Carlo Chen-Delantar: Iron Triangle in Emerging Markets, Philippines Gobi VC & Alibaba Report & Career Journey from Social Impact to VC - E369

· VC and Angels,Philippines,Podcast Episodes

“I didn’t come from a finance background, but I got the respect of the ecosystem because I kept listening. I made sure that I had my space, that my integrity was in check, and that I provided value. It's okay not to have all the answers. It takes a lot of bravery to be humble and vulnerable in the space. With that, you invite the right communities. We wouldn't be introduced if it weren't for the community. You need to meet the right enablers. Being brave also means that when there isn't a path right in front of you, you need to pave it. If your gut instinct tells you there’s something there, great. If not, you turn around and find another spot. It's a compass that you need to fix. Sometimes, you need to clunk that compass so it’ll redirect to another direction.” - Carlo Chen-Delantar

“The Iron Triangle was coined by Jack Ma from Alibaba. It’s a very simple, straightforward way to measure how the digital ecosystem can be robust and also strengthened. The Iron Triangle consists of three pillars: fintech, e-commerce, and logistics. Once you have these solidified, it starts expanding. The more it expands, the more industries come to join in. In the Philippines, we've been fortunate that FinTech is very progressive through the support of the central bank and the alliance of FinTech services here. During the pandemic, over 10,000 SMEs onboarded to the e-commerce platforms became instant Philippine millionaires. Logistics is probably where I'm advocating to have more investments coming in, mainly because it attracts more B2C entrepreneurs. You see more flow of goods and efficiency of better last-mile logistics and so forth.” - Carlo Chen-Delantar

“We're seeing some remnants of representation from the private sector saying we need to protect the startups. You shouldn't try to make it harder for startups because we want them to grow. To do that, you need private sector representatives explaining how startups work. They're completely different from what others know. We don't need offices, we need to be a bit more flexible. Things are changing. The question of how fast is the most important. So the acceleration of the changes and defining startups in the Philippines are what the National Innovation Council is doing.” - Carlo Chen-Delantar

Carlo Chen-Delantar, Founding Partner of Gobi-Core Philippine Fund & Head of ESG at Gobi Partners, and Jeremy Au talked about three main themes:

1. Career Journey from Social Impact to VC: Carlo shared his journey from a family of entrepreneurs in the Philippines to his work in the nonprofit sector, focusing on social impact and clean water access. His transition to venture capital was unplanned, influenced by the realization of the potential impact through technology and capital allocation.

2. Gobi & Alibaba Philippines Startup Report: Carlo discussed the burgeoning startup landscape, the importance of understanding the local ecosystem, the role of technology in economic and social progress, and the challenges and opportunities for startups. He emphasized the structural and policy need to improve the ease of doing business and the attraction, retention and training of talent across the country.

3. Emerging Markets Iron Triangle: Carlo explained the concept of the "Iron Triangle" in emerging markets (fintech, e-commerce & logistics). He shared specific FinTech opportunities, emphasized the significance of national ID systems and growth opportunities (in sectors like health tech and gaming) fueled by the young and digitally savvy.

Jeremy and Carlo also discussed the challenges of doing business, the cost of brain drain, government policies affecting startups, and the importance of inclusive development across different regions of the Philippines.

Supported by

Hive Health

Are you expanding or launching a business in the Philippines? Ensuring your employees' good health is key to attracting and retaining top talent. That's where Hive Health comes in, especially for startups and small to medium-sized businesses. They specialize in providing top-quality and hassle-free healthcare plans tailored to your workplace. Learn more at www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:50) Jeremy Au:

Hey Carlo, really excited to have you at the show. We had such a wonderful time discussing the Philippines and Southeast Asia and felt like this would be a great conversation to have. Could you introduce yourself real quick?

(01:59) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Hi Jeremy, thanks for having me. Carlo Chan Dalantar. I am the Founding Partner for the Gobi Corp Philippine Fund, and regionally I am the head of ESG and circular economy for Gobi Partners.

(02:09) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. So tell me more about yourself. What was your earlier career like?

(02:13) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Yeah, so I come from a family of manufacturers. My family comes from Cebu, Philippines, born and bred there. My parents really came from nothing and they were, themselves entrepreneurs. So with the exporting industry, this is like the heyday, the golden age of exporting in the Philippines was from the '90s to the early 2000s. Basically, I learned all our weekends were at the factory and that's how I sort of honed my entrepreneurial skills. And because of that, learning exporting and the supply chain, I really started becoming an entrepreneur, and my parents just told me, if you want a toy, you have to work for it. So I started selling sneakers and hip-hop shirts in high school and made about 500 per week and I was balling at that time. That's how my journey started.

And when I went to California for college, I got really enthralled with Tom's shoes. This was during the time of the social entrepreneur era in the US. Learned a lot about that, wanted to help, came back to the Philippines, and built a couple of businesses, including our family's eco-fashion line really brought me into impact. And, you know, things sort of just started there. And over time, I think the most crucial part that really changed the trajectory of my career and my life was really typhoon Yolanda. This is 2013 and it really affected millions of Filipinos in this space. And we were also part of that, but we were very lucky that we recovered easily and waves for water came into my life. So I was running a nonprofit for about seven years, still running. Now we've hit 10 years. We've helped over 2 million Filipinos with clean water access. And that really showed me that technology and impact and proper flow of funding with the right team, with the right technology, with the right platform, it really creates, becomes an innovation, but also an impact to help out, right? And that's been, if we're talking about my bleeding heart, it's always been social impact in that sense. And now, I've been brought into the VC space. So some people say I've turned on the other side, but I see it as a way to, especially in the Philippines. It's a good way to create impact at this rate when everything's still so direct with the use of capital allocation.

(04:17) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. And how did you transition into venture capital?

(04:20) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

So funny story, it was never planned. I came back from a conference in Switzerland in 2017 and I thought to myself, wow, the world is so different nowadays. It's globalizing. And I saw that the non profit space had it's ceiling and I knew that if done properly, it could be a place for more leaders to develop.

So I was thinking about what the next step could be for me and talk to my partners now, Jason and Ken, and we said, Hey, you know, we're still young. We have networks, we have the stamina. Let's create the next Jollibee. So that was the joke, and all of a sudden, Jason, our Managing Partner, said, Oh, my boss from New York said we need to meet this this guy from Malaysia. He was my former roommate. So, that was Tom, and Tom messaged Jason and said, Hey, come to Malaysia for the weekend, and we'll show you around. And a lot of 12, 15 startups around the region came, met us. We didn't know that they were pitching to us. They wanted to know about the Philippines and we were just blown away. And then this was late 2017 and we were blown away. Nothing was happening in the Philippines, so to speak.

(05:21) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, amazing. So why has it been like, and at least for the past few years, you've been working in the Philippines and the venture capital ecosystem. What has that personally been like?

(05:28) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

I would say 2017, as a wallflower in this space, even during the nonprofit side, I saw that sooner or later, the best way to see progress economically, social-wise too, would be the use of technology, reducing the cost, making everyone productive, efficient, and I saw that with the non profit side, but when I was going towards looking, being part of VC, first thing we said was, was there an opportunity to begin with? I still remember during that time G-cash and Maya, they were struggling to get everyone on board. And so this was the nascent era, this 2017 and 2019, I would say we're the gen zero or the gen one of the Philippine startup founders. Now you don't see them anymore. They're all thriving.

They're trying to figure out more stuff. It's gotten bigger. It's been great. It was a bit harder during that time the pandemic was really the game changer because everyone was sort of really brute force into using technology as as the essentials.

(06:24) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. So what's interesting is that, you've recently come out of the report on the Philippines ecosystem. Could you share a little bit more about why you wanted to write this report?

(06:32) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Sure. So when we announced our first fund, this was 2018, we started deploying 2020. We got a lot of pitch decks coming in and over now, over a thousand, we realized the amount of data that we have, we couldn't keep it. We don't want, we didn't want to. So we started thinking about what if we can give back to the community and use this as a platform to get more investments and more players coming to the field. So our first Philippine startup ecosystem report was launched 2021. And I still remember talking about it during Philippine startup week that, if you're looking for a sign, this is it. We saw that, the past four years before combined was lower than just 2021 alone in terms of funding.

(07:14) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

So that really started the conversation of we should do this annually, but a yearly report didn't make sense because the changes would be not as drastic. And so we do it every other year. And this year we saw that there are more reports coming out to the Philippines. And I think there needs to be more, but we realized outside of Metro Manila, there wasn't really a blueprint of how to be a funded startup founder in the Philippines. So we said, we have a couple of Series B, Series C founders. What if they pay it forward? And that's what we did. We call it the Founders Edition. It's made by founders for founders. Partly, we wanted to give an update on the tech ecosystem with proper methodologies. But also, really helping countryside development, having founders not just come from Metro Manila or internationally, but giving the same fighting chance or equal opportunity for founders, whether you're in Mindanao or Visayas, you could be a farmer, you could be a fisherman, you could be someone that's completely uneducated. We wanted to level the playing field and that's exactly what it is. And so far it's been doing good.

(08:15) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. So could you share a little bit more about what were your key findings from the report?

(08:19) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

There's a lot to talk about that, but I think the crucial parts here is, what are the traits, skills that investors are looking for when it comes to the founders. We also have areas as easy as which areas in terms of business models they're looking into, where you graduate demographics, all the way to different trends in this space. But if there's specific things you want me to talk about. It's a 50-page report, but I could distill it for you.

(08:45) Jeremy Au:

I like the opening statement that you had about the iron triangle. So we talked about how FinTech, e-commerce, and logistics are like the starter uh, fundamental construction layer for emerging markets. And so, that's something that as a thesis, could you share a little bit more about how that came about?

(09:00) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Sure. So the Iron Triangle was coined by Jack Ma from Alibaba. And it was a very simple, straightforward way to measure how the digital ecosystem can be robust, but also strengthened. So, the Iron Triangle consists of three pillars. You have Fintech, E-commerce, and Logistics. And once you have these solidified, it starts expanding. The more it expands, the more industries come to join in. So e-commerce is the flow, the selling digitally for goods and services, fintech is a way to exchange of value. And of course, logistics, especially when you're looking at physical goods. In the Philippines, we've been fortunate enough that fintech is very progressive through the support of the central bank and the alliance of finTech services here. It's been great. Remittances alone, globally coming back to the Philippines. It's one of the largest ways for the economy to operate.

(09:52) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

E-commerce, the cultural phenomenon of we love our jingles and songs. It's really gotten like this whole add to cart situation. E-commerce is really a good way. Fun fact, during the pandemic, over 10,000 SMEs that got onboarded to the e commerce platforms became instant Philippine millionaires. So I think those two are strong, and they've been really leading majority of the funding in the Philippines. However, logistics is probably where I'm advocating to have more investments coming in, mainly because it attracts more B2C entrepreneurs. You see more flow of goods and efficiency of better last-mile logistics and so forth. The Philippines is, of course, archipelagic. We have almost 8,000 islands in this space, 7,00, and when you look at the space, a lot of products come from Metro Manila or from China. Let's say you're sending something to Cebu or from Cebu to Davao. It has to go to Manila, then come back to Davao, so the islands aren't actually talking to each other and decentralization, and efficiency of logistics could make or break the changes and possibly a couple unicorns coming out of second or third tier cities.

(10:57) Jeremy Au:

So I think what's interesting is that there's a lot of underlying macro growth, right? So, previously talked about on a podcast episodes about the young age of Filipinos overall in ASEAN as population, the fast growth of digital consumers coming online. The increased adoption of digitalization. So it seems like it's all good news, right? What do you think are some of the harder aspects, maybe at a macro level before you zoom into the different verticals, but are there any kind of things that you should be thinking about on a macro side?

(11:25) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Yeah, second largest population in ASEAN, and that's great, progressive central bank, fintech side, e-commerce, good. We're seeing more founders. What tends to be forgotten to talk about is the ease of doing business in the Philippines. It's harder to do business in the Philippines based on statistics compared to doing business in Cambodia. So we're not ASEAN six, we're actually ASEAN seven for that sense. And that changes the game. Even on our startup level, when we invest, we see it's better outside of, once you dominate Metro Manila or key cities like Cebu, Davao, you have to go out mainly because it's cheaper to start a new location and maybe in Ho Chi Minh compared to doing smaller cities. The way the Philippines is sort of also designed is we have an administration, presidential administration of six years. Then you have the congressional, senatorial levels could be four or three. Then you have the local ones. So just thinking about all these permits in between is not fun. However, technology makes it so that your asset life, you can wiggle your way around.

But it's also that, right? Things are becoming regulated. Do you find your fit here? Logistics plays a big role, especially when you're selling stuff. But outside of that, I would even say talent. Of course, this is like a global issue, but even so in the Philippines, there's a thing called brain drain. A lot of Filipinos would rather be paid in dollars than the Philippine pesos. And we know that there's a global Filipino talent but in terms of being competitive, we are not as competitive compared to the large study abroad in Vietnam. So there are multiple aspects of it that we need to learn from our ASEAN six or ASEAN neighbors. And I think the silver lining here is the Philippines is definitely last among the ASEAN six, but we can learn from all the years of development around. So whether that's Indonesia, all the way to Vietnam, Thailand, and there's a lot of insights here of like my thoughts of where the Philippines or what the Philippine ecosystem could become in that sense. So, but I would say those two are very important.

(13:24) Jeremy Au:

I think what's interesting is that you've mentioned about the ease of doing business is something that's to be improved on. Are there any examples of what does it mean for it to be hard to do business?

(13:33) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Yes. So there is a Innovative Startup Act that was authored by Senator Bam Aquino. This was approved 2019 0, and basically it had three things going for it. Startup Visa, Tax Holidays for Startups, and the Startup Venture Fund, which is the only one running, but they're still starting to deploy. Finally, they deployed this year. So I think the Startup Venture Fund, what's crucial here is they will, if you apply to be a co-investment partner, and we invite all investors in the region to come in, they will match it. But this is like early stage. Then they also are hoping to deploy their Fund of Funds program. So that's a crucial part of the Startup Venture Fund.

The other two aspects is probably the hardest to do. Right now, blanketed. Any foreigners that want to work in the Philippines. It's just one under work visa. There should be and this law was actually modeled off Malaysia and Singapore's Startup Visa laws, right? So, fast tracking work visas would be the best way to do it. That would be the second thing. And then lastly, our tax holidays for startups. Of course the, we call it BIR, Bureau of Internal Revenue, or the tax ministry. They don't want their revenues going down because of holidays. But as we all know, tax holidays motivate people to invest in, in an economy. And I think when that kicks in, then it's a bit easier, but as you know, there, there are ways around it. But once, once you have that, I think, it really completes this whole robust tech ecosystem.

The government is putting in a lot of effort now. They've deployed and funded over $11.4 million since 2019, and things are moving. And the key thing about the government in the Philippines is Filipinos are very critical and vocal about how money is deployed. And rightfully so. So I think what's crucial now is providing that awareness that the government can't go 0 to 100. It's 0 to 10, 10 to 30. 30 to 50, and so on and so forth. So it'll take a while. But with this presidential administration, it's their second year. Now we have about four or five years to really turn the tides and I'm very bullish about it.

(15:34) Jeremy Au:

Any other government policies or changes that you think are really important for founders or folks who are building out the Filipino ecosystem to be aware of.

(15:42) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Interestingly enough, when we did the survey, a lot of the founders don't rely on the government. I think that's a great mindset. If you're a private sector, you have to be creative and be resilient, resourceful, even in this space, but the government really dictates how the ecosystem could go from from 1 to 100. So, the most interesting thing that came out this year was actually NEDA, which handles most of the infrastructure and economic planning for the Philippines. They just launched a National Innovation Council. And basically the goal is to have all the secretaries of all government agencies and private sector.

(16:18) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

So we're seeing some remnants of representation from the private sector saying we need to protect the startups. You shouldn't try to make it harder for startups because we want them to grow. And in order to do that, you need private sector representatives saying that this is how these startups work. They're completely different from what you know. We don't need offices. We need to be a bit more flexible. All these things really come up. And to give you an idea, some offices still use typewriters, in government offices. So it's backwards, but you need representation and awareness that these things could happen. So things are changing. The question of how fast is probably the most important. So the acceleration of the changes is something that the National Innovation Council is doing and also defining startups in the Philippines. When you say startups in the Philippines, it's not defined as technology startups, but rather a business, whether you're a starting business or an SME with an innovative model. And innovative here is very widely loose. It could be saying that you're selling something like sachets, but you're really not selling sachets, or you're doing something technology enabled. So it's very fluid in that sense.

(17:21) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. The other thing you mentioned obviously is the state of talent and landscape in the Philippines. Could you share more about that?

(17:28) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

State of talent. Well, put it this way, the good parts are if you are in STEM or in IT, junior, middle, and senior hires from any industry. Your salary would be 30 to 40% more than any other industries. That's a fact. Now, in terms of education, going to support more onboarded to that, that's definitely lacking. And the proliferation of boot camps in the Philippines is becoming way more eminent now. And a lot of conglomerates now realize that they need to upscale their employees in order to be competitive.

(18:01) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

So in terms of Filipinos, and this is where this whole juxtaposition of where the Philippines could be as an ecosystem. The Philippines, there's a possibility of it becoming a CBC land, like Thailand, or it could be an Indonesia where there's a lot of startups competing for the same business model, or a mix of both. We could have a Vietnam, but state of talent means that we need to motivate and attract global Filipinos to come back and build startups, but also figuring out where do you find these CTOs? I have some wild ideas, like, in order to motivate and attract talent, you need to create dev houses in Boracay or Siargao or in the beaches. It's cheaper rent. You can create a bootcamp. Internet's fast now with Starlink. It's a good way to make costs on their take home pay better. I think that's a good way to do it. But also just forward in this space where we don't see too much. I guess it's also busy, right? The multiplier effect hasn't kicked in, but once we do have a couple of unicorns, the narrative changes. Okay, a startup founder could be really successful just being in tech.

So, we're seeing that as a very important part, the Zeitgeist have changed before, interns or fresh graduates from top universities would go straight to accounting firms. Now they just want to go straight to So it's getting there, I would say. But tech talent in itself and main reason why deals in the Philippines have gotten a bit expensive the past two years was the import of talent to build the tech. We're also seeing a trend, funny enough, that a lot of Filipino founders would have either an Indian CTO or an Indian workforce that's building in it. And I think that could also be a sign of the shortage of talent in the Philippines, but it could also mean it could leapfrog everything else in between.

(19:41) Jeremy Au:

Could you share a little bit more about what you mean by import of talent?

(19:43) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Yes. A few startups here, especially in the growth stage side some of their Head of Product, Head of Engineers, Product Managers, they either come from Indonesia, India, Singapore, or even as far as Europe, building the tech and you have junior engineers could be in the Philippines or not, they outsource it, right? So we're seeing a lot of that. I know a couple of startups hire, import of talent to attract Filipino engineers to come in. It's also the quality, right? Time is money, the quality of talent, or at least the product they create isn't just yet as global quality. And I don't want of course, overgeneralize, but there are some interesting ones that are really building it out.

I'd love you for to invite Jake from Expedock. He has a great story on how he's finding diamonds in the rough in the Philippines and his model on cadetship and even Ragdiff from ChatGenie. That's something we're building out even as a VC is how can we create this whole pipeline of engineers and talent for this space.

(20:40) Jeremy Au:

And kind of double clicking into some of the verticals here, we talked about the fintech side, the logistics, but also the gaming side has, you know, rising sectors and health tech as well. What jumps out at you as something that you're personally interested or curious about out of all the verticals you mentioned in the report?

(20:56) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

We have data, but also data and insights. They give you, they paint a picture, but we also have our biases. I look at before we would finish this report, the first thing I said. Okay, something's not right on my end, I thought for a long time, B2C business models and startups were the dominant models in the Philippines. I was wrong. It was actually B2B. And it makes sense now. For B2C to work, again, going back to the Iron Triangle, the logistics side needs to be supported so that more B2C startups come out here. It's hard to compete with Lazada and Shopee in the space already. And even Lazada and Shopee arguably have one of the largest fleets for logistics already in the Philippines. So it creates, starting to become a duopoly, but we want more players to come in this space. Good example, just recently InDrive is coming in, they just got the nod to start their ride hailing app in the Philippines and they will start being a competitor of Grab. So I think that's crucial part.

In terms of where business models could come in, I think the wave of new FinTech models are going to come out, especially now that. You have the inherent foundational platforms like Gcash and Maya, they're sort of creating a super app, but I think there will be some new entrants of models that could use the base layer of these e wallet platforms to do so. And I'm also very surprised that although they're being ran by banks and telcos that, they still want e wallets, you know, in Thailand, they don't want e wallets because it's another 3 5 percent surcharge. But it's interesting that e wallets are really taking the stage in consumption here in the Philippines.

We're bullish on gaming and media and entertainment mainly because the global Filipino audience and the Filipino culture hasn't been exponentially tapped. You have K pop, you have Japanese culture, but Filipino culture, stereotype of Filipinos are either you sing or dance, but you know, how can we make that as a way to increase the cultural phenomenon and adoption.

We're seeing also a lot of health and education, which is. Rightly so is fundamental for the Philippines. So I'd start there and then there, there are more changes happening over time. Blockchain is very hot in the Philippines. Exchanges are getting a lot of regulatory oversight at the moment, but there's so many aspects. I think forex exchange and arbitrage in the blockchain is still missing. Web3 is still struggling, but really trying to maintain its relevance in the Philippines. So I think there's that, but I also want to make a disclosure there. A lot of these founders are either regional or coming from Metro Manila, Visayas, and Mindanao. We're not seeing the same level of funded startups, and we want to change that as well. And that's the reason why we created a report. I think the most important thing of a lot of the founders is really the funding landscape. We even added Monk's Hill there and showing that where do you get funding? It's a cheat sheet, right? If you're getting funds from seed all the way to growth, local, international, you have that as a way to fast track your fundraising.

(23:49) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, I thought one interesting statistic that came up for me was that only 46% of the Philippines is banked versus Indonesia, 51%. Vietnam is 60%. Malaysia, 88%, thailand, 94%, and Singapore 97%. So I thought that was quite a interesting statistic. I think, I mean, I've known about it from a qualitative sense, but it was great to see that chart come out. I mean, I felt like that was the biggest one of the biggest gaps, I would say biggest differences, I would say. Any thoughts about that?

(24:15) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Yeah. I think that's the reason why fintech's really still as strong as it should be. Things have changed. They say, 10% of that would be 10 percent of the total bank population would have credit cards. The rest are still using debit cards. And some of them are just skipping all that and just having e-wallets. I think the crucial part of the growth would be the national ID system. Now it's easier because let's say you wanted to apply for a passport. There are like 15 types of government issued IDs you need to use. But when you have a national ID system, you show that they're good. So the Landbank, which is like government's development back in the Philippines, when the national ID system came in, they've onboarded close to 10 million new bank accounts, right? The real question is, active bank users is the crucial part and onboarding them to using the digital products is going to be the next step. And as you know, it's never zero to 100. Maybe you can go from zero to 50%. The next 20 or 5 percent is really expensive. It's hard to close the gap, but I think that's really exciting.

But before even that due to work, we need proper internet connectivity across the chain. I love to say that Thailand has one of the best connectivity. So you can go to a cave, you'd still have 5G. In the Philippines, you just go out of the city, you start getting spotty. So it's these things that really add up. But yeah, you'll see a lot of the adoption once sari-sari stores or we call them like warungs in Indonesia. It's a good way to get adoption on specific demographics. But the Gen Zs and millennials are probably the first. They're really taking up majority of adoption in that space.

(25:44) Jeremy Au:

On that note, could you share about a time that you personally have been brave?

(25:47) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

I the being brave is, you know, taking the leap from more impact nonprofit to the finance space. I don't come from a finance background, but I've paid my dues got the respect of the ecosystem because I kept listening. I just made sure that I had my space. Integrity was in check. And I provided value. My partners provide the finance point of view. I've learned a lot of it now. And really it's just being honest who you're talking to, right? Communicating. It's okay not to have all the answers. And it takes a lot of bravery to be humble and vulnerable in that space. And with that, you invite the right communities. I mean, talking to you, we wouldn't be introduced if it weren't for the community that told me that I was in Singapore. You need to meet the right enablers like you. And we talked about how you got in Forbes. I think that was also hilarious, right? So just all these things and being brave also means sometimes there isn't a path right in front of you and you need to pave it. If you have a gut instinct and there's something there, great. If not, you turn around, find another spot. So I think that's it. It's both the moral and it's it's a compass that you need to fix. Sometimes you just need to clunk that compass and it'll redirect stuff.

(26:56) Jeremy Au:

Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing. I'd love to summarize the three big takeaways I got from this conversation. First of all, thank you so much for sharing about your own personal journey. It was great to hear about how you came from a family of entrepreneurs and was very focused on giving back and community work. And how you eventually transition into venture capital as a way to help build up the Philippines' startup ecosystem in the future for the population as well.

Secondly, thanks so much for sharing about how you came about to write the Gobi report on the Philippines. And I found it was very interesting to talk about the macros not just the opportunities, but also some of the challenges. And I thought it was very enlightening to talk about how the ease of doing business is something that's a very key priority and important step for the Philippines to advance on to help make it easier for other startups to emerge, as well as the, talent market in terms of being able to import and retain talent that's able to help build out these companies to the next stage of development.

Lastly, thanks so much for sharing about some specific verticals. You talk about FinTech, for example, is where there's opportunity for all of the rails to be built and how the digital ID is a big component and prerequisite for it to be successful. I thought it was also interesting for you to share your points of view about Iron Triangle between fintech, logistics, and e-commerce as well, and how you see that continuing to advance in the Philippines.

On that note, thank you so much, Carlo, for sharing your point of view.

(28:18) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Thanks, Jeremy. Really enjoyed this talk.

Related link:

"Saya tidak berasal dari latar belakang keuangan, namun saya mendapatkan rasa hormat dari ekosistem karena saya terus mendengarkan. Saya memastikan bahwa saya memiliki ruang sendiri, integritas saya terjaga, dan saya memberikan nilai. Tidak masalah untuk tidak memiliki semua jawaban. Dibutuhkan banyak keberanian untuk menjadi rendah hati dan rentan dalam ruang tersebut. Dengan itu, Anda mengundang komunitas yang tepat. Kami tidak akan diperkenalkan jika bukan karena komunitas. Anda harus bertemu dengan orang-orang yang tepat. Menjadi berani juga berarti bahwa ketika tidak ada jalan yang tepat di depan Anda, Anda harus merintisnya. Jika naluri Anda mengatakan bahwa ada sesuatu di sana, bagus. Jika tidak, Anda harus berbalik dan mencari tempat lain. Ini adalah kompas yang perlu Anda perbaiki. Terkadang, Anda perlu membenturkan kompas itu agar kompas tersebut mengarahkan ke arah lain." - Carlo Chen-Delantar

 

"Segitiga Besi diciptakan oleh Jack Ma dari Alibaba. Ini adalah cara yang sangat sederhana dan mudah untuk mengukur bagaimana ekosistem digital dapat menjadi kuat dan juga diperkuat. Segitiga Besi terdiri dari tiga pilar: fintech, e-commerce, dan logistik. Setelah Anda memperkuat ketiga pilar ini, maka ekosistem akan mulai berkembang. Semakin berkembang, semakin banyak industri yang bergabung. Di Filipina, kami beruntung karena fintech sangat progresif melalui dukungan bank sentral dan aliansi layanan fintech di sini. Selama pandemi, lebih dari 10.000 UKM yang bergabung dengan platform e-commerce menjadi jutawan Filipina secara instan. Logistik mungkin adalah bidang yang saya anjurkan untuk mendapatkan lebih banyak investasi, terutama karena bidang ini menarik lebih banyak pengusaha B2C. Anda akan melihat lebih banyak arus barang dan efisiensi logistik jarak jauh yang lebih baik dan sebagainya." - Carlo Chen-Delantar

 

"Kami melihat beberapa sisa-sisa representasi dari sektor swasta yang mengatakan bahwa kami perlu melindungi startup. Anda seharusnya tidak mencoba mempersulit startup karena kami ingin mereka berkembang. Untuk melakukan hal itu, Anda membutuhkan perwakilan sektor swasta yang menjelaskan cara kerja startup. Mereka benar-benar berbeda dari apa yang diketahui orang lain. Kami tidak membutuhkan kantor, kami harus sedikit lebih fleksibel. Segala sesuatunya sedang berubah. Pertanyaan tentang seberapa cepat adalah yang paling penting. Jadi, percepatan perubahan dan mendefinisikan startup di Filipina adalah hal yang dilakukan oleh Dewan Inovasi Nasional." - Carlo Chen-Delantar

Carlo Chen-Delantar, Mitra Pendiri Gobi-Core Philippine Fund & Kepala ESG di Gobi Partners, dan Jeremy Au membahas tiga tema utama:

1. Perjalanan Karier dari Dampak Sosial ke Modal Ventura: Carlo menceritakan perjalanannya dari keluarga pengusaha di Filipina hingga bekerja di sektor nirlaba, dengan fokus pada dampak sosial dan akses air bersih. Transisinya ke modal ventura tidak direncanakan, dipengaruhi oleh kesadaran akan potensi dampak melalui teknologi dan alokasi modal.

2. Laporan Startup Gobi & Alibaba Filipina: Carlo membahas lanskap startup yang sedang berkembang, pentingnya memahami ekosistem lokal, peran teknologi dalam kemajuan ekonomi dan sosial, serta tantangan dan peluang untuk startup. Ia menekankan kebutuhan struktural dan kebijakan untuk meningkatkan kemudahan berbisnis serta daya tarik, retensi, dan pelatihan talenta di seluruh negeri.

3. Segitiga Besi Pasar Negara Berkembang: Carlo menjelaskan konsep "Segitiga Besi" di pasar negara berkembang (fintech, e-commerce & logistik). Ia berbagi peluang FinTech secara spesifik dan menekankan pentingnya sistem identitas nasional dan peluang pertumbuhan (di sektor-sektor seperti teknologi kesehatan dan game) yang didorong oleh kaum muda dan cerdas secara digital.

Jeremy dan Carlo juga membahas tantangan dalam menjalankan bisnis, biaya brain drain, kebijakan pemerintah yang mempengaruhi startup, dan pentingnya pembangunan inklusif di berbagai wilayah di Filipina.

(01:50) Jeremy Au:

Hai Carlo, sangat senang sekali Anda bisa hadir di acara ini. Kami memiliki waktu yang menyenangkan untuk mendiskusikan Filipina dan Asia Tenggara dan kami merasa bahwa ini akan menjadi percakapan yang bagus untuk dilakukan. Bisakah Anda memperkenalkan diri dengan cepat?

(01:59) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Hai Jeremy, terima kasih telah menerima saya. Carlo Chan Dalantar. Saya adalah Mitra Pendiri untuk Gobi Corp Philippine Fund, dan secara regional saya adalah kepala ESG dan ekonomi sirkular untuk Mitra Gobi.

(02:09) Jeremy Au:

Menakjubkan. Jadi ceritakan lebih banyak tentang diri Anda. Seperti apa karier Anda sebelumnya?

(02:13) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Ya, jadi saya berasal dari keluarga produsen. Keluarga saya berasal dari Cebu, Filipina, lahir dan besar di sana. Orang tua saya benar-benar datang dari nol dan mereka adalah pengusaha. Jadi dengan industri ekspor, ini seperti masa kejayaan, masa keemasan ekspor di Filipina adalah dari tahun 90-an hingga awal 2000-an. Pada dasarnya, saya belajar semua akhir pekan kami berada di pabrik dan begitulah cara saya mengasah keterampilan kewirausahaan saya. Dan karena itu, dengan belajar mengekspor dan rantai pasokan, saya benar-benar mulai menjadi seorang wirausahawan, dan orang tua saya mengatakan kepada saya, jika Anda menginginkan mainan, Anda harus bekerja untuk itu. Jadi saya mulai menjual sepatu kets dan kaos hip-hop di sekolah menengah dan menghasilkan sekitar 500 per minggu dan saya sangat senang saat itu. Begitulah perjalanan saya dimulai.

Dan ketika saya pergi ke California untuk kuliah, saya benar-benar terpesona dengan sepatu Tom. Saat itu adalah masa-masa era wirausaha sosial di AS. Saya belajar banyak tentang hal itu, ingin membantu, kembali ke Filipina, dan membangun beberapa bisnis, termasuk lini fashion ramah lingkungan milik keluarga kami yang benar-benar membuat saya memiliki dampak. Dan, Anda tahu, segala sesuatunya dimulai dari sana. Dan seiring berjalannya waktu, saya rasa bagian paling penting yang benar-benar mengubah lintasan karier dan hidup saya adalah topan Yolanda. Ini terjadi pada tahun 2013 dan benar-benar berdampak pada jutaan warga Filipina. Dan kami juga menjadi bagian dari itu, namun kami sangat beruntung karena kami dapat pulih dengan mudah dan gelombang air masuk ke dalam hidup saya. Jadi saya menjalankan organisasi nirlaba selama sekitar tujuh tahun, dan masih berjalan. Sekarang kami telah mencapai 10 tahun. Kami telah membantu lebih dari 2 juta orang Filipina dengan akses air bersih. Dan itu benar-benar menunjukkan kepada saya bahwa teknologi dan dampak serta aliran pendanaan yang tepat dengan tim yang tepat, dengan teknologi yang tepat, dengan platform yang tepat, itu benar-benar menciptakan, menjadi sebuah inovasi, tetapi juga dampak untuk membantu, bukan? Dan itu sudah, jika kita berbicara tentang hati saya yang berdarah, itu selalu merupakan dampak sosial dalam arti itu. Dan sekarang, saya telah dibawa ke ruang VC. Jadi beberapa orang mengatakan bahwa saya telah berbelok ke sisi lain, namun saya melihatnya sebagai sebuah cara, terutama di Filipina. Ini adalah cara yang baik untuk menciptakan dampak pada saat ini ketika semuanya masih sangat langsung dengan penggunaan alokasi modal.

(04:17) Jeremy Au: Luar biasa. Dan bagaimana Anda bertransisi ke modal ventura?

(04:20) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Cerita yang sangat lucu, tidak pernah direncanakan. Saya kembali dari sebuah konferensi di Swiss pada tahun 2017 dan saya berpikir, wow, dunia sudah sangat berbeda saat ini. Sudah mengglobal. Dan saya melihat bahwa ruang nirlaba memiliki batas maksimalnya dan saya tahu bahwa jika dilakukan dengan benar, ini bisa menjadi tempat bagi lebih banyak pemimpin untuk berkembang.

Jadi saya berpikir tentang apa langkah selanjutnya untuk saya dan berbicara dengan mitra saya sekarang, Jason dan Ken, dan kami berkata, Hei, Anda tahu, kami masih muda. Kami memiliki jaringan, kami memiliki stamina. Mari kita ciptakan Jollibee berikutnya. Jadi itulah leluconnya, dan tiba-tiba saja, Jason, Managing Partner kami, berkata, Oh, bos saya dari New York mengatakan bahwa kami harus bertemu dengan pria dari Malaysia ini. Dia adalah mantan teman sekamar saya. Jadi, itu adalah Tom, dan Tom mengirim pesan kepada Jason dan berkata, Hei, datanglah ke Malaysia pada akhir pekan ini, dan kami akan mengajak Anda berkeliling. Dan banyak 12, 15 startup dari seluruh wilayah datang, menemui kami. Kami tidak tahu bahwa mereka melakukan presentasi kepada kami. Mereka ingin tahu tentang Filipina dan kami sangat terpesona. Dan kemudian pada akhir tahun 2017, kami sangat terpesona. Tidak ada yang terjadi di Filipina, bisa dikatakan demikian.

(05:21) Jeremy Au:

Ya, luar biasa. Jadi bagaimana rasanya, dan setidaknya selama beberapa tahun terakhir, Anda telah bekerja di Filipina dan ekosistem modal ventura. Seperti apa rasanya secara pribadi?

(05:28) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Saya akan mengatakan tahun 2017, sebagai seorang yang berkecimpung di bidang ini, bahkan saat masih berada di sisi nirlaba, saya melihat bahwa cepat atau lambat, cara terbaik untuk melihat kemajuan secara ekonomi, juga secara sosial, adalah dengan menggunakan teknologi, mengurangi biaya, membuat semua orang menjadi produktif dan efisien, dan saya melihat hal tersebut di sisi nirlaba, tetapi ketika saya mulai melihat, menjadi bagian dari VC, hal pertama yang kami katakan adalah, apakah ada peluang untuk memulai? Saya masih ingat pada saat itu G-cash dan Maya, mereka berjuang keras untuk mengajak semua orang bergabung. Jadi, ini adalah era yang baru lahir, tahun 2017 dan 2019 ini, saya akan mengatakan bahwa kami adalah gen nol atau gen satu dari para pendiri startup Filipina. Sekarang Anda tidak melihat mereka lagi. Mereka semua berkembang pesat.

Mereka mencoba mencari tahu lebih banyak hal. Ini semakin besar. Sangat luar biasa. Agak sulit pada saat itu karena pandemi benar-benar menjadi pengubah permainan karena semua orang benar-benar menggunakan teknologi sebagai sesuatu yang penting.

(06:24) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Jadi yang menarik adalah, Anda baru saja mengeluarkan laporan tentang ekosistem Filipina. Bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang mengapa Anda ingin menulis laporan ini?

(06:32) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Tentu saja. Jadi, ketika kami mengumumkan dana pertama kami, ini adalah tahun 2018, kami mulai menerapkannya pada tahun 2020. Kami mendapat banyak pitch deck yang masuk dan lebih dari itu, lebih dari seribu, kami menyadari jumlah data yang kami miliki, kami tidak bisa menyimpannya. Kami tidak mau, kami tidak mau. Jadi kami mulai berpikir tentang bagaimana jika kami dapat memberikan kembali kepada komunitas dan menggunakan ini sebagai platform untuk mendapatkan lebih banyak investasi dan lebih banyak pemain yang datang ke lapangan. Jadi, laporan ekosistem startup Filipina pertama kami diluncurkan pada tahun 2021. Dan saya masih ingat ketika membicarakannya di pekan startup Filipina, bahwa jika Anda mencari pertanda, inilah saatnya. Kami melihat bahwa, empat tahun terakhir sebelum digabungkan lebih rendah daripada tahun 2021 saja dalam hal pendanaan.

(07:14) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Jadi, hal ini benar-benar memulai pembicaraan bahwa kami harus melakukan ini setiap tahun, tetapi laporan tahunan tidak masuk akal karena perubahannya tidak akan terlalu drastis. Jadi kami melakukannya setiap dua tahun sekali. Dan tahun ini kami melihat ada lebih banyak laporan yang keluar untuk Filipina. Dan saya pikir perlu ada lebih banyak lagi, tetapi kami menyadari bahwa di luar Metro Manila, tidak ada cetak biru tentang bagaimana menjadi pendiri startup yang didanai di Filipina. Jadi kami berkata, kami memiliki beberapa pendiri Seri B dan Seri C. Bagaimana jika mereka meneruskannya? Dan itulah yang kami lakukan. Kami menyebutnya Founders Edition. Ini dibuat oleh para pendiri untuk para pendiri. Sebagian, kami ingin memberikan pembaruan pada ekosistem teknologi dengan metodologi yang tepat. Tetapi juga, benar-benar membantu pembangunan pedesaan, memiliki pendiri yang tidak hanya berasal dari Metro Manila atau internasional, tetapi memberikan kesempatan berjuang yang sama atau peluang yang sama bagi para pendiri, apakah Anda berada di Mindanao atau Visayas, Anda bisa menjadi petani, Anda bisa menjadi nelayan, Anda bisa menjadi orang yang sama sekali tidak berpendidikan. Kami ingin menyamakan kedudukan dan itulah yang terjadi. Dan sejauh ini berjalan dengan baik.

(08:15) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi, bisakah Anda berbagi lebih banyak tentang apa saja temuan utama Anda dari laporan tersebut?

(08:19) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Ada banyak hal yang bisa dibicarakan tentang hal itu, namun menurut saya bagian yang paling penting di sini adalah, apa saja sifat-sifat dan keahlian yang dicari oleh para investor dalam hal para pendiri. Kami juga memiliki area-area semudah area mana dalam hal model bisnis yang mereka cari, di mana Anda lulus secara demografis, hingga tren yang berbeda di bidang ini. Tetapi jika ada hal-hal spesifik yang Anda ingin saya bicarakan. Ini adalah laporan setebal 50 halaman, tapi saya bisa menyaringnya untuk Anda.

(08:45) Jeremy Au:

Saya suka dengan pernyataan pembuka yang Anda sampaikan tentang segitiga besi. Jadi, kita berbicara tentang bagaimana FinTech, e-commerce, dan logistik seperti lapisan konstruksi dasar untuk pasar negara berkembang. Jadi, itu adalah sesuatu yang merupakan tesis, bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang bagaimana hal itu terjadi?

(09:00) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Jadi, Segitiga Besi diciptakan oleh Jack Ma dari Alibaba. Dan itu adalah cara yang sangat sederhana dan mudah untuk mengukur bagaimana ekosistem digital dapat menjadi kuat, tetapi juga diperkuat. Jadi, Segitiga Besi terdiri dari tiga pilar. Anda memiliki Fintech, E-commerce, dan Logistik. Dan begitu Anda memiliki ini semua, maka akan mulai berkembang. Semakin berkembang, semakin banyak industri yang bergabung. Jadi e-commerce adalah alirannya, penjualan barang dan jasa secara digital, fintech adalah cara untuk bertukar nilai. Dan tentu saja, logistik, terutama jika Anda melihat barang fisik. Di Filipina, kami cukup beruntung karena fintech sangat progresif melalui dukungan bank sentral dan aliansi layanan fintech di sini. Ini sangat luar biasa. Pengiriman uang saja, secara global kembali ke Filipina. Ini adalah salah satu cara terbesar bagi ekonomi untuk beroperasi.

(09:52) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

E-commerce, fenomena budaya yang kita sukai dari jingle dan lagu-lagu kita. Ini benar-benar menjadi seperti situasi penambahan ke keranjang belanja. E-commerce benar-benar merupakan cara yang baik. Fakta menariknya, selama pandemi, lebih dari 10.000 UKM yang bergabung dengan platform e-commerce menjadi jutawan instan di Filipina. Jadi menurut saya, kedua hal tersebut sangat kuat, dan mereka benar-benar memimpin mayoritas pendanaan di Filipina. Namun, logistik mungkin adalah bidang yang saya anjurkan untuk mendapatkan lebih banyak investasi, terutama karena bidang ini menarik lebih banyak pengusaha B2C. Anda akan melihat lebih banyak arus barang dan efisiensi logistik last-mile yang lebih baik dan sebagainya. Filipina, tentu saja, adalah negara kepulauan. Kami memiliki hampir 8.000 pulau di wilayah ini, 7.00 pulau, dan jika Anda melihat wilayah ini, banyak produk yang datang dari Metro Manila atau dari Cina. Katakanlah Anda mengirim sesuatu ke Cebu atau dari Cebu ke Davao. Barang tersebut harus pergi ke Manila, lalu kembali ke Davao, sehingga pulau-pulau tersebut tidak benar-benar berbicara satu sama lain dan desentralisasi, serta efisiensi logistik dapat membuat atau menghancurkan perubahan dan mungkin beberapa unicorn muncul dari kota-kota tingkat kedua atau ketiga.

(10:57) Jeremy Au:

Jadi menurut saya, yang menarik adalah bahwa ada banyak hal yang mendasari pertumbuhan makro, bukan? Jadi, sebelumnya kami pernah membicarakan tentang usia muda orang Filipina secara keseluruhan di ASEAN sebagai populasi, pertumbuhan konsumen digital yang cepat dan mulai beralih ke dunia maya. Meningkatnya adopsi digitalisasi. Jadi sepertinya itu semua adalah kabar baik, bukan? Menurut Anda, apa saja aspek-aspek yang lebih sulit, mungkin pada tingkat makro sebelum Anda melihat ke berbagai vertikal yang berbeda, tetapi apakah ada hal-hal yang harus Anda pikirkan dari sisi makro?

(11:25) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Ya, populasi terbesar kedua di ASEAN, dan itu bagus, bank sentral yang progresif, sisi fintech, e-commerce, bagus. Kami melihat lebih banyak pendiri. Yang cenderung dilupakan untuk dibicarakan adalah kemudahan berbisnis di Filipina. Berdasarkan statistik, berbisnis di Filipina lebih sulit dibandingkan berbisnis di Kamboja. Jadi kami bukan negara ASEAN enam, kami sebenarnya adalah negara ASEAN tujuh dalam hal ini. Dan hal itu mengubah permainan. Bahkan di tingkat startup kami, ketika kami berinvestasi, kami melihat lebih baik di luar, setelah Anda mendominasi Metro Manila atau kota-kota utama seperti Cebu, Davao, Anda harus keluar terutama karena lebih murah untuk memulai lokasi baru dan mungkin di Ho Chi Minh dibandingkan dengan di kota-kota yang lebih kecil. Cara Filipina juga dirancang dengan cara yang sama, yaitu kami memiliki pemerintahan, pemerintahan presiden selama enam tahun. Kemudian Anda memiliki tingkat kongres, tingkat senator bisa empat atau tiga. Kemudian Anda memiliki tingkat lokal. Jadi, memikirkan semua izin di antaranya tidaklah menyenangkan. Namun, teknologi membuatnya agar aset Anda tetap hidup, Anda bisa bergerak dengan leluasa.

Tapi itu juga, bukