Jelmer Ikink: 10 Year Life Projections, Foxmont VC Founding Vision & Childhood Curiosity (Lehman Brothers & McKinsey) - E365

· VC and Angels,Philippines,Podcast Episodes,Southeast Asia

“When I came to the Philippines in 2011, there was a small market. We did the analysis for our presentations and there was about $40 million in annual deal flow. The pandemic was terrible for a lot of people, but it made the Philippines leap from analog to digital. E-wallets went from 30 million accounts to now 86 million, and that's just G-Cash. That's a huge percentage of the Philippine population, which is around 117 million. You see that in a lot of other sectors in the Philippine economy as well. It leapfrogged over those couple of years, and as a result, a lot of business opportunities and startup opportunities arose from that massive change. In the last two years, we've seen each year more than a billion dollars invested in terms of deal flow and that's 25X over those 10 years.” - Jelmer Ikink

“It's interesting to see how much what we set up was needed or demanded from entrepreneurs. The other week, we had our Foxmont Summit, which is an annual event that we have with the founders that we invested in. We invite experts in particular fields like a motivational coach, a professional athlete, a finance or HR expert, and they try to share their expertise with our founders. We also try to have our founders mingle with each other and find synergies within the Foxmont community and it’s really exciting to see how that “Foxmont Mafia” grows every year. I had never expected that it would take off so much over such a short time. It's a testament to our founders because, at the end of the day, we invest in them. We help and support them as much as we can, but they are the ones with the idea and the ones who execute together with their team. So to me, one learning is that the entrepreneurial spirit and quality are here in the Philippines. It just needs to be activated by stakeholders like us and other VC firms in the region and the country.” - Jelmer Ikink

“As in any country, there are a lot of problems, but there's also a lot of growth through digitization. Philippine labor used to be very cheap and it is still relatively cheap, so if you look at the B2B site, historically, if there was a problem, enterprises threw more warm bodies at it, and more employees to fix the problem. And that has resulted in the productivity of the Philippine workforce being relatively steady. It hasn't increased so much over the years. And so, what we're seeing now is digital adoption, B2B SaaS platforms are being increasingly integrated into these enterprises so the Filipino workforce can become more productive. They don't have to do these repetitive tasks anymore and can start doing more complex work that adds a lot of value to the businesses. So that's one area, one problem that has been addressed over time.”

Jelmer Ikink, Founding Partner of Foxmont Capital Partners, and Jeremy Au talked about three main topics:

1. Childhood Curiosity (Lehman Brothers & McKinsey): Jelmer shared about his childhood habit of walking around with his hands behind his back and asking questions. This deep-rooted curiosity translated into his academic life, initially pursuing finance for his undergraduate studies and law and diplomacy for his master's degree. He talked about his transition from investment banking at Lehman Brothers to McKinsey management consulting to entrepreneurial ventures in China and the Philippines.

2. Foxmont Founding Vision: Jelmer discussed how they decided on the name Foxmont Capital Partners after being inspired by the discerning nature of foxes as well as their regular meeting spots at the Fairmont and Raffles hotels. He highlighted Foxmont's commitment to nurturing the entrepreneurial landscape in the Philippines. He also talked about the success of their annual Foxmont Summit that convenes the founder ecosystem.

3. 10-Year Life Projections: Jelmer dove into the significant risk he took in deciding to move to Asia and away from a more certain career path. He used the technique of projecting himself ten years into the future to weigh where he would rather be and what stories he would like to have accumulated in his life. He acknowledged that while parts of the journey turned out better (and worse) than expected, he had intentionally chosen to be more mindful of his experience with fewer expectations of himself.

Jeremy and Jelmer also talked about the future shifts in the Philippines’ investment landscape, the country’s macroeconomic growth and the role of luck in VC.

Supported by Hive Health

Are you expanding or launching a business in the Philippines? Ensuring your employees' good health is key to attracting and retaining top talent. That's where Hive Health comes in, especially for startups and small to medium-sized businesses. They specialize in providing top-quality and hassle-free healthcare plans tailored to your workplace. Learn more at www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:59) Jeremy Au:

Hey, Jelmer. Really excited to have you on the show. You're representing Foxmont and so many good things. Franco has been on the show before and said that you'd be an amazing perspective to share your journey experience. I'd love for you to introduce yourself.

(02:10) Jelmer Ikink:

Great. Yeah. Thanks for having me, Jeremy. I hope to meet that hurdle that Franco set for me. I'm Jelmer. I'm indeed one of the founding partners of Foxmont. We started Foxmont in 2018. It's a Philippine-focused VC firm. We started it with the belief that there should be a player in the Philippines that really has the founders first and as entrepreneurs ourselves, and I'm sure we'll talk about that. We thought that we would be potentially a good, you know, group of people to help founders in the Philippines. I personally have a background in consulting. I worked with McKinsey at the start of my career. I also was at Lehman Brothers Investment Banking for a while and realized banking was really not for me. So moved to China where I did private equity for a couple of years. Then I moved to the Philippines where I set up my own company. And through that process kind of really understood the challenges and the things that entrepreneurs really need in the Philippines to get their business growing, and that was a little bit of the mission or the start of Foxmont.

(03:08) Jeremy Au:

Awesome. So what were you like as a kid?

(03:10) Jelmer Ikink:

I was very curious. My parents always say that I had both of my hands on my back, and I would walk around all over the place and just ask people questions all the time. And why, why, why? It's also in my report cards at school still and so I'm pretty sure that I annoyed a lot of people as well. But yeah, the curiosity was always kind of in my blood.

(03:29) Jeremy Au:

I like the idea and mental image of you walking with your hands behind your back, like a, so like a boss, like a, like this playground is my domain.

(03:37) Jelmer Ikink:

Well, really more like just curious and trying to understand what's going on around me, I suppose.

(03:42) Jeremy Au:

Awesome. And so what's interesting is that you know, you, what were you studying as a kid and as a teenager, what did you think you were going to be when you grew up at that point in time?

(03:51) Jelmer Ikink:

I always liked numbers when I was young. I had no concept of what a profession really was, but I always said that I wanted to be an engineer. I liked working with numbers. Architecture, I also really liked both for the aesthetics, but also because it has a lot of, you know, structural and numerical components to it. Then, as I. I went through middle school in the Netherlands, and I realized, you know, I kind of got introduced to the world of finance and business and economics really captured me really kind of understanding, or for me at least, combines a lot of factors and features of how the world works and how people interact with each other. And again, also that numerical component. So, really like that and decided to pursue that. So, for my college, my undergrad, I studied finance and business and then for my master's later, I did law and diplomacy. So, I really kind of have more of the qualitative components to that and really enjoyed both.

(04:41) Jeremy Au:

So how did you end up picking your first job?

(04:42) Jelmer Ikink:

Oh, that's a good question. So I mean, I think it's actually a little, it's a bit standard. So I studied finance and that was at a time when banking, investment banking was really kind of the job to have. And so I applied to a number of investment banks and Lehman Brothers initially. So, not really too much introspection involved with that, but it did teach me a lot. I would say.

(05:05) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. What did you learn?

(05:06) Jelmer Ikink:

FIrstly, to really understand how to look at a business, to go through a business by looking at the financial statements and analysts, recordings, quarterly reporting, testing people are saying what management is saying, and whether that jives with what we're seeing in the numbers understanding how business models pivot over time and how new revenue sources are added over time. So, really, it was in a way, an extension of my undergrad degree to really put into practice what I learned in theory there.

(05:37) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. So, I think what's interesting is that the Lehman Brothers was, in its heyday, a very popular, huge investment bank, like you said, and then after that, unfortunately, I think it's no more today. I'm kind of curious since you have some history of that, what do you think about it?

(05:50) Jelmer Ikink:

Yeah, I think, obviously I am sad about what happened. I mean, at the end of the day, it caused turmoil in the markets. It had an impact on the reputation of the investment banking sector. I would say it caused a lot of people. It had a lot of, a big impact on people's livelihoods. I don't think it was definitely not the Lehman Brothers who were the cause of that, but they were the first to go. And so, that is essentially what opened the flood, brought the floodwaters. One of the things I liked about Lehman Brothers and maybe for the people who aren't so familiar, the listeners who aren't so familiar, to me, Lehman Brothers was a bank that looked a little bit more at how to innovate in their sector they were kind of seen as a little bit more the street kid versus the Goldman Sachs, more the golden boys. And I liked that mentality in the investment banking department that I was at. Unfortunately, that also resulted in sometimes pushing the boat out a little bit too much potentially. And that was one reason why I guess what happened.

But I did like that mentality to just look from a new perspective at what you could do in the world of finance and for a lot of products and a lot of M&A opportunities, it has actually brought a lot of value to investors, to companies, to economies. And so that was one of the reasons I decided to join. And I think one of the reasons why it's unfortunate that they had to be the first to go. But obviously, Lehman Brothers was also made of thousands and thousands of individuals and those individuals are elsewhere now and their creativity and innovative thinking have been brought there as well, I think.

(07:13) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And after that, you went on to crossover to consulting. Could you share more?

(07:17) Jelmer Ikink:

Yeah. So, although I learned a lot in banking, I realized it wasn't really for me. I like human interaction. And as an analyst, you really are really kind of an extension of your computer for a hundred hours a week. And so that was not really for me at the time. So decided to go to McKinsey where there is a lot of client interaction and the type of clients that you see there and the individuals that you meet there are really at port level and C suite level. So actually from a very young age onwards, you could get that type of look in the kitchen, and that is something that I really appreciated as well. I did projects all over the world in private equity and, the energy sector and so, listening to or understanding where those businesses want to go in terms of strategy or wanting the help of an outside party to understand where they should be going in the next 10 to 15 years, I think was very exciting. And I'm still seeing in The Financial Times from time to time, articles of clients that I work with who are now continuing to implement some of those ideas that they together with McKinsey Dunn had. And I think that's quite exciting.

(08:21) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. Well, my wife is also ex-McKinsey and she's also done both the eye banking and consulting route as well. I'm just kind of curious, you did both and obviously, you decided to do neither eventually. But I'm just curious, what did you take away from both of those experiences in general?

(08:34) Marker

(08:34) Jelmer Ikink:

I think it's good to have, at an early stage, a multitude of experiences especially at an early age, you can reverse course on certain career decisions you make. And so, doing that early on, I think is helpful. But I also didn't know at the time that VC, was, in a way, an amalgamation of those things, right? And that's what I really love about what we're doing right now with Fonxmont, but just the ecosystem in general, how it's been blossoming since the mid-nineties here in Southeast Asia or in Asia, in the mid-2000s, roughly, that you have the consulting part, which is, okay, when I become a part owner as a fund, how do I help grow a company? So that's the consulting part, but then there's also the IB part, which is, can I make a good return on the investment over time? And then, there's an entrepreneurial part, which is something I did before Foxmont. So it's really like a nice cross mix of those three things. And if I had known or if the ecosystem had been so evolved already at the time that I was doing banking or consulting, I might've just gone there and stayed.

(09:34) Jeremy Au:

And that's interesting, right? So there are two parts to it. The first part you said is, how's the amalgamation of VC? Also, you talk about the Asia side of it. Could you just quickly share how you eventually moved to Asia?

(09:43) Jelmer Ikink:

Yeah. So, I worked for McKinsey for a couple of years and McKinsey has this great program where they support you in your graduate program. I did that in the States. I worked. I studied law and diplomacy. As I mentioned earlier, understanding the more qualitative part of how the world functions came at a crossroads at the end of those two years. Like, what do I want to do? McKinsey has an offer for you to go back after your graduate degree. And so that was a very enticing offer. But I wanted to just make sure that was the decision I wanted to go for. And, I had worked in China as an intern in private equity right before my master's degree and really enjoyed that.

I liked the energy that there was in China at the time. That was the mid to late 2000s or it was 2005, or 2006 roughly. And so really enjoyed that. And wanted to see if I wanted to do more in the emerging market and got to talking to a number of people and one of those is a half Filipino, half Dutch friend I have. He lived in the Philippines at the time. I got to visit him and just was blown away by the country, and the opportunities that there are there. And essentially wanted to do the same thing as I was doing in China initially as an intern and afterward, as an investment manager, set up a small midsize fund, basically, that looks at midcap companies and tries to help them grow. Now that ended up being relatively difficult. So, we decided to set up our own businesses. So instead of investing in others, we invested in our own ideas. And one of those ideas was a co-living company. We started that in 2011, and grew that over the next seven years with from Singapore and from friends and family and from Philippine institutional investors. Kind of got that experience in the Philippines as well, what it's like to raise funds. And then in 2018, we sold the business to a local conglomerate and then tried again with the investment firm idea. And that's how Foxmont came about together with Franco, and Jesse as well.

(11:36) Jeremy Au:

So what was it like to found and co-found Foxmont?

(11:39) Jelmer Ikink:

Well, I will tell you a little bit about the story, and that maybe explains as well what the name stands for. So, we were just a group of friends and we liked the startup scene. Franco and Jesse have also had the startup experience through Grab, for example. And I mentioned mine, and so we got together all the time at the Fairmont and the Raffles, which is a single building in Makati, the hotels. And so, we sat there in the writer's bar and started talking a little bit about, okay, what can we do? What can we do to help the ecosystem here in the Philippines and have people go through an easier process than what we feel we had as entrepreneurs? So the idea then came about of setting up a small VC shop. We pulled a bit of money together of our own capital largely, and started meeting founders in that bar or, it's not a real bar. It's like a coffee lounge. And so that's where the month in Fox month came from. And uh, you know, I'm a big fan of foxes and it's a nice kind of analogy to how you sniff good deals and how you try to be the first to find a deal. And so we put the two together and that became Foxmont.

(12:47) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. Well, when you say coffee shop at large, it makes me think of Friends, like an episode of Friends.

(12:52) Jelmer Ikink:

Yeah, it was really kind of like that. And even with the founders and I think, you know, we sat on the couch together. We talked about their business initially. Sometimes it wasn't even about an investment, but just really kind of to help them explain what it's like to set up a business in the Philippines. And I think That's a little bit of the mindset that we still have at Foxmont. We are really trying to support founders, whether we invest in them or not, we really try to uplift the ecosystem here. Take dormant entrepreneurs, as I call them, people who would like to become an entrepreneur, but never really dared to take the step or the leap. We tried to help them in becoming a bit more comfortable about what it's like to become one. And then if we like the business, we will invest in it too.

(13:32) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, what was interesting is that you have this vision for Foxmont and the Philippines Franco also about his broader vision for the Philippines as well. I'm just kind of curious because Foxmont is for the Philippines and the Philippines as a market, even back in 2018, you know, Southeast Asia wasn't even hot in 2018 so I was kind of curious how you were thinking about that.

(30:28) Jelmer Ikink: Yeah. Definitely. As I said, when I came to the Philippines in 2011 and 2012, there was really no true market. I mean, we did the analysis for our presentations and such, and it was about 40 million in annual deal flow. That's nothing, and so it was difficult, it was a small market for sure. But I think 2018 is actually a nice start and the timing was quite lucky there. And you do need luck, obviously, but obviously for a lot of reasons. The pandemic was terrible for a lot of people, but what it did result in the Philippines is that it really made a leap from analog to digital. And, e-wallets went from, I think, 30 million to now 84 or 86 million wallet accounts, and that's just G-Cash. So that's a huge percentage of the Philippine population, which is around 115, 117 million. And you see that in a lot of other sectors in the Philippine economy as well, and commerce became e-commerce, payments became e-payments. And we're now at almost 50% , I believe, E payments as a percentage of total transactions. So it leapfrogged over those couple of years. And as a result, there are also a lot of business opportunities and startup opportunities that arose from that massive change. And in the last two years, we've seen each year more than a billion dollars invested in terms of deal flow and that's 25x over that 10-year period.

So I think the timing was good. We underestimated what that would do to the economy and the startup ecosystem. We're not so concerned about deal flow anymore because we see over a thousand companies a year at the moment and we invest in a year to date, we've invested in 13, and a couple of those are follow-on investments. So our selection process is quite stringent still. And so you can be selective and you can make good, high-quality investments in the Philippines now. And I think it's one of the reasons why we also release things like an annual VC report, why we are part of the Sinigang Valley Association to try to educate, not just Philippine stakeholders, but also regional and global stakeholders like, Hey, something really changed in the Philippines. And you might want to look at this because we think it's a good investment opportunity.

(32:32) Jeremy Au:

So what's interesting is that there's a story of Asia. And then the story is obviously Asia within that. And there's a story of the Philippines. That's one way to think about it, right? It's like, one level down, one level down. But I'm just kind of curious, how would you describe the story of the Philippines? Because I know you've gone out to fundraise from LPs, obviously even drama support for the ecosystem. And you've done a lot of the work actually in partnership to write the ecosystem reports that I previously reviewed in our past episodes to kind of explain and talk about the transit ecosystem. I'm just kind of curious, how would you describe that story? Both the positives and the things that still need to be worked on.

(33:02) Jelmer Ikink:

It's hard to summarize, but a couple of things like fundamentally, from a macroeconomic perspective, the Philippines has actually been doing really well over the last two decades. On average, it's like five to 7 percent GDP growth year to date. We're at almost 6%, it's 5.9 percent GDP growth year over year, and that's the fastest in Southeast Asia. I think one of the fastest in Asia after India. And that's not necessarily something new but it's underappreciated, I would say. So the macroeconomic side is actually a given, but we do typically need to educate people about it.

I think, secondly, just to share a number of people, a number of Filipinos that are in the Philippines, that are well educated, technologically and digitally savvy, speak English, speaks to a lot of investment opportunities for MNCs, but also regional startups who wanna expand to another country in Southeast Asia. And then another point on, population, as I mentioned, is one of the youngest populations in the world on average. And so in the coming couple of decades, we have a demographic that is looking to be consuming a lot more per person because the mean income is going up, but also just as a sheer population because the population is still growing. And that's something that's not the trend globally. I mean, there are a number of countries in Asia, Japan, Korea, and China, to a certain extent where we see significant population reductions. And I think that demographic dividend we can actually really reap the benefits off as a population in the Philippines, but also as a fund. Investment opportunities abound. And if you look at a seven-year investment horizon, you're already starting to make use of that demographic dividend.

Then a third one is the stakeholders. So you have founders and investors. I think in terms of founders, we're seeing the so-called sea turtles, Filipinos who lived abroad and are moving to the Philippines, seeing opportunity there and setting up their own businesses. Increasingly, local Filipinos who were born and raised in the Philippines are daring to make that jump into entrepreneurship as well. And that's because they see good role models in the startups that have come up over the last decade. They see curricula in schools are increasingly also including entrepreneurship classes and private capital market courses. And so that really helps them get a little bit more familiar about what it takes to be an entrepreneur, how to set up a startup, how to fundraise, those types of things. And we see the caliber of those types of entrepreneurs, actually, like even those one-on-one courses really help a lot. So that's really positive. And the opportunity space has grown as well, given what I just mentioned about the inflection point during the pandemic. So. That's from a founder's perspective.

Then investors, parties like ourselves, we see a lot of, we also see a lot of the conglomerates, either start or grow their own corporate VC businesses, and that's super helpful. And there's a third stakeholder that recently started, which is the government. The government now has, in addition to, you know, typical grant programs, they also have the startup venture fund, which is managed by the NDC. And they invest around 200, 000 into startups as well. And they recently made their first investment. So that's enabling growth as well. And we love seeing that type of support from the government too. That is it from the stakeholder perspective.

(36:13) Jelmer Ikink:

Then lastly, I would say the sectors are just growing. Initially, we saw a lot of growth in fintech, e-commerce, those types of things, but B2B is really growing very fast within Fintech, but also outside of Fintech, B2B businesses, we see a rise in homegrown B2C brands doing well, like Pickup Coffee or a Colourette. Filipinos, historically, were buying, typically foreign products, but right now they're proud to buy their own homegrown brand of coffee or homegrown brand of makeup, and that's really amazing to see. And then a third sector that we see growing is things in sustainability and other innovative, very Filipino solutions to Philippine problems. And I think that's very exciting to see as well that things we never really thought of things we haven't seen abroad are now being built in the Philippines just to fix a problem that exists just in the Philippines.

(37:04) Jeremy Au:

What are some problems that you think are worth fixing in the Philippines?

(37:07) Jelmer Ikink:

I mean, as in any country, I think there's a lot, but there's a lot of growth generally through digitization, but Philippine labor used to be very cheap and it is still relatively cheap. So if you look at the B2B site, historically, it was very easy for enterprises to, if there was a problem, you throw more warm bodies at it, you know, more employees to fix the problem. And that has resulted in the productivity of the Philippine workforce actually being relatively steady. It hasn't increased so much over the years. And so, what we're seeing now is that you know, digital adoption B2B SaaS platforms are being increasingly integrated into these enterprises. And so, the Filipino workforce can actually become more productive. They don't have to do these roads, and repetitive tasks anymore and can start really doing more complex work that really adds a lot of value to the businesses. So that's, I think one area that we've seen one problem that has been addressed a little bit over time.

And I think there's a lot of talk about the BPO sector. In the Philippines, which has historically and still continues to be a big driver of GDP growth. The rise of AI and generative AI can be a threat, but you can also see it as an opportunity because what we as startup investors have seen is that, a lot of talented computer science majors actually leave to do a relatively simplistic BPO job, whereas, in my view, they're underutilized with their skills. And so if they can either make their job at the BPO company more productive and more value-additive by removing some of the repetitive tasks that AI can do or they move to help grow a startup company or set up their own startup. I think that could really be positive also to the Philippine economy.

(38:48) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. You know, earlier you shared that VC is a great combination of both your investment banking, as well as consulting skillset. Can you share a little bit more about what that means?

(38:56) Jelmer Ikink:

Yeah. As a consultant, criticism in the past, I mean, I think they've improved it, so I don't wanna, I haven't been in consulting for a while, but in the past, the criticism was that you make a report, you present that to the board, or c-suite management, and then it ends up in a drawer somewhere gathering dust. What you're doing in VC is that you still blueprint that strategy, you know, that growth strategy together with the founder. Like, this is what we believe is our investment thesis. This is how we think we can grow the business new products or geographies, but then you work with the founder to implement it over the next five to seven years as well because you're a shareholder and therefore an economic beneficiary of that growth as well.

So you really kind of put your money where your mouth is. And that's one part I really enjoy. I learned that in consulting, but you now apply it in a way where it benefits the business and your fund returns. So that's the consulting part where that comes into play. I For banking, as I mentioned, you just become very comfortable with reading and interpreting numbers or trying to understand what the underlying problem is and how you want to improve things in an organization. So I think that's the benefit of how investment banking comes into play. Another feature, I was in M&A at the time is that's a typical exit for our portfolio companies. So if you understand a little bit what a buyer in an M&A transaction looks for, then that helps you in your exit strategy as well for the front. And entrepreneurship, at the end of the day, we're also in a way of a startup. We're a five-year-old startup. Foxmont is we're a fund manager that didn't exist six years ago. And so we're learning through that as well. And I'm trying to understand what it is to be an entrepreneur in a VC firm.

(40:37) Jeremy Au:

What are some of those learnings for Foxmont as a learning VC? What are some lessons that you've learned over this time, past six years?

(40:43) Marker

(40:43) Jelmer Ikink:

I think it's interesting to actually see how much what we set up was a little kind of needed or demanded from entrepreneurs. It's really gratifying to see how just the other week we had our Foxmont summit, which is an annual event that we have with the founders that we invested in and they come together. We invite experts in particular fields. It could be a motivational coach, could be a professional athlete, could be finance, or H. R. Just experts in all types of fields and try to give their expertise to our founders. That's one part of the day. The other part of the day is that we really try to have our founders mingle with each other and find synergies within the Foxmont community and just seeing every year, how that grows that ecosystem, what we call the Foxmont Mafia, is just super exciting to see. And I think one learning is that I had never expected that it would take off so much over such a short period of time. And it's a testament to our founders because, at the end of the day, we invest in them. We help them, and support them as much as we can. But the founder is the one with the idea and the one who's actually executing together with their team. So to me, one learning is that the entrepreneurial spirit and quality are there in the Philippines. It just needs to be activated by stakeholders like us and other VC firms in the region and in the country.

(41:59) Jeremy Au:

Awesome. Could you share about a time that you personally have been brave?

(42:02) Jelmer Ikink:

I think there are layers of braveness, but it was a difficult decision for me to make the leap from a relatively certain career at McKinsey to initially going to China and not knowing what to expect. And then moving to the Philippines and not knowing what to expect, right? Those are leaps of faith that you need to make between a certain career path and an uncertain volatile rollercoaster. And it has definitely been a rollercoaster, but I would never trade it. So taking a leap of faith and not taking the path of least resistance, just helps you grow so fast as a human.

(42:34) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. Could you share about how you went about making that decision?

(42:37) Jelmer Ikink:

I talked to a lot of people. I did a lot of personal thinking. I projected myself 10 years on and thought, Okay, in 10 years from now, where would I rather be? And what stories would I rather have in my little knapsack of life experiences? And for me, that just resulted in making the decision to go with kind of the unknown.

(42:57) Jeremy Au:

I guess it's almost about 10 years since then?

(43:00) Jelmer Ikink:

It's been 15. Yeah. Well, it's been 10 years since the move to more than 10 years since the move to the Philippines, but it's been 15 since China.

(43:08) Jeremy Au:

How do you think that measured up against your initial projection?

(43:10) Jelmer Ikink:

Some parts better, some parts worse, I would say just generally because it was the unknown, I really had such little expectations and it made me a lot more mindful as well. Just experiencing, and understanding what was going on at the moment as opposed to always chasing like a corporate career, knowing where I would want to be in the next four years from now. It makes you chase that target as opposed to what I'm doing now, what I've done as an entrepreneur. Like I said, it's a roller coaster. You kind of don't know what's around the corner. So it's quite exciting. It stays exciting.

(43:39) Jeremy Au:

As you think about that, I'm so curious when you project yourself 10 years from today. Have you thought about that? What aspects do you think are going to be there?

(43:46) Jelmer Ikink:

Yeah. We think about it as Foxmont. I think about it personally. I think about it in my personal, like, personal relationship with my wife. I think continuing to have that open mindset, that curiosity, walking around with my hands behind my back. I want to keep that curiosity with Foxmont specifically. Would just love to keep growing. We think that the fund size that we have now and that we're looking to have in the coming years. It's still just a drop in the bucket for the potential that there is in the Philippines. Now, we don't want to be the only party. We think there's there should continue to be a nice balance of players in the ecosystem. But we want to be a key party that has a reputation for helping founders grow their businesses and also for regional investors to see us as a bridge to the Philippines, a party that understands the Philippines. And I think so many areas where we, as a fund manager could grow in the Philippines. The ecosystem is maturing. So over time, you could slowly go towards more growth. There are other asset classes that you could potentially invest in over time on other instruments. So, yeah, there's a lot of ideas. But at the end of the day, we don't know what's around the corner. And we're at the moment, just focused on getting good returns for our current funds.

(44:53) Jeremy Au:

You mentioned that curiosity is really important to you still. Can you share about how you still see or nurture your curiosity today?

(45:00) Jelmer Ikink:

Whenever I hear a strong statement, I just almost viscerally try to think of the exact opposite and see if I believe that perspective as well. It's easy relatively for an investor who sometimes burns your fingers. Sometimes you make a really great bet. At the end of the day, it's not like there's a lot of components and there's even luck involved in whether an investment is good or ends up being good or not. And I think just keeping that open mindset, like maybe it didn't work last time, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't invest in a similar product or business this time. I think keeping that open-mindedness is very important for a fund manager.

(45:35) Jeremy Au:

On that note, thank you so much for sharing your journey, Jelmer. I'd love to summarize the three big takeaways I got from this conversation. First of all, thank you so much for sharing about that early childhood image of you walking around with your hands behind your back, being curious around the playground, just been amazing to hear that curiosity and that spirit of learning carry over into your major, becoming an investment banker to becoming a consultant and being doing a big sentence, your career. So really interesting to hear that set of trade-offs, but also some decisions and how you went about making those decisions.

Secondly, thank you so much for sharing about Foxmont and a vision, the coffee and friends scene and also how the name came about. It's interesting to hear about your vision for the Philippines and some of the problems that are worth tackling right now, but also the solutions that you're seeing starting to emerge and the type of founders that you're starting to see in the local ecosystem.

Lastly, thanks so much for sharing your personal story of bravery. I really enjoyed hearing those moments about how making a move to Asia was a big leap in the dark for you, but it was something that you worked out and figured out how to do, and really kept that spirit of learning throughout. So, thank you so much, Jelmer.

(46:34) Jelmer Ikink:

Thank you. It was great being on the podcast.

"Ketika saya datang ke Filipina pada tahun 2011, pasarnya masih kecil. Kami melakukan analisis untuk presentasi kami dan ada sekitar $40 juta dalam aliran kesepakatan tahunan. Pandemi ini sangat buruk bagi banyak orang, tetapi hal ini membuat Filipina melompat dari analog ke digital. E-wallet meningkat dari 30 juta akun menjadi 86 juta akun, dan itu baru G-Cash. Itu adalah persentase yang sangat besar dari populasi Filipina, yang berjumlah sekitar 117 juta. Anda juga dapat melihat hal itu di banyak sektor lain dalam perekonomian Filipina. Hal ini terjadi dalam beberapa tahun, dan sebagai hasilnya, banyak peluang bisnis dan peluang startup yang muncul dari perubahan besar tersebut. Dalam dua tahun terakhir, kami telah melihat setiap tahun lebih dari satu miliar dolar diinvestasikan dalam hal aliran transaksi dan itu 25X lipat selama 10 tahun tersebut." - Jelmer Ikink

 

"Sangat menarik untuk melihat seberapa besar apa yang kami siapkan dibutuhkan atau diminta oleh para pengusaha. Beberapa minggu yang lalu, kami mengadakan Foxmont Summit, yang merupakan acara tahunan yang kami adakan dengan para pendiri yang kami investasikan. Kami mengundang para ahli di bidang tertentu seperti pelatih motivasi, atlet profesional, ahli keuangan atau SDM, dan mereka mencoba berbagi keahlian mereka dengan para pendiri kami. Kami juga berusaha agar para pendiri kami berbaur satu sama lain dan menemukan sinergi di dalam komunitas Foxmont dan sangat menyenangkan melihat bagaimana "Foxmont Mafia" tumbuh setiap tahun. Saya tidak pernah menyangka bahwa hal ini akan berkembang pesat dalam waktu yang singkat. Ini adalah bukti bagi para pendiri kami karena, pada akhirnya, kami berinvestasi pada mereka. Kami membantu dan mendukung mereka sebanyak yang kami bisa, tetapi merekalah yang memiliki ide dan yang mengeksekusinya bersama tim mereka. Jadi bagi saya, satu pembelajaran adalah bahwa semangat dan kualitas kewirausahaan ada di sini di Filipina. Ini hanya perlu diaktifkan oleh para pemangku kepentingan seperti kami dan perusahaan modal ventura lainnya di wilayah dan negara ini." - Jelmer Ikink

 

"Seperti di negara mana pun, ada banyak masalah, tetapi ada juga banyak pertumbuhan melalui digitalisasi. Tenaga kerja Filipina dulunya sangat murah dan masih relatif murah, jadi jika Anda melihat situs B2B, secara historis, jika ada masalah, perusahaan akan mengerahkan lebih banyak tenaga kerja, dan lebih banyak karyawan untuk menyelesaikan masalah tersebut. Dan hal ini mengakibatkan produktivitas tenaga kerja Filipina relatif stabil. Tidak banyak meningkat selama bertahun-tahun. Jadi, apa yang kita lihat sekarang adalah adopsi digital, platform SaaS B2B semakin diintegrasikan ke dalam perusahaan-perusahaan ini sehingga tenaga kerja Filipina dapat menjadi lebih produktif. Mereka tidak perlu melakukan tugas-tugas yang berulang-ulang lagi dan dapat mulai melakukan pekerjaan yang lebih kompleks yang menambah banyak nilai bagi bisnis. Jadi, itu adalah satu area, satu masalah yang telah diatasi dari waktu ke waktu."

Jelmer Ikink, Founding Partner Foxmont Capital Partners, dan Jeremy Au membahas tiga topik utama:

1. Keingintahuan Masa Kecil (Lehman Brothers & McKinsey): Jelmer bercerita tentang kebiasaan masa kecilnya yang suka berjalan-jalan dengan tangan di belakang punggung dan mengajukan pertanyaan. Keingintahuan yang mengakar ini diterjemahkan ke dalam kehidupan akademisnya, yang pada awalnya menekuni bidang keuangan untuk studi sarjananya serta hukum dan diplomasi untuk gelar masternya. Dia berbicara tentang transisinya dari perbankan investasi di Lehman Brothers ke konsultan manajemen McKinsey hingga usaha kewirausahaan di Tiongkok dan Filipina.

2. Visi Pendirian Foxmont: Jelmer membahas bagaimana mereka memutuskan nama Foxmont Capital Partners setelah terinspirasi oleh sifat rubah yang cerdas serta tempat pertemuan rutin mereka di hotel Fairmont dan Raffles. Ia menyoroti komitmen Foxmont untuk mengembangkan lanskap kewirausahaan di Filipina. Ia juga berbicara tentang keberhasilan acara tahunan Foxmont Summit yang mempertemukan para pendiri ekosistem.

3. Proyeksi Kehidupan 10 Tahun ke Depan: Jelmer menyelami risiko signifikan yang dia ambil dalam memutuskan untuk pindah ke Asia dan menjauh dari jalur karier yang lebih pasti. Dia menggunakan teknik memproyeksikan dirinya sepuluh tahun ke depan untuk menimbang di mana dia ingin berada dan cerita apa yang ingin dia kumpulkan dalam hidupnya. Dia mengakui bahwa meskipun beberapa bagian dari perjalanannya ternyata lebih baik (dan lebih buruk) dari yang diharapkan, dia sengaja memilih untuk lebih memperhatikan pengalamannya dengan lebih sedikit ekspektasi terhadap dirinya sendiri.

Jeremy dan Jelmer juga berbicara tentang perubahan masa depan dalam lanskap investasi Filipina, pertumbuhan makroekonomi negara tersebut, dan peran keberuntungan dalam VC.

 

Didukung oleh Hive Health

Apakah Anda sedang melakukan ekspansi atau meluncurkan bisnis di Filipina? Memastikan kesehatan karyawan Anda adalah kunci untuk menarik dan mempertahankan talenta terbaik. Di situlah Hive Health hadir, terutama untuk perusahaan rintisan dan bisnis kecil hingga menengah. Mereka berspesialisasi dalam menyediakan rencana perawatan kesehatan berkualitas tinggi dan bebas gangguan yang disesuaikan dengan tempat kerja Anda. Pelajari lebih lanjut di www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:59) Jeremy Au:

Hei, Jelmer. Senang sekali Anda bisa hadir di acara ini. Anda mewakili Foxmont dan begitu banyak hal yang baik. Franco pernah tampil di acara ini sebelumnya dan mengatakan bahwa Anda akan menjadi perspektif yang luar biasa untuk berbagi pengalaman perjalanan Anda. Saya ingin sekali Anda memperkenalkan diri.

(02:10) Jelmer Ikink:

Bagus. Ya. Terima kasih telah menerimaku, Jeremy. Saya berharap untuk memenuhi rintangan yang Franco tetapkan untuk saya. Aku Jelmer. Aku memang salah satu mitra pendiri Foxmont. Kami memulai Foxmont pada tahun 2018. Ini adalah perusahaan modal ventura yang berfokus di Filipina. Kami memulainya dengan keyakinan bahwa harus ada pemain di Filipina yang benar-benar memiliki pendiri pertama dan sebagai wirausahawan, dan saya yakin kami akan membicarakannya. Kami berpikir bahwa kami berpotensi menjadi sekelompok orang yang baik untuk membantu para pendiri di Filipina. Saya pribadi memiliki latar belakang di bidang konsultasi. Saya bekerja di McKinsey pada awal karir saya. Saya juga sempat bekerja di Lehman Brothers Investment Banking dan menyadari bahwa dunia perbankan bukan untuk saya. Jadi saya pindah ke Cina di mana saya melakukan ekuitas swasta selama beberapa tahun. Kemudian saya pindah ke Filipina dan mendirikan perusahaan saya sendiri. Dan melalui proses tersebut, saya benar-benar memahami tantangan dan hal-hal yang benar-benar dibutuhkan oleh para pengusaha di Filipina untuk mengembangkan bisnis mereka, dan itulah sedikit dari misi atau awal mula berdirinya Foxmont.

(03:08) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi, seperti apa Anda saat kecil?

(03:10) Jelmer Ikink:

Saya sangat penasaran. Orang tua saya selalu mengatakan bahwa saya memiliki kedua tangan di punggung saya, dan saya akan berjalan-jalan ke mana-mana dan bertanya kepada orang-orang sepanjang waktu. Dan mengapa, mengapa, mengapa? Hal ini juga masih ada di rapor saya di sekolah, jadi saya cukup yakin bahwa saya juga mengganggu banyak orang. Tapi ya, rasa ingin tahu selalu ada dalam darah saya.

(03:29) Jeremy Au:

Saya menyukai ide dan gambaran mental Anda berjalan dengan tangan di belakang punggung, seperti seorang, jadi seperti bos, seperti, seperti taman bermain ini adalah domain saya.

(03:37) Jelmer Ikink:

Yah, sebenarnya lebih seperti rasa ingin tahu dan mencoba memahami apa yang terjadi di sekitar saya, saya kira.

(03:42) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Dan yang menarik adalah, Anda tahu, apa yang Anda pelajari saat masih kecil dan saat remaja, apa yang Anda pikirkan tentang apa yang akan Anda lakukan saat Anda dewasa nanti?

(03:51) Jelmer Ikink:

Saya selalu menyukai angka-angka ketika masih muda. Saya tidak memiliki konsep tentang apa sebenarnya profesi itu, tetapi saya selalu mengatakan bahwa saya ingin menjadi seorang insinyur. Saya suka bekerja dengan angka. Arsitektur, saya juga sangat menyukai estetika, tetapi juga karena arsitektur memiliki banyak komponen struktural dan numerik. Kemudian, ketika saya bersekolah di sekolah menengah di Belanda, dan saya menyadari, Anda tahu, saya seperti diperkenalkan ke dunia keuangan dan bisnis dan ekonomi benar-benar membuat saya benar-benar memahami, atau setidaknya bagi saya, menggabungkan banyak faktor dan fitur tentang bagaimana dunia bekerja dan bagaimana orang berinteraksi satu sama lain. Dan sekali lagi, juga komponen numerik. Jadi, saya sangat menyukai hal tersebut dan memutuskan untuk menekuninya. Jadi, untuk kuliah saya, sarjana saya, saya belajar keuangan dan bisnis dan kemudian untuk master saya, saya mengambil jurusan hukum dan diplomasi. Jadi, saya benar-benar memiliki lebih banyak komponen kualitatif untuk itu dan benar-benar menikmati keduanya.

(04:41) Jeremy Au:

Jadi, bagaimana Anda akhirnya memilih pekerjaan pertama Anda?

(04:42) Jelmer Ikink:

Oh, itu pertanyaan yang bagus. Jadi maksud saya, saya rasa ini sebenarnya sedikit, agak standar. Jadi saya belajar keuangan dan itu terjadi pada saat perbankan, perbankan investasi benar-benar merupakan pekerjaan yang sangat dibutuhkan. Jadi saya melamar ke beberapa bank investasi dan Lehman Brothers pada awalnya. Jadi, tidak terlalu banyak introspeksi yang terlibat dalam hal itu, tapi itu mengajarkan saya banyak hal. Menurut saya.

(05:05) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Apa yang kau pelajari?

(05:06) Jelmer Ikink:

Pertama, untuk benar-benar memahami cara melihat bisnis, untuk menjalani bisnis dengan melihat laporan keuangan dan analis, rekaman, pelaporan triwulanan, menguji apa yang dikatakan orang tentang apa yang dikatakan manajemen, dan apakah itu sesuai dengan apa yang kita lihat dalam angka-angka, memahami bagaimana model bisnis berputar dari waktu ke waktu dan bagaimana sumber pendapatan baru ditambahkan dari waktu ke waktu. Jadi, ini adalah perpanjangan dari gelar sarjana saya untuk benar-benar mempraktikkan apa yang saya pelajari secara teori di sana.

(05:37) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi, menurut saya yang menarik adalah bahwa Lehman Brothers, pada masa kejayaannya, merupakan bank investasi yang sangat populer dan besar, seperti yang Anda katakan, dan kemudian setelah itu, sayangnya, menurut saya, bank tersebut sudah tidak ada lagi saat ini. Saya agak penasaran karena Anda memiliki sejarah tentang hal itu, apa pendapat Anda tentang hal itu?

(05:50) Jelmer Ikink:

Ya, saya pikir, tentu saja saya sedih dengan apa yang terjadi. Maksud saya, pada akhirnya, hal itu menyebabkan gejolak di pasar. Hal itu berdampak pada reputasi sektor perbankan investasi. Menurut saya, hal itu menyebabkan banyak orang. Dampaknya sangat besar, berdampak besar pada mata pencaharian masyarakat. Saya rasa bukan Lehman Brothers yang menjadi penyebabnya, namun mereka adalah yang pertama. Jadi, pada dasarnya itulah yang membuka banjir, membawa air bah. Salah satu hal yang saya sukai dari Lehman Brothers dan mungkin bagi orang-orang yang tidak begitu mengenalnya, para pendengar yang tidak begitu mengenalnya, bagi saya, Lehman Brothers adalah sebuah bank yang melihat lebih jauh bagaimana berinovasi di sektor mereka, mereka terlihat seperti anak jalanan dibandingkan dengan Goldman Sachs, anak emas. Dan saya menyukai mentalitas tersebut di departemen investment banking tempat saya bekerja. Sayangnya, hal itu juga mengakibatkan kadang-kadang mendorong perahu keluar sedikit terlalu banyak. Dan itulah salah satu alasan mengapa saya bisa menebak apa yang terjadi.

Namun saya menyukai mentalitas untuk melihat dari sudut pandang baru tentang apa yang dapat Anda lakukan di dunia keuangan dan untuk banyak produk dan banyak peluang M&A, hal ini benar-benar membawa banyak nilai bagi investor, perusahaan, dan ekonomi. Itulah salah satu alasan saya memutuskan untuk bergabung. Dan saya pikir salah satu alasan mengapa sangat disayangkan bahwa mereka harus menjadi yang pertama pergi. Namun yang jelas, Lehman Brothers juga terdiri dari ribuan orang dan orang-orang tersebut kini berada di tempat lain dan kreativitas serta pemikiran inovatif mereka telah dibawa ke sana juga, menurut saya.

(07:13) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Dan setelah itu, Anda beralih ke bidang konsultasi. Bisa Anda ceritakan lebih lanjut?

(07:17) Jelmer Ikink:

Ya. Jadi, meskipun saya belajar banyak di dunia perbankan, saya menyadari bahwa itu bukan untuk saya. Saya suka interaksi manusia. Dan sebagai seorang analis, Anda benar-benar menjadi perpanjangan tangan dari komputer Anda selama seratus jam dalam seminggu. Jadi, hal itu tidak cocok untuk saya pada saat itu. Jadi saya memutuskan untuk bekerja di McKinsey di mana ada banyak interaksi dengan klien dan jenis klien yang Anda temui di sana dan orang-orang yang Anda temui di sana benar-benar berada di level port level dan C suite. Jadi sebenarnya dari usia yang sangat muda dan seterusnya, Anda bisa mendapatkan tampilan seperti itu di dapur, dan itu adalah sesuatu yang sangat saya hargai juga. Saya mengerjakan proyek-proyek di seluruh dunia di bidang ekuitas swasta dan, sektor energi dan sebagainya, mendengarkan atau memahami ke mana arah bisnis-bisnis tersebut dalam hal strategi atau menginginkan bantuan pihak luar untuk memahami ke mana mereka harus melangkah dalam 10 hingga 15 tahun ke depan, menurut saya sangat menarik. Dan saya masih melihat di The Financial Times dari waktu ke waktu, artikel-artikel tentang klien yang bekerja sama dengan saya yang sekarang terus menerapkan beberapa ide yang mereka miliki bersama McKinsey Dunn. Dan menurut saya itu cukup menarik.

(08:21) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Nah, istri saya juga mantan karyawan McKinsey dan dia juga pernah bekerja di bank mata dan konsultan. Saya hanya ingin tahu, Anda pernah melakukan keduanya dan tentu saja, Anda memutuskan untuk tidak melakukan keduanya pada akhirnya. Tapi saya hanya ingin tahu, apa yang Anda dapatkan dari kedua pengalaman tersebut secara umum?

(08:34) Penanda

(08:34) Jelmer Ikink:

Saya pikir akan sangat baik untuk memiliki, pada tahap awal, banyak pengalaman, terutama pada usia dini, Anda dapat membalikkan arah pada keputusan karier tertentu yang Anda buat. Jadi, melakukan hal tersebut sejak dini, menurut saya sangat membantu. Namun, saya juga tidak tahu pada saat itu bahwa VC, sedikit banyak, merupakan gabungan dari semua hal tersebut, bukan? Dan itulah yang sangat saya sukai dari apa yang kami lakukan saat ini dengan Fonxmont, tetapi juga ekosistem secara umum, bagaimana ekosistem ini telah berkembang sejak pertengahan tahun sembilan puluhan di Asia Tenggara atau di Asia, pada pertengahan tahun 2000-an, secara kasarnya, Anda memiliki bagian konsultasi, yaitu, oke, ketika saya menjadi bagian dari pemilik modal, bagaimana cara saya membantu mengembangkan sebuah perusahaan? Jadi, itulah bagian konsultasi, tetapi kemudian ada juga bagian IB, yaitu, bisakah saya menghasilkan laba yang baik atas investasi dari waktu ke waktu? Dan kemudian, ada bagian kewirausahaan, yang merupakan sesuatu yang saya lakukan sebelum di Foxmont. Jadi, ini benar-benar perpaduan yang bagus dari ketiga hal tersebut. Dan jika saya tahu atau jika ekosistemnya sudah sangat berkembang pada saat saya bekerja di bidang perbankan atau konsultan, saya mungkin akan tetap bekerja di sana.

(09:34) Jeremy Au:

Dan itu menarik, bukan? Jadi ada dua bagian untuk itu. Bagian pertama yang Anda katakan adalah, bagaimana penggabungan VC? Anda juga berbicara tentang sisi Asia. Bisakah Anda ceritakan dengan cepat bagaimana Anda akhirnya pindah ke Asia?

(09:43) Jelmer Ikink:

Ya. Jadi, saya bekerja di McKinsey selama beberapa tahun dan McKinsey memiliki program yang luar biasa di mana mereka mendukung Anda dalam program pascasarjana. Saya melakukan itu di Amerika. Aku bekerja. Saya belajar hukum dan diplomasi. Seperti yang saya sebutkan sebelumnya, memahami bagian yang lebih kualitatif tentang bagaimana dunia berfungsi muncul di persimpangan jalan pada akhir dua tahun itu. Seperti, apa yang ingin saya lakukan? McKinsey menawarkan Anda untuk kembali setelah lulus. Dan itu adalah tawaran yang sangat menarik. Namun, saya ingin memastikan bahwa itulah keputusan yang ingin saya ambil. Dan, saya pernah bekerja di Tiongkok sebagai pekerja magang di bidang ekuitas swasta tepat sebelum meraih gelar master dan saya sangat menikmatinya.

Saya menyukai energi yang ada di Tiongkok pada saat itu. Itu adalah pertengahan hingga akhir tahun 2000-an atau sekitar tahun 2005, atau 2006. Dan saya sangat menikmatinya. Saya ingin melihat apakah saya ingin melakukan lebih banyak hal di pasar negara berkembang dan berbicara dengan sejumlah orang dan salah satunya adalah teman saya yang setengah Filipina, setengah Belanda. Dia tinggal di Filipina pada saat itu. Saya mengunjunginya dan saya sangat terpesona dengan negara ini, dan peluang yang ada di sana. Dan pada dasarnya ingin melakukan hal yang sama seperti yang saya lakukan di Tiongkok pada awalnya sebagai pekerja magang dan setelah itu, sebagai manajer investasi, mendirikan sebuah dana investasi kecil, pada dasarnya, yang mengamati perusahaan-perusahaan kelas menengah dan mencoba membantu mereka tumbuh. Hal ini ternyata relatif sulit. Jadi, kami memutuskan untuk mendirikan bisnis kami sendiri. Jadi, alih-alih berinvestasi pada orang lain, kami berinvestasi pada ide-ide kami sendiri. Dan salah satu ide tersebut adalah perusahaan co-living. Kami memulainya pada tahun 2011, dan mengembangkannya selama tujuh tahun ke depan dengan bantuan dari Singapura, teman dan keluarga, serta investor institusional Filipina. Kami juga mendapatkan pengalaman di Filipina, bagaimana rasanya menggalang dana. Kemudian pada tahun 2018, kami menjual bisnis tersebut kepada konglomerat lokal dan kemudian mencoba lagi dengan ide perusahaan investasi. Dan begitulah cara Foxmont muncul bersama Franco, dan juga Jesse.

(11:36) Jeremy Au:

Jadi, bagaimana rasanya mendirikan dan ikut mendirikan Foxmont?

(11:39) Jelmer Ikink:

Baiklah, saya akan menceritakan sedikit tentang ceritanya, dan mungkin bisa menjelaskan apa arti dari nama tersebut. Jadi, kami hanyalah sekelompok teman dan kami menyukai dunia startup. Franco dan Jesse juga sudah memiliki pengalaman startup melalui Grab, misalnya. Dan saya menyebutkan pengalaman saya, jadi kami sering berkumpul bersama di Fairmont dan Raffles, yang merupakan satu gedung di Makati, hotel-hotel tersebut. Jadi, kami duduk di sana di bar penulis dan mulai berbicara sedikit tentang, oke, apa yang bisa kita lakukan? Apa yang bisa kita lakukan untuk membantu ekosistem di Filipina dan membuat orang-orang menjalani proses yang lebih mudah dibandingkan dengan apa yang kami rasakan sebagai pengusaha? Maka muncullah ide untuk mendirikan sebuah perusahaan modal ventura kecil. Kami mengumpulkan sedikit uang dari modal kami sendiri, dan mulai bertemu dengan para pendiri di bar, atau, ini bukan bar sungguhan. Itu seperti ruang tunggu kopi. Dan dari situlah asal mula nama Bulan Rubah. Dan uh, Anda tahu, saya adalah penggemar berat rubah dan ini adalah analogi yang bagus untuk bagaimana Anda mengendus penawaran yang bagus dan bagaimana Anda mencoba untuk menjadi yang pertama dalam menemukan kesepakatan. Jadi kami menggabungkan keduanya dan jadilah Foxmont.

(12:47) Jeremy Au:

Menakjubkan. Nah, ketika Anda mengatakan kedai kopi pada umumnya, itu membuat saya teringat pada Friends, seperti sebuah episode Friends.

(12:52) Jelmer Ikink:

Ya, memang seperti itu. Dan bahkan dengan para pendiri dan saya pikir, Anda tahu, kami duduk di sofa bersama. Kami berbicara tentang bisnis mereka pada awalnya. Kadang-kadang bahkan bukan tentang investasi, tetapi hanya untuk membantu mereka menjelaskan bagaimana rasanya mendirikan bisnis di Filipina. Dan saya rasa itulah sedikit pola pikir yang masih kami miliki di Foxmont. Kami benar-benar berusaha mendukung para pendiri, baik dengan berinvestasi atau tidak, kami benar-benar berusaha meningkatkan ekosistem di sini. Ambil contoh para wirausahawan yang tidak aktif, seperti yang saya sebut, orang-orang yang ingin menjadi wirausahawan, tetapi tidak pernah benar-benar berani mengambil langkah atau lompatan. Kami mencoba membantu mereka untuk menjadi sedikit lebih nyaman tentang bagaimana rasanya menjadi seorang pengusaha. Dan kemudian jika kami menyukai bisnis tersebut, kami akan berinvestasi di dalamnya juga.

(13:32) Jeremy Au:

Ya, yang menarik adalah bahwa Anda memiliki visi untuk Foxmont dan Filipina, Franco juga memiliki visi yang lebih luas untuk Filipina. Saya agak penasaran karena Foxmont adalah untuk Filipina dan Filipina sebagai pasar, bahkan pada tahun 2018, Anda tahu, Asia Tenggara bahkan tidak terlalu panas di tahun 2018, jadi saya agak penasaran bagaimana Anda memikirkan hal itu.

(30:28) Jelmer Ikink: Ya. Tentu saja. Seperti yang saya katakan, ketika saya datang ke Filipina pada tahun 2011 dan 2012, tidak ada pasar yang sebenarnya. Maksud saya, kami melakukan analisis untuk presentasi kami dan semacamnya, dan itu adalah sekitar 40 juta dalam aliran kesepakatan tahunan. Itu bukan apa-apa, dan memang sulit, itu adalah pasar yang kecil. Namun saya pikir tahun 2018 sebenarnya merupakan awal yang baik dan waktunya cukup beruntung. Dan Anda memang membutuhkan keberuntungan, tentu saja, tapi jelas untuk banyak alasan. Pandemi ini sangat buruk bagi banyak orang, tetapi apa yang terjadi di Filipina adalah bahwa negara ini benar-benar membuat lompatan dari analog ke digital. Dan, e-wallet meningkat dari, menurut saya, 30 juta menjadi 84 atau 86 juta akun dompet, dan itu hanya G-Cash. Jadi, itu adalah persentase yang sangat besar dari populasi Filipina, yang berjumlah sekitar 115 atau 117 juta. Dan Anda bisa melihat hal ini di banyak sektor lain dalam perekonomian Filipina juga, dan perdagangan menjadi e-commerce, pembayaran menjadi pembayaran elektronik. Dan kami sekarang hampir mencapai 50%, saya yakin, pembayaran elektronik sebagai persentase dari total transaksi. Jadi, hal ini telah melesat dalam beberapa tahun. Dan sebagai hasilnya, ada banyak peluang bisnis dan peluang startup yang muncul dari perubahan besar tersebut. Dan dalam dua tahun terakhir, kami telah melihat setiap tahun lebih dari satu miliar dolar diinvestasikan dalam hal aliran transaksi dan itu adalah 25x lipat dari periode 10 tahun tersebut.

Jadi saya pikir waktunya sangat tepat. Kami meremehkan dampaknya terhadap ekonomi dan ekosistem startup. Kami tidak lagi terlalu peduli dengan arus transaksi karena saat ini kami melihat lebih dari seribu perusahaan dalam setahun dan kami berinvestasi dalam setahun hingga saat ini, kami telah berinvestasi di 13 perusahaan, dan beberapa di antaranya adalah investasi lanjutan. Jadi proses seleksi kami masih cukup ketat. Jadi Anda bisa selektif dan Anda bisa melakukan investasi yang bagus dan berkualitas tinggi di Filipina sekarang. Dan saya pikir ini adalah salah satu alasan mengapa kami juga merilis hal-hal seperti laporan VC tahunan, mengapa kami menjadi bagian dari Sinigang Valley Association untuk mencoba mengedukasi, tidak hanya pemangku kepentingan Filipina, tetapi juga pemangku kepentingan regional dan global seperti, Hei, ada yang benar-benar berubah di Filipina. Dan Anda mungkin ingin melihat hal ini karena menurut kami ini adalah peluang investasi yang bagus.

(32:32) Jeremy Au:

Jadi, yang menarik adalah bahwa ada cerita tentang Asia. Dan kemudian ceritanya jelas tentang Asia di dalamnya. Dan ada cerita tentang Filipina. Itu salah satu cara untuk memikirkannya, bukan? Ini seperti, satu tingkat ke bawah, satu tingkat ke bawah. Tapi saya hanya ingin tahu, bagaimana Anda menggambarkan cerita tentang Filipina? Karena saya tahu Anda telah melakukan penggalangan dana dari piringan hitam, bahkan dukungan drama untuk ekosistem. Dan Anda telah melakukan banyak pekerjaan dalam kemitraan untuk menulis laporan ekosistem yang sebelumnya saya ulas di episode-episode sebelumnya untuk menjelaskan dan membicarakan ekosistem transit. Saya hanya ingin tahu, bagaimana Anda menggambarkan cerita itu? Baik hal positif maupun hal-hal yang masih perlu diperbaiki.

(33:02) Jelmer Ikink:

Sulit untuk diringkas, tetapi beberapa hal seperti pada dasarnya, dari perspektif makroekonomi, Filipina sebenarnya telah berjalan dengan sangat baik selama dua dekade terakhir. Rata-rata, pertumbuhan PDBnya sekitar lima hingga 7 persen dari tahun ke tahun. Kami hampir mencapai 6%, 5,9% pertumbuhan PDB dari tahun ke tahun, dan itu adalah yang tercepat di Asia Tenggara. Saya rasa salah satu yang tercepat di Asia setelah India. Dan itu bukanlah sesuatu yang baru, namun kurang dihargai, menurut saya. Jadi, sisi makroekonomi sebenarnya sudah jelas, namun kita memang perlu mengedukasi masyarakat tentang hal ini.

Saya pikir, yang kedua, hanya untuk berbagi sejumlah orang, sejumlah orang Filipina yang berada di Filipina, yang berpendidikan tinggi, paham teknologi dan digital, berbicara dalam bahasa Inggris, berbicara dengan banyak peluang investasi untuk MNC, tetapi juga perusahaan rintisan regional yang ingin berekspansi ke negara lain di Asia Tenggara. Dan satu hal lagi, populasi, seperti yang telah saya sebutkan, merupakan salah satu populasi termuda di dunia secara rata-rata. Jadi dalam beberapa dekade mendatang, kita memiliki demografi yang akan mengonsumsi lebih banyak per orang karena pendapatan rata-rata meningkat, tetapi juga populasi yang lebih besar karena jumlah penduduk masih terus bertambah. Dan itu adalah sesuatu yang tidak menjadi tren secara global. Maksud saya, ada beberapa negara di Asia, Jepang, Korea, dan Tiongkok, yang pada tingkat tertentu mengalami penurunan populasi yang signifikan. Dan saya pikir dividen demografis ini benar-benar dapat kita manfaatkan sebagai jumlah penduduk di Filipina, tetapi juga sebagai dana. Peluang investasi berlimpah. Dan jika Anda melihat cakrawala investasi tujuh tahun ke depan, Anda sudah mulai memanfaatkan dividen demografi tersebut.

Kemudian yang ketiga adalah para pemangku kepentingan. Jadi Anda memiliki pendiri dan investor. Saya pikir dalam hal pendiri, kita melihat apa yang disebut penyu, orang Filipina yang tinggal di luar negeri dan pindah ke Filipina, melihat peluang di sana dan mendirikan bisnis mereka sendiri. Semakin banyak orang Filipina yang lahir dan dibesarkan di Filipina yang berani untuk terjun ke dunia wirausaha. Dan itu karena mereka melihat teladan yang baik dalam perusahaan-perusahaan rintisan yang muncul selama dekade terakhir. Mereka melihat kurikulum di sekolah-sekolah semakin banyak yang memasukkan kelas kewirausahaan dan kursus pasar modal swasta. Hal ini sangat membantu mereka untuk sedikit lebih memahami apa yang dibutuhkan untuk menjadi seorang wirausahawan, bagaimana cara mendirikan startup, bagaimana cara menggalang dana, dan hal-hal semacam itu. Dan kami melihat kaliber dari para pengusaha tersebut, sebenarnya, bahkan kursus privat tersebut sangat membantu. Jadi hal ini sangat positif. Dan ruang peluang juga telah berkembang, mengingat apa yang baru saja saya sebutkan tentang titik balik selama pandemi. Begitu. Itu dari sudut pandang pendiri.

Kemudian investor, pihak-pihak seperti kami, kami melihat banyak, kami juga melihat banyak konglomerat, baik yang memulai atau mengembangkan bisnis VC korporat mereka sendiri, dan itu sangat membantu. Dan ada pemangku kepentingan ketiga yang baru saja dimulai, yaitu pemerintah. Pemerintah sekarang memiliki, selain program hibah biasa, mereka juga memiliki dana ventura startup, yang dikelola oleh NDC. Dan mereka juga menginvestasikan sekitar 200.000 dolar AS ke perusahaan rintisan. Dan mereka baru saja melakukan investasi pertama mereka. Jadi, hal ini juga memungkinkan pertumbuhan. Dan kami juga senang melihat dukungan semacam itu dari pemerintah. Itu saja dari perspektif pemangku kepentingan.

(36:13) Jelmer Ikink:

Kemudian yang terakhir, saya akan mengatakan bahwa sektor-sektor tersebut terus berkembang. Awalnya, kami melihat banyak pertumbuhan di fintech, e-commerce, hal-hal semacam itu, tetapi B2B benar-benar tumbuh sangat cepat di dalam fintech, tetapi juga di luar fintech, bisnis B2B, kami melihat peningkatan merek B2C lokal yang berkembang dengan baik, seperti Pickup Coffee atau Colourette. Orang Filipina, secara historis, biasanya membeli produk asing, tetapi saat ini mereka bangga membeli merek kopi lokal atau makeup lokal mereka sendiri, dan itu sangat luar biasa untuk dilihat. Dan kemudian sektor ketiga yang kami lihat berkembang adalah hal-hal yang berkaitan dengan keberlanjutan dan solusi inovatif lainnya yang sangat khas Filipina untuk masalah-masalah di Filipina. Dan saya pikir hal ini juga sangat menarik untuk dilihat, karena hal-hal yang tidak pernah kita pikirkan di luar negeri sekarang sedang dibangun di Filipina hanya untuk memperbaiki masalah yang ada di Filipina.

(37:04) Jeremy Au:

Apa saja masalah yang menurut Anda perlu diperbaiki di Filipina?

(37:07) Jelmer Ikink:

Maksud saya, seperti di negara mana pun, saya pikir ada banyak, tetapi ada banyak pertumbuhan secara umum melalui digitalisasi, tetapi tenaga kerja Filipina dulunya sangat murah dan masih relatif murah. Jadi jika Anda melihat situs B2B, secara historis, sangat mudah bagi perusahaan untuk, jika ada masalah, Anda akan mengerahkan lebih banyak tenaga kerja, Anda tahu, lebih banyak karyawan untuk memperbaiki masalah. Dan hal ini mengakibatkan produktivitas tenaga kerja Filipina relatif stabil. Tidak banyak meningkat selama bertahun-tahun. Jadi, apa yang kita lihat sekarang adalah, Anda tahu, adopsi digital platform SaaS B2B semakin terintegrasi ke dalam perusahaan-perusahaan ini. Jadi, tenaga kerja Filipina bisa menjadi lebih produktif. Mereka tidak perlu lagi melakukan tugas-tugas yang berulang-ulang dan dapat mulai melakukan pekerjaan yang lebih kompleks yang benar-benar memberikan nilai tambah bagi bisnis. Jadi, saya pikir ini adalah salah satu area di mana kita telah melihat satu masalah yang telah sedikit teratasi dari waktu ke waktu.

Dan saya pikir ada banyak pembicaraan tentang sektor BPO. Di Filipina, yang secara historis dan masih terus menjadi pendorong besar pertumbuhan PDB. Munculnya AI dan AI generatif dapat menjadi ancaman, tetapi Anda juga dapat melihatnya sebagai peluang karena apa yang kami lihat sebagai investor startup adalah bahwa, banyak lulusan jurusan ilmu komputer yang berbakat pergi untuk melakukan pekerjaan BPO yang relatif sederhana, padahal, menurut saya, keterampilan mereka kurang dimanfaatkan. Jadi, jika mereka dapat membuat pekerjaan mereka di perusahaan BPO lebih produktif dan lebih bernilai tambah dengan menghilangkan beberapa tugas berulang yang dapat dilakukan AI atau mereka pindah untuk membantu mengembangkan perusahaan startup atau mendirikan startup mereka sendiri. Saya pikir hal ini akan berdampak positif bagi perekonomian Filipina.

(38:48) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Anda tahu, sebelumnya Anda pernah bercerita bahwa VC merupakan kombinasi yang bagus dari keahlian perbankan investasi dan konsultasi. Dapatkah Anda berbagi lebih banyak tentang apa artinya itu?

(38:56) Jelmer Ikink:

Ya. Sebagai seorang konsultan, kritik di masa lalu, maksud saya, saya pikir mereka telah memperbaikinya, jadi saya tidak ingin, saya sudah lama tidak berkecimpung di bidang konsultasi, tetapi di masa lalu, kritiknya adalah Anda membuat laporan, Anda mempresentasikannya kepada dewan, atau manajemen c-suite, dan kemudian laporan tersebut berakhir di laci di suatu tempat yang berdebu. Apa yang Anda lakukan di VC adalah Anda masih membuat cetak biru strategi tersebut, Anda tahu, strategi pertumbuhan bersama dengan pendiri. Seperti, inilah yang kami yakini sebagai tesis investasi kami. Inilah cara kami berpikir bahwa kami dapat mengembangkan bisnis dengan produk atau wilayah baru, tetapi kemudian Anda bekerja sama dengan pendiri untuk menerapkannya dalam lima hingga tujuh tahun ke depan karena Anda adalah pemegang saham dan juga penerima manfaat ekonomi dari pertumbuhan tersebut.

Jadi, Anda benar-benar menaruh uang Anda di tempat yang tepat. Dan itulah salah satu bagian yang sangat saya nikmati. Saya mempelajarinya dalam konsultasi, namun kini Anda menerapkannya dengan cara yang menguntungkan bisnis dan pengembalian dana Anda. Jadi, itulah bagian konsultasi di mana hal itu berperan. Untuk perbankan, seperti yang saya sebutkan, Anda menjadi sangat nyaman dengan membaca dan menafsirkan angka-angka atau mencoba memahami apa masalah yang mendasarinya dan bagaimana Anda ingin meningkatkan berbagai hal dalam suatu organisasi. Jadi saya pikir itulah manfaat dari bagaimana perbankan investasi berperan. Fitur lainnya, saya berada di M&A pada saat itu adalah bahwa itu adalah jalan keluar yang umum untuk perusahaan portofolio kami. Jadi, jika Anda memahami sedikit tentang apa yang dicari oleh pembeli dalam transaksi M&A, maka hal ini akan membantu Anda dalam strategi exit Anda juga untuk ke depannya. Dan kewirausahaan, pada akhirnya, kami juga merupakan perusahaan rintisan. Kami adalah perusahaan rintisan yang baru berusia lima tahun. Foxmont adalah sebuah pengelola dana yang belum ada enam tahun yang lalu. Jadi kami juga sedang belajar melalui hal itu. Dan saya mencoba untuk memahami apa artinya menjadi seorang wirausahawan di sebuah perusahaan modal ventura.

(40:37) Jeremy Au:

Apa saja pembelajaran tersebut bagi Foxmont sebagai perusahaan modal ventura yang sedang belajar? Apa saja pelajaran yang telah Anda pelajari selama ini, selama enam tahun terakhir?

(40:43) Penanda

(40:43) Jelmer Ikink:

Saya rasa sangat menarik untuk melihat seberapa besar apa yang kami siapkan ternyata dibutuhkan atau diminta oleh para pengusaha. Sungguh memuaskan melihat bagaimana beberapa minggu yang lalu kami mengadakan pertemuan Foxmont, yang merupakan acara tahunan yang kami adakan dengan para pendiri yang kami investasikan dan mereka berkumpul. Kami mengundang para ahli di bidang-bidang tertentu. Bisa jadi pelatih motivasi, bisa jadi atlet profesional, bisa jadi keuangan, atau HR. Pokoknya para ahli di semua jenis bidang dan mencoba memberikan keahlian mereka kepada para pendiri kami. Itu adalah salah satu bagian dari hari itu. Bagian lain dari hari itu adalah kami benar-benar mencoba membuat para pendiri kami berbaur satu sama lain dan menemukan sinergi di dalam komunitas Foxmont dan melihat setiap tahun, bagaimana hal itu menumbuhkan ekosistem, yang kami sebut Foxmont Mafia, sungguh sangat menarik untuk dilihat. Dan saya pikir salah satu pembelajarannya adalah saya tidak pernah menyangka bahwa hal ini akan berkembang pesat dalam waktu yang singkat. Dan ini merupakan bukti bagi para pendiri kami karena, pada akhirnya, kami berinvestasi pada mereka. Kami membantu mereka, dan mendukung mereka semampu kami. Namun, pendiri adalah orang yang memiliki ide dan orang yang benar-benar menjalankannya bersama tim mereka. Jadi bagi saya, satu pembelajaran adalah bahwa semangat dan kualitas kewirausahaan ada di Filipina. Ini hanya perlu diaktifkan oleh para pemangku kepentingan seperti kami dan perusahaan modal ventura lainnya di wilayah dan negara ini.

(41:59) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Bisakah Anda berbagi tentang saat-saat Anda secara pribadi menjadi berani?

(42:02) Jelmer Ikink:

Saya pikir ada beberapa lapisan keberanian, tetapi merupakan keputusan yang sulit bagi saya untuk membuat lompatan dari karier yang relatif pasti di McKinsey untuk kemudian pergi ke Tiongkok dan tidak tahu apa yang akan terjadi. Dan kemudian pindah ke Filipina dan tidak tahu apa yang akan terjadi, bukan? Itu adalah lompatan keyakinan yang perlu Anda lakukan antara jalur karier tertentu dan rollercoaster yang tidak menentu. Dan hal tersebut memang merupakan rollercoaster, namun saya tidak akan pernah menukarnya. Jadi, mengambil lompatan keyakinan dan tidak mengambil jalan yang paling sedikit resistensi, hanya membantu Anda tumbuh dengan cepat sebagai manusia.

(42:34) Jeremy Au:

Menakjubkan. Bisakah Anda ceritakan bagaimana Anda membuat keputusan tersebut?

(42:37) Jelmer Ikink:

Saya berbicara dengan banyak orang. Saya melakukan banyak pemikiran pribadi. Saya memproyeksikan diri saya 10 tahun ke depan dan berpikir, Oke, dalam 10 tahun dari sekarang, di mana saya akan berada? Dan cerita apa yang ingin saya miliki dalam ransel kecil pengalaman hidup saya? Dan bagi saya, hal itu menghasilkan keputusan untuk mengambil keputusan yang tidak diketahui.

(42:57) Jeremy Au:

Saya kira sudah hampir 10 tahun sejak saat itu?

(43:00) Jelmer Ikink:

Sudah 15 tahun. Ya. Ya, sudah lebih dari 10 tahun sejak pindah ke Filipina, tapi sudah 15 tahun sejak di Tiongkok.

(43:08) Jeremy Au:

Menurut Anda, bagaimana perbandingannya dengan proyeksi awal Anda?

(43:10) Jelmer Ikink:

Beberapa bagian lebih baik, beberapa bagian lebih buruk, saya akan mengatakan secara umum karena itu adalah hal yang tidak diketahui, saya benar-benar memiliki harapan yang kecil dan itu membuat saya jauh lebih sadar juga. Hanya mengalami, dan memahami apa yang sedang terjadi saat ini dibandingkan dengan selalu mengejar karier perusahaan, mengetahui di mana saya ingin berada dalam empat tahun ke depan. Hal ini membuat Anda mengejar target tersebut, berbeda dengan apa yang saya lakukan sekarang, apa yang telah saya lakukan sebagai seorang pengusaha. Seperti yang saya katakan, ini adalah roller coaster. Anda tidak tahu apa yang akan terjadi di depan mata. Jadi ini cukup menarik. Tetap menarik.

(43:39) Jeremy Au:

Ketika Anda memikirkan hal itu, saya sangat penasaran ketika Anda memproyeksikan diri Anda 10 tahun dari sekarang. Apakah Anda sudah memikirkannya? Menurut Anda, aspek apa saja yang akan ada di sana?

(43:46) Jelmer Ikink:

Ya. Kami menganggapnya sebagai Foxmont. Saya memikirkannya secara pribadi. Saya memikirkannya secara pribadi, seperti hubungan pribadi dengan istri saya. Saya pikir terus memiliki pola pikir yang terbuka, rasa ingin tahu itu, berjalan-jalan dengan tangan di belakang. Saya ingin menjaga rasa ingin tahu itu dengan Foxmont secara khusus. Saya ingin terus berkembang. Kami berpikir bahwa jumlah dana yang kami miliki saat ini dan yang ingin kami miliki di tahun-tahun mendatang. Ini masih sangat kecil untuk potensi yang ada di Filipina. Sekarang, kami tidak ingin menjadi satu-satunya pihak. Kami pikir harus ada keseimbangan yang baik antara para pemain di dalam ekosistem. Namun kami ingin menjadi pihak utama yang memiliki reputasi dalam membantu para pendiri mengembangkan bisnis mereka dan juga bagi para investor regional untuk melihat kami sebagai jembatan ke Filipina, pihak yang memahami Filipina. Dan saya pikir ada begitu banyak area di mana kami, sebagai manajer investasi, dapat berkembang di Filipina. Ekosistemnya semakin matang. Jadi seiring berjalannya waktu, Anda dapat secara perlahan menuju pertumbuhan yang lebih besar. Ada kelas aset lain yang berpotensi untuk Anda investasikan dari waktu ke waktu pada instrumen lain. Jadi, ya, ada banyak ide. Namun pada akhirnya, kita tidak tahu apa yang akan terjadi di masa depan. Dan saat ini kami hanya fokus untuk mendapatkan imbal hasil yang baik untuk dana kami saat ini.

(44:53) Jeremy Au:

Anda menyebutkan bahwa rasa ingin tahu masih sangat penting bagi Anda. Dapatkah Anda berbagi tentang bagaimana Anda masih melihat atau memelihara rasa ingin tahu Anda saat ini?

(45:00) Jelmer Ikink:

Setiap kali saya mendengar pernyataan yang kuat, saya hampir secara visual mencoba memikirkan kebalikannya dan melihat apakah saya juga mempercayai perspektif itu. Hal ini relatif mudah bagi seorang investor yang terkadang membuat jari-jari Anda terbakar. Kadang-kadang Anda membuat taruhan yang sangat bagus. Pada akhirnya, ada banyak komponen dan bahkan ada faktor keberuntungan yang terlibat dalam apakah sebuah investasi itu bagus atau berakhir bagus atau tidak. Dan saya pikir dengan tetap berpikiran terbuka, seperti mungkin itu tidak berhasil di waktu yang lalu, tapi bukan berarti Anda tidak boleh berinvestasi pada produk atau bisnis yang sama saat ini. Menurut saya, menjaga keterbukaan pikiran itu sangat penting bagi seorang manajer investasi.

(45:35) Jeremy Au:

Untuk itu, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi perjalanan Anda, Jelmer. Saya ingin merangkum tiga hal penting yang saya dapatkan dari percakapan ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang gambaran masa kecil Anda saat Anda berjalan-jalan dengan tangan di belakang punggung, ingin tahu tentang taman bermain, sungguh luar biasa mendengar keingintahuan dan semangat belajar yang terbawa hingga ke jurusan Anda, menjadi seorang bankir investasi hingga menjadi konsultan dan melakukan sebuah kalimat besar, yaitu karier Anda. Sangat menarik untuk mendengar serangkaian trade-off tersebut, tetapi juga beberapa keputusan dan bagaimana Anda mengambil keputusan tersebut.

Kedua, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang Foxmont dan visinya, tentang dunia kopi dan teman-temannya, serta bagaimana nama itu muncul. Sangat menarik untuk mendengar tentang visi Anda untuk Filipina dan beberapa masalah yang perlu ditangani saat ini, tetapi juga solusi yang Anda lihat mulai bermunculan dan jenis pendiri yang mulai Anda lihat di ekosistem lokal.

Terakhir, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi kisah pribadi Anda tentang keberanian. Saya sangat menikmati saat-saat mendengar bagaimana pindah ke Asia merupakan lompatan besar bagi Anda, tetapi itu adalah sesuatu yang Anda kerjakan dan temukan cara melakukannya, dan benar-benar menjaga semangat untuk terus belajar. Jadi, terima kasih banyak, Jelmer.

(46:34) Jelmer Ikink:

Terima kasih. Sangat menyenangkan berada di podcast.