bertumbuh, namun pada kenyataannya, apa yang bisa dijual oleh perusahaan atau apa yang bisa dibeli oleh konsumen mungkin tidak semenarik kedengarannya secara makro. Ada berbagai faktor pembatas seperti lanskap politik. Anda membutuhkan landasan yang kuat agar Anda dapat memahami dan meningkatkan skala di pasar. kedua, pasokan. Yang kedua adalah rantai pasokan. Jaringan distribusi masih dalam tahap awal pengembangan, terutama di kota-kota Tier 2 dan Tier 3. Di Amerika Serikat, apa yang kita lihat sebagai tugas VC adalah mengidentifikasi dan mempercepat inovasi, tetapi di bagian bisnis ini, di bagian wilayah ini, bisnis teknologi murni jarang terjadi. Sebaliknya, kami melihat lebih banyak bisnis tradisional yang memanfaatkan teknologi yang akan lebih mudah, terutama dalam menghasilkan pelanggan dan pendapatan. Mereka cenderung memiliki unit ekonomi yang sehat dan efisiensi modal." - Anthony Tjajadi

 

"Mitos pertama adalah bahwa perusahaan modal ventura harus mengendalikan bisnis Anda. Meskipun kami memiliki hak suara dalam beberapa keputusan bisnis, terutama jika kami memegang posisi dewan direksi, kami tidak ingin mengambil alih bisnis Anda dan operasional perusahaan sehari-hari. Kami memberikan pengawasan dan panduan. Kami adalah dewan penasihat Anda. Kami membantu dengan strategi dan peta jalan, tetapi lebih penting bagi kami untuk membiarkan para pendiri melakukan pembangunan perusahaan karena itu adalah tugas pendiri, bukan VC. Mitos kedua adalah lebih banyak uang sama dengan lebih banyak kesuksesan. Apa yang telah kita lihat dalam beberapa tahun terakhir, banyak perusahaan yang telah mengumpulkan ratusan juta dolar mengalami kegagalan. Memiliki modal ventura dalam jumlah besar tidak menjamin kesuksesan sebuah startup. Terkadang, memiliki terlalu banyak dana bahkan dapat menyebabkan pengeluaran yang tidak efisien dan kurangnya fokus. Adalah tugas dan tanggung jawab VC untuk memastikan bahwa para pendiri ini tidak terlalu banyak mengambil jalan memutar."- Anthony Tjajadi

Anthony Tjajadi, Founding Partner di Trihill Capital, dan Jeremy Au, membahas tiga tema utama:

1. Wawasan Pasar Indonesia: Anthony membahas bahwa kualitas yang diperlukan untuk menjadi pendiri perusahaan Indonesia yang sukses adalah kerja keras, memahami dinamika pasar, dan memahami nuansa politik lokal, dengan contoh-contoh dalam tantangan rantai pasokan dan perilaku konsumen di kota-kota Tier 2 dan Tier 3. Dia berbagi penilaiannya bahwa meskipun Indonesia memiliki populasi kelas menengah yang besar, muda, dan terus berkembang, potensi belanja konsumen tidak sekuat yang ditunjukkan oleh indikator makro.

2. Tesis Investasi Trihill Capital: Anthony menggambarkan Trihill Capital sebagai perusahaan modal ventura yang bersifat sektoral, tahap awal hingga tahap pertumbuhan, yang lebih memilih berinvestasi di bisnis berbasis teknologi. Dia berbicara tentang fokus mereka pada skalabilitas, profitabilitas, ekonomi unit, dan kecepatan pertumbuhan ketika mengevaluasi perusahaan, serta pendekatan mereka untuk berinvestasi dalam ekuitas publik.

3. VC Tradecraft: Anthony memberikan saran mengenai apa yang harus dicari oleh VC dalam investasi potensial dan bagaimana menavigasi pasar Indonesia dibandingkan dengan Amerika Serikat dan Cina. Ia menekankan perlunya VC untuk menjadi ekstrovert dan berorientasi pada orang, mengingat perlunya interaksi yang konstan dengan para pendiri dan investor lainnya. Dia berbagi tentang langkah berani yang dia ambil untuk pindah ke Singapura untuk memulai dana dan menyarankan calon pemodal ventura untuk bersiap-siap membuat kesalahan dan memahami selera risiko pribadi mereka.

Jeremy dan Anthony juga membahas tesis di balik investasi di bidang agritech, perlunya para pendiri untuk sepenuhnya menyadari pasar mereka, dan pentingnya sistem pendukung yang kuat bagi para wirausahawan.

Didukung oleh Hive Health

Apakah Anda sedang melakukan ekspansi atau meluncurkan bisnis di Filipina? Memastikan kesehatan karyawan Anda adalah kunci untuk menarik dan mempertahankan talenta terbaik. Di situlah Hive Health hadir, terutama untuk perusahaan rintisan dan bisnis kecil hingga menengah. Mereka berspesialisasi dalam menyediakan rencana perawatan kesehatan berkualitas tinggi dan bebas gangguan yang disesuaikan dengan tempat kerja Anda. Pelajari lebih lanjut di www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:49) Jeremy Au:

Hei, Anthony, kami sangat senang Anda bisa hadir di acara ini. Anda telah sibuk berinvestasi di seluruh wilayah dan kami ingin sekali mendengar pandangan Anda. Anthony, silakan perkenalkan diri Anda.

(01:57) Anthony Tjajadi:

Terima kasih telah menerima saya, Jeremy. Saya pernah menjadi pendengar podcast Anda, jadi saya pikir ini adalah podcast pertama saya yang akan saya lakukan, dan saya hanya berpikir bahwa Anda terdengar akrab dan saya pikir akan lebih mudah untuk memulai pengalaman podcast saya dengan Anda. Ya, nama saya Anthony.

Saya adalah bagian dari Trihill Capital. Kami adalah perusahaan modal ventura tahap awal hingga tahap pertumbuhan yang berfokus di Asia Tenggara, sementara kami juga berinvestasi di ekuitas publik Amerika Serikat dan Tiongkok. Kami telah berdiri sejak tahun 2018 dan berbasis di Indonesia dan Singapura. Saya berasal dari latar belakang bisnis keluarga. Kami telah berkecimpung di sektor pertanian selama 30 tahun terakhir. Jadi saya pikir saya bisa melakukan diversifikasi dan mencoba sesuatu yang baru. Jadi pada tahun 2018, saya memutuskan untuk pindah ke Singapura untuk memulai dana tersebut. Mengapa Singapura? Saya pikir karena pada saat itu, investasi di sektor publik dan swasta jauh lebih menonjol daripada di Indonesia. Dan saya selalu memiliki ketertarikan yang mendalam pada sektor konsumen dan teknologi.

Tapi saya tidak pernah benar-benar ingin menjadi seorang pendiri. Jadi saya melihat sebuah celah. Saya melihat peluang untuk berinvestasi sebagai bentuk dukungan dan mendorong inovasi. Jadi ketika kami pertama kali memulai, kami berinvestasi di berbagai kelas aset yang berbeda. Kami ingin belajar tentang diri kami sendiri. Selera risiko kami dan di mana sweet spot kami. Hingga saat ini, saya rasa ini masih merupakan proses pembelajaran bagi saya dan tim. Pada fase awal investasi kami, kami juga berinvestasi di dana modal ventura. Ini adalah pengalaman awal kami berinvestasi di startup, kami dapat belajar dari beberapa investor terbaik di wilayah ini yang cukup baik untuk berbagi pengetahuan dan kebijaksanaan mereka, yang kemudian membuat kami percaya diri untuk memulai investasi kami sendiri. Jadi kami mulai berinvestasi langsung pada tahun 2021. Dan di sinilah kami tiga tahun kemudian.

(03:42) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Bisakah Anda berbagi lebih banyak tentang apa yang telah Anda pelajari tentang investasi di Asia Tenggara?

(03:47) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jika kita berbicara tentang Asia Tenggara, ada berbagai pasar yang berbeda. Saya akan berbicara terutama tentang Indonesia sebagai sebuah pasar karena kebanyakan orang mengenal Indonesia sebagai negara dengan populasi kelas menengah yang besar, muda, dan terus bertumbuh. Namun, pada kenyataannya, apa yang sebenarnya bisa dijual oleh perusahaan atau apa yang sebenarnya bisa dibeli oleh konsumen, mungkin tidak semenarik kedengarannya di tingkat makro. Ada berbagai faktor pembatas seperti, pertama, politik. Lanskap politik adalah bagian yang besar. Anda membutuhkan landasan yang kuat agar Anda dapat memahami dan mengukur pasar. Seperti yang Anda lihat, kita akan mengadakan pemilihan umum tahun depan. Banyak perusahaan, terutama yang besar, tidak akan membuat keputusan besar. Saya rasa mereka mencoba menghindari risiko besar sampai periode pemilu selesai. Kedua, rantai pasokan. Jaringan distribusi masih dalam tahap awal pengembangan, terutama di kota-kota Tier 2 dan Tier 3. Dan saya pikir di AS, apa yang telah kita lihat sebagai tugas VC adalah untuk mengidentifikasi inovasi baru yang dipercepat. Namun saya rasa di bagian bisnis di kawasan ini, bisnis teknologi murni masih jarang ditemukan. Saya pikir kita melihat lebih banyak bisnis tradisional yang diaktifkan dengan teknologi yang mungkin akan memiliki waktu yang lebih mudah, terutama dalam menghasilkan pelanggan dan pendapatan, saya pikir mereka lebih cenderung memiliki ekonomi unit yang sehat dan efisiensi modal.

Namun seperti yang bisa kita lihat, batas atas pertumbuhannya juga terbatas. Saya pikir karena isu-isu ini, saya pikir investor perlu memahami dan menyesuaikan target pengembalian mereka, yang juga mengalir ke dalam valuasi masuk. Jadi saya rasa perusahaan-perusahaan di Indonesia, terutama di masa new normal ini. Saya rasa mereka harus bisa menemukan PMF lebih awal. Karena di sini, saya rasa tidak ada yang namanya return 500 hingga seribu kali lipat. Perusahaan teknologi terbesar yang kita miliki di kawasan ini adalah GoTo, yaitu Gojek dan Tokopedia, dua pemimpin yang bergabung dengan valuasi kurang dari 10 miliar. Jadi, dengan pengembalian 1000 kali lipat, Anda harus berinvestasi di perusahaan dengan valuasi 10 juta dolar dan melakukan prorata di setiap putarannya. Bagi saya, ini bukanlah kasus yang masuk akal.

(05:55) Jeremy Au:

Dan yang menarik adalah Anda mulai membandingkan pasar Amerika Serikat dengan pasar Indonesia. Dan saya tahu bahwa Anda memiliki pengalaman tidak hanya dalam modal ventura, tetapi juga ekuitas publik, yang memberi Anda perbandingan yang cukup baik di berbagai kelas aset. Jadi, menurut Anda, bagaimana pasar AS dan mungkin pasar Tiongkok berbeda dengan Indonesia?

(06:13) Anthony Tjajadi:

Saya pikir pasar AS adalah pasar yang jauh lebih berkembang. Saya pikir sebagian besar likuiditas datang dari AS. Banyak pengembangan awal biasanya terjadi di AS, tetapi saya pikir jika kita membandingkannya dengan Cina atau bahkan Indonesia, ada banyak copy dan paste, tetapi kemudian beradaptasi dan melokalkannya, tetapi untuk Cina, ini adalah pasar yang berbeda. Maksud saya, jika Anda bertanya kepada saya tentang Cina, tiga, empat tahun yang lalu, saya mungkin akan mengatakan hal yang berbeda, tetapi saya pikir apa yang telah kita lihat dalam beberapa tahun terakhir, Cina telah, saya ingin mengatakan diserang, tetapi mereka mengalami jenis lingkungan baru di mana pemerintah telah melakukan intervensi dengan cara yang begitu besar, yang menurut saya membuat takut banyak pendiri teknologi baru, terutama apa yang telah kita lihat di pasar properti baru-baru ini. Dan beberapa tahun yang lalu, itu adalah pasar pendidikan. Jadi saya pikir banyak pendiri teknologi, dalam beberapa tahun terakhir, mulai mempertanyakan apakah layak untuk memulai sebuah perusahaan di Tiongkok, atau mungkin mereka harus pergi ke luar negeri dan memulainya di negara lain.

(07:18) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Jadi, ketika Anda berpikir tentang perusahaan di Indonesia, jenis perusahaan seperti apa yang Anda cari? Apakah Anda mencari perusahaan yang lebih berorientasi pada konsumen atau berorientasi pada bisnis atau ada hal lain yang Anda cari?

(07:30) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi saya pikir secara umum, di TriHill Capital, kami adalah sektor yang agnostik. Kami lebih melihat pada tahap awal, dan kami cenderung lebih memilih bisnis tradisional yang menggunakan teknologi daripada bisnis teknologi murni. Saya akan mengatakan lebih suka, bukan keharusan sepenuhnya, tetapi saya pikir tiga sifat terpenting yang kami cari di perusahaan adalah skalabilitas, profitabilitas, yang merupakan unit ekonomi, dan kecepatan pertumbuhan. Saya rasa setelah model bisnisnya tepat, barulah kita melihat tim pendirinya. Apakah mereka cukup kuat untuk menjalankan tiga perdagangan untuk berhasil? Lalu, kami bertanya pada diri sendiri, bagaimana kompetisinya? Bisakah mereka menembus dan menang? Dan ketika kami yakin mereka bisa, kami berinvestasi. Begitu kami bekerja dengan mereka, kami cenderung sangat aktif. Kami fokus untuk memperbaiki ekonomi unit, dan margin, atau kami akan membantu menentukan arah strategis atau bahkan menemukan kemitraan komersial. Jadi itulah beberapa hal yang akan kami lakukan.

(08:22) Jeremy Au:

Benar. Dan ketika Anda bertemu dengan seorang pendiri untuk pertama kalinya, apa yang Anda harapkan dari mereka?

(08:27) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi, ketika saya bertemu dengan mereka, saya ingin sekali melihat seorang pendiri yang benar-benar siap. Saya rasa meskipun Anda belum pernah melakukan hal ini jutaan kali, berlatihlah untuk bersikap langsung. Siapa pelanggan Anda? Seberapa besar pasar itu? Dengan siapa Anda bersaing? Menurut Anda, apa yang dimaksud dengan AOV? Bagaimana Anda bisa mencapai pendapatan 10, 50, seratus juta dolar? Saya merasa matematika harus ada di sana. Anda harus tahu TAM Anda. Anda harus tahu pasar yang dituju. Dengan siapa Anda memulai? Ke mana Anda akan melangkah dari sana? Dalam hal segmen pelanggan, lebih spesifik lagi, siapa mereka? Apa yang kecil? Apa yang besar? Berapa total pendapatannya? Berapa jumlah karyawannya? Jika Anda berada di pasar menengah, apa artinya berada di pasar Anda? Dan yang terakhir, mengapa kami harus berinvestasi pada Anda dan mengapa sekarang? Karena menurut saya, dalam iklim saat ini di mana pendanaan menjadi langka, lanskap menjadi lebih kompetitif dan para pendiri harus siap setiap saat.

(09:15) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Dan ketika Anda melihat para pendiri ini, apa saja sinyal atau tanda bahaya bagi para pendiri yang tidak, Anda tahu, jika Anda tidak siap, itu sudah jelas, bukan? Tetapi ketika Anda berbicara tentang pendiri yang baik, dipoles dan dipersiapkan, apa saja tanda bahaya atau cerita yang Anda miliki tentang hal-hal yang memberi Anda sinyal bahwa ini mungkin bukan investasi yang baik untuk diambil saat ini?

(09:34) Anthony Tjajadi:

Saya rasa ketika kita melihat para pendiri, apa yang membuat perbedaan besar bagi mereka adalah kerja keras dan tekad, karena, bagi saya, ini mungkin bukan pendapat yang populer, namun jika Anda adalah seorang pendiri yang bercita-cita tinggi, lupakanlah keseimbangan antara pekerjaan dan kehidupan pribadi. Jika Anda berada di level C di perusahaan, ruang lingkup pekerjaan adalah segalanya. Hanya karena Anda adalah seorang CEO, bukan berarti Anda tidak menangani pekerjaan CEO, atau sebaliknya, karena menurut saya, peran CEO berubah seiring dengan kemajuan perusahaan, dan perubahan dalam industri ini berjalan dengan cepat. Anda harus terus beradaptasi dan menyesuaikan diri untuk bertahan. Dan menurut saya, di luar pekerjaan, akan lebih baik jika Anda memiliki sistem pendukung yang kuat, entah itu keluarga atau pasangan Anda, karena mereka akan dapat mengurus kehidupan di luar pekerjaan, karena jika Anda terlalu memikirkan apa yang akan Anda lakukan di akhir pekan berikutnya, misalnya, ke mana Anda akan terbang untuk liburan Natal berikutnya? Saya rasa hal tersebut akan mengambil cukup banyak fokus Anda dari pekerjaan. Dan dengan tingkat masalah yang tidak terduga dan baru yang akan Anda alami setiap hari, saya pikir Anda tidak bisa terganggu karena sekarang Anda memiliki orang-orang yang mengandalkan Anda. Dan menurut saya, yang lebih buruk lagi adalah ketika Anda masih bersemangat, terkadang investor mengatakan ya, tetapi mereka tidak bersungguh-sungguh. Terkadang mereka bahkan menandatangani, tapi tetap tidak mentransfer dana. Jadi saya rasa Anda harus selalu siap dengan rencana B, C, dan D.

(10:47) Jeremy Au:

Dan dari sudut pandang Anda, apa yang diperlukan untuk menjadi pendiri yang sukses?

(10:52) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi saya pikir, seperti yang saya sebutkan, saya pikir dua sifat itu sangat penting bagi saya, yaitu kerja keras dan tekad. Jadi saya rasa ketika kami bertemu dengan seorang founder, kami mencoba sebisa mungkin untuk menganalisa kedua sifat tersebut. Karena jaringan yang kami miliki sangat beragam, kami biasanya memiliki seseorang untuk melakukan cross-check tentang orang tersebut. Jadi mudah-mudahan ketika kami mendapatkan sinyal yang baik dari orang lain, terutama pada dua aspek tersebut, saya pikir itu biasanya merupakan lampu hijau untuk kami.

(11:24) Jeremy Au:

Dan mulai berbicara sedikit tentang Trihill dalam hal proses Anda, apa yang membuat Trihill berbeda?

(11:28) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi saya pikir, pertama-tama, kami adalah reksa dana yang selalu hijau. Jadi prioritas utama kami adalah kinerja investasi kami, dan saya rasa hal ini secara langsung berasal dari para pendiri kami dan bisnis mereka. Kedua, kami juga berinvestasi di ekuitas publik. Kami melakukan riset dari bawah ke atas dan banyak model bisnis yang kami lihat di ruang privat lebih mungkin terjadi di ruang publik lebih awal. Mungkin tidak di negara yang sama, tetapi pasti ada sesuatu yang cukup mirip untuk kami pelajari. Ketiga, kami adalah pemegang saham di salah satu bank terbesar di negara ini. Kami telah melakukan banyak kemitraan dengan perusahaan-perusahaan portofolio kami, yang membantu mereka untuk tumbuh lebih cepat ke tahap berikutnya. Terakhir, saya rasa saya dapat mengatakan bahwa kami adalah sebuah tim operator. Kami berasal dari latar belakang bisnis yang berbeda, konsumen, ritel, fintech, dan konstruksi, jadi saya merasa kami memiliki pengalaman dalam memulai bisnis atau memimpin sebuah tim. Dan saya rasa karena itu, kami sering kali dapat berhubungan dan terhubung lebih baik dengan para pendiri kami.

(12:30) Jeremy Au:

Ya, bagaimana Anda membangun Trihill Capital dalam hal perekrutan orang baru dan membangun proses yang sama dengan proses Anda?

(12:36) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi saya pikir ketika kami pertama kali memulai, saya benar-benar tahu persis bagaimana kami akan berkembang, seberapa besar tim ini akan menjadi, tetapi ketika saya mencoba membangun budaya Trihill Capital, modal, memiliki pola pikir pertumbuhan adalah kuncinya. Untuk setiap personel, untuk budaya kami sebagai sebuah perusahaan, dan saya pikir dua pendorong terpenting bagi kami untuk dapat mencapai hal ini adalah keterbukaan terhadap kritik dan kemauan untuk belajar, karena menurut saya jika Anda memiliki dua hal tersebut, tidak ada yang dapat menghentikan Anda untuk berkembang. Menurut saya, lanskap VC sangat dinamis, dan jika Anda tidak mengikutinya, Anda akan tertinggal. Dan secara khusus dalam peran saya untuk memimpin tim, saya pikir saya percaya bahwa jika Anda menjaga orang-orang, pertumbuhan dan perkembangan mereka, impian dan aspirasi mereka, mereka akan memberikan energi yang sama ke dalam bisnis.

Dan saya juga memiliki rekan kerja, dan saya sudah mengenalnya sejak lama. Kami telah mengalami pasang surut. Menurut saya, hal yang penting dalam bekerja dengan rekan kerja adalah mengetahui dengan pasti apa peran Anda, dan apa yang Anda kuasai. Jadi dengan setiap masalah atau situasi, terkadang Anda memimpin, dan terkadang Anda mengikuti. Dan menurut saya, mengetahui kapan harus turun tangan dan kapan harus mundur adalah yin dan yang dari kemitraan dan seluruh tim.

(13:46) Jeremy Au:

Menurut Anda, apa saja mitos umum tentang investasi startup di Indonesia?

(13:51) Anthony Tjajadi:

Oke, mungkin dua hal. Pertama. VC harus mengendalikan bisnis Anda. Saya pikir meskipun kami memiliki hak suara dalam beberapa keputusan bisnis, terutama jika kami memegang posisi dewan direksi, kami tidak ingin mengambil alih bisnis Anda, terutama operasional perusahaan sehari-hari. Kami memberikan pengawasan dan panduan. Kami adalah dewan penasihat Anda, kami membantu dengan strategi dan peta jalan, tetapi saya pikir lebih penting bagi kami untuk membiarkan para pendiri melakukan pembangunan perusahaan karena menurut saya itu adalah tugas pendiri, bukan VC.

Kedua, lebih banyak uang sama dengan lebih banyak kesuksesan. Saya rasa apa yang telah kita lihat dalam beberapa tahun terakhir, banyak perusahaan yang telah mengumpulkan ratusan juta dolar telah gagal. Jadi, hanya dengan memiliki modal ventura dalam jumlah besar tidak menjamin kesuksesan sebuah startup. Terkadang memiliki terlalu banyak dana bahkan dapat menyebabkan pengeluaran yang tidak efisien, kurangnya fokus. Dan menurut saya, tugas dan tanggung jawab VC adalah untuk memastikan bahwa para pendiri ini tidak terlalu banyak mengambil jalan memutar.

(14:44) Jeremy Au: A

Dan saya rasa yang Anda sebutkan tadi adalah tentang bagian pelokalan. Jadi banyak orang yang mencoba menyalin dan menempelkan sesuatu dari Amerika Serikat atau sesuatu dari Cina ke Indonesia. Kadang-kadang berhasil, kadang-kadang tidak. Dapatkah Anda berbagi lebih banyak lagi tentang apa yang menurut Anda penting untuk diingat di sini?

(14:58) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi saya pikir pelokalan, maksud saya, sekali lagi, saya akan mengatakan bahwa model bisnis yang berbeda akan memiliki cara pelokalan yang berbeda. Namun, menurut saya, memiliki orang-orang di lapangan sangatlah penting. Jika Anda akan berinvestasi di Indonesia atau di Vietnam, katakanlah, dana Anda berbasis di Singapura. Ini akan sulit, bahkan bagi saya sendiri yang sudah tinggal di Singapura selama beberapa waktu. Saya dibesarkan di Indonesia. Saya dibesarkan di Indonesia. Saya menghabiskan sebagian besar hidup saya di Indonesia, tetapi dalam beberapa tahun terakhir, saya tidak menghabiskan banyak waktu di Indonesia. Rasanya berbeda. Kecepatan perkembangannya begitu cepat. Dan jika Anda tidak meninggalkan dan menghirup udara Indonesia, akan sulit bagi Anda untuk melokalkannya. Dan akan sulit bagi Anda untuk meyakinkan para pendiri bahwa, Oh, kami akan dapat membantu Anda. Bagi saya, akan sulit bagi Anda untuk dapat membantu perusahaan atau pendiri yang melakukan pekerjaan mereka di negara lain, di negara yang belum pernah Anda tinggali sebelumnya. Jadi menurut saya, jika Anda serius ingin pindah atau mengembangkan perusahaan Anda secara regional ke negara lain, saya rasa penting bagi Anda untuk memindahkan orang-orang Anda ke sana. Atau lebih baik lagi, Anda harus pergi ke negara tersebut.

(16:06) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Satu hal yang Anda sebutkan adalah Anda mengatakan bahwa Anda sangat fokus pada layanan yang mendukung teknologi daripada bisnis teknologi. Dan ini cukup menarik karena banyak VC yang saya kenal justru sebaliknya, bukan? Mereka lebih fokus pada perusahaan teknologi daripada perusahaan layanan yang mendukung teknologi. Jadi sebenarnya, setelah saya merenungkannya, saya pikir ini adalah perbedaan yang cukup besar. Dapatkah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang tesis atau hipotesis Anda di sini?

(16:26) Anthony Tjajadi:

Jadi saya rasa karena latar belakang tim kami yang memiliki latar belakang bisnis, kami cenderung tertarik pada bisnis yang lebih tradisional yang dapat kami terapkan teknologi di dalamnya. Saya berikan dua contoh. Ada satu perusahaan. Perusahaan ini hanyalah sebuah pusat bimbingan belajar di Singapura. Dia adalah salah satu pembicara podcast Anda sebelumnya.

(16:49) Jeremy Au:

Evan dari Zenith Education?

(16:50) Anthony Tjajadi:

Ya, Evan. Dan ketika mereka pertama kali mendekati kami, mereka hanya memiliki bisnis fisik. Itu hanya pusat bimbingan belajar biasa di pusat kota Singapura. Namun kemudian, ketika mereka mendekati kami, mereka berkata, Oh, saya ingin menerapkan strategi baru ke dalam bisnis ini. Saya ingin memiliki hamparan teknologi dalam bisnis kami dan kami menyukai bisnis semacam itu karena menurut saya dengan bisnis fisik, sudah ada keuntungan nyata yang didapat dari perusahaan. Dan kemudian ketika mereka ingin melakukan overlay teknologi, jika mereka ingin membakar sejumlah uang untuk mengembangkan diri mereka sendiri, meningkatkan diri mereka sendiri, untuk membedakan diri mereka dari pasar, kami ada di dalamnya. Kami akan sangat mendukung perusahaan semacam ini. Saya rasa perusahaan lain yang kami miliki adalah perusahaan kesehatan dan kebugaran di Indonesia. Perusahaan ini hanyalah sebuah bisnis gym fisik, namun menurut saya agar mereka dapat membedakan diri mereka dari penawaran yang ada saat ini di pasar, mereka hanya perlu menambahkan teknologi sederhana ke dalam operasi mereka. Jadi, katakanlah sebelum mereka ada di pasar, tidak ada seorang pun yang melakukan pendaftaran melalui telepon. Maksud saya, sesederhana itu, karena kita hidup dengan ponsel kita sepanjang waktu. Dan saya pikir ini akan jauh lebih mudah.

Hal ini membuatnya jauh lebih mudah untuk masuk ke gym melalui ponsel dan kemudian berolahraga secara online, semuanya dalam satu aplikasi. Dan menurut saya, ini hanyalah perubahan-perubahan kecil. Hal itu melibatkan teknologi yang benar-benar membuat perbedaan besar, tetapi sebagian besar bisnis masih berasal dari bisnis offline, yang cukup tradisional, sejujurnya.

(18:20) Jeremy Au:

Ya, sangat menarik. Anda tahu, menurut saya ini menarik karena di dalam, ini seperti Anda menarik substack atau Anda menarik TechCrunch, ini seperti, oh, layanan berbasis teknologi adalah kategori yang mengerikan. Anda harus fokus pada perusahaan teknologi yang murni B2B, mungkin SaaS, terutama yang menguntungkan dan tumbuh dengan cepat. Tapi sepertinya, ya, di Asia Tenggara. Sepertinya Anda harus membangun layanan berbasis teknologi karena itu adalah bisnis fundamental yang membutuhkan pengalaman pengguna yang lebih baik, pemain yang lebih baik untuk dibangun, tapi rasanya seperti, tidak tahu apa istilahnya, terasa seperti sedikit skizofrenia, karena orang-orang seperti, Oh, Anda tahu, saya ingin berada di Indonesia. Saya ingin membangun Asia Tenggara, tapi saya tidak ingin membangun batu bata dan mortir. Saya tidak ingin membangun beberapa layanan yang didukung teknologi. Jadi, sebenarnya ini adalah dinamika yang cukup rumit, sejujurnya.

(19:00) Anthony Tjajadi:

Ya, maksud saya, ketika kami mengatakan bahwa kami berinvestasi, kami ingin berinvestasi di bisnis tradisional yang didukung teknologi, bukan berarti kami menjauh sepenuhnya dari permainan teknologi murni. Kami juga berinvestasi di bidang SaaS dan FinTech. Jadi, bukan berarti kami sepenuhnya menghilangkannya dari pilihan kami. Saya pikir ada bagian bagi semua orang untuk berinvestasi, tetapi saya merasa bahwa tempat yang paling nyaman bagi kami adalah bisnis-bisnis tersebut.

(19:25) Jeremy Au:

Jadi, yang menarik adalah bahwa tidak hanya ada layanan yang didukung teknologi dan perusahaan teknologi, tetapi ada juga sektor vertikal yang lebih sulit dari itu. Sebagai contoh, kami memiliki teknologi pertanian, ini adalah sektor yang sedang naik daun di Indonesia saat ini. Sektor ini juga sangat menarik bagi para pendiri startup, dan juga bagi para investor. Apa pendapat Anda tentang vertikal tersebut?

(19:42) Anthony Tjajadi:

Kami juga berinvestasi cukup banyak di bidang pertanian. Saya pikir terutama di awal ketika kami pertama kali memulai, banyak pendiri, banyak investor, karena mereka tahu latar belakang kami di bidang pertanian, banyak dari mereka yang tertarik dengan kami yang ingin memberikan masukan tambahan ke dalam pasar, tetapi sebenarnya, pada akhirnya, ini bukanlah sektor yang kami cari, meskipun saya pikir pada akhirnya, kami masih memiliki beberapa investasi di sektor ini, tetapi saya pikir banyak bisnis agritech, pada akhirnya, ada banyak elemen fintech pembiayaan di perusahaan ini.

Jadi, itulah mengapa saya pikir ini adalah agrikultur, tetapi bukan sektor agrikultur murni. Jika Anda berbicara tentang sektor teknologi agrikultur murni, kita akan berbicara tentang sensor pintar dan perusahaan drone. Saya pikir perusahaan-perusahaan semacam itu yang dapat memberikan akurasi yang lebih baik untuk aplikasi pupuk atau memeriksa kesehatan tanah, tetapi saya pikir ini adalah sektor yang sangat menarik, hanya saja sangat sulit untuk diterapkan, terutama ketika Anda benar-benar masuk ke perkebunan. Di sana sangat liar. Dan saya telah bertemu dengan beberapa pendiri agri-teknologi yang berbasis di tempat seperti JB. Saya pergi ke beberapa pabrik mereka di JB, dan kemudian saya melihat bahwa JB memiliki jalan raya di sana. Dan ketika Anda pergi ke Indonesia dan ketika Anda pergi ke perkebunan yang sebenarnya, Anda tidak memiliki jalan raya di sana. Jalan-jalan dan infrastrukturnya masih sangat terbelakang. Anda tidak memiliki jalan raya yang sebenarnya. Jadi menurut saya, hal ini tidak mudah.

(21:08) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Ketika Anda berpikir tentang orang-orang yang berpikir untuk bergabung dengan modal ventura di Indonesia, apakah Anda memiliki saran untuk mereka?

(21:14) Anthony Tjajadi:

Sangat menyenangkan. Menyenangkan, tetapi cukup fluktuatif. Jika kita melihat beberapa tahun yang lalu, ada lebih banyak pesta yang terjadi. Saya rasa ada banyak uang yang masuk ke wilayah ini, namun saya merasa akhir-akhir ini tidak semudah itu. Pendanaan agak mengering. Jadi, ya, ini menyenangkan, tetapi mungkin tidak semudah yang dibayangkan orang. Dan saya tidak yakin apakah saya boleh mengatakan ini, tapi saya pikir omsetnya cukup tinggi. Saya sangat bersyukur bahwa kami belum ada yang keluar dari perusahaan, tapi ya, saya pikir karena karakter orang-orangnya yang pada umumnya lebih muda.

(21:55) Jeremy Au:

Benar. Ya, saya rasa pasti banyak pergantian orang di modal ventura yang masuk dan keluar juga karena seperti yang saya katakan, industri ini mudah berubah, tetapi orang-orangnya juga lebih muda.

(22:04) Anthony Tjajadi:

Saya pikir mungkin saran lain yang baru saja saya pikirkan, saya pikir Anda harus lebih ekstrovert karena menurut saya ini adalah jenis bisnis yang sangat banyak orang, baik ketika Anda berbicara dengan pendiri lain atau ketika Anda berbicara dengan investor lain. Saya rasa penting bagi Anda untuk bisa membuka diri kepada masyarakat umum. Karena ketika Anda bekerja di perbankan atau di kantor akuntan, Anda mungkin tidak dituntut untuk berbicara dan bertemu dengan banyak orang dalam satu waktu.

(22:31) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang saat-saat yang membuat Anda secara pribadi menjadi berani?

(22:35) Anthony Tjajadi:

Saya pikir memulai dana ini adalah ide yang gila. Ketika pertama kali pindah ke Singapura, saya tidak mengenal siapa pun. Teman-teman saya mengira bahwa saya mengambil tantangan yang tidak perlu lebih besar dari apa yang disiapkan untuk saya. Saya berasal dari latar belakang bisnis keluarga. Secara alami, saya diharapkan untuk jatuh di jalur itu, tetapi saya memutuskan untuk mengambil jalan memutar untuk tantangan yang berbeda. Dan sekarang, lima tahun kemudian, di sinilah saya, dan ya, kami masih mengerjakan hal-hal besar untuk masa depan.

(23:01) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Ketika Anda berpikir untuk menyiapkan dana tersebut, apakah ada saran yang Anda miliki untuk orang-orang yang ingin menyiapkan dana VC mereka sendiri?

(23:06) Anthony Tjajadi:

Bersiaplah untuk melakukan kesalahan karena menurut saya akan membutuhkan waktu untuk mengetahui di mana selera risiko Anda. Dan menurut saya, sangat penting untuk dapat mengidentifikasi di mana selera risiko Anda karena menurut saya setiap investor berbeda. Anda tidak boleh membandingkan diri Anda dengan orang lain karena apa yang Anda rasa baik belum tentu baik bagi orang lain.

Jadi menurut saya, buatlah kesalahan, bereksperimenlah. Lakukan kesalahan sebanyak mungkin dan secepat mungkin. Saya rasa dengan melakukan hal itu, maka Anda akan dapat mengetahui investor seperti apa yang Anda inginkan. Karena menurut saya, setelah Anda dapat mengidentifikasi hal tersebut, Anda akan dapat memiliki pendekatan yang lebih terarah terhadap investasi Anda, perusahaan seperti apa yang ingin Anda tuju, dan tim seperti apa yang dapat melengkapi tujuan Anda.

(23:55) Jeremy Au:

Untuk itu, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi pandangan Anda. Saya ingin merangkum tiga hal penting yang dapat diambil dari percakapan ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih banyak telah membagikan sudut pandang Anda tentang apa yang diperlukan untuk menjadi seorang pendiri yang sukses di Indonesia. Saya rasa Anda telah memberikan gambaran yang sangat bagus tentang apa yang diperlukan sebagai seorang founder dalam hal kerja keras yang perlu Anda lakukan, tetapi juga, Anda tahu, kesadaran tentang mengapa penting untuk melokalkan bisnis di Indonesia, serta bagaimana menyadari aspek-aspek seperti politik di pasar juga.

Kedua, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang apa yang membuat TriHill berbeda dalam hal bagaimana Anda membangun sebuah perusahaan untuk menjadi berbeda dalam hal bagaimana Anda melihat tesis. Sebagai contoh, Anda sangat memperhatikan layanan berbasis teknologi. Dan bagaimana Anda juga merasa nyaman, misalnya, dengan teknologi pertanian sebagai sebuah sektor.

Terakhir, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi sedikit tentang perspektif pribadi Anda tentang bagaimana orang harus mendekati perdagangan modal ventura dalam hal apa yang harus diperhatikan oleh VC, tetapi juga bagaimana Anda membandingkan pasar Indonesia dengan pasar Amerika Serikat dan Cina, tetapi juga, misalnya, bagaimana Anda melihat apa saja domain yang harus diperhatikan oleh VC dalam lanskap tersebut. Jadi, terima kasih banyak untuk sharing-nya Anthony.

(24:56) Anthony Tjajadi:

Terima kasih banyak, Jeremy.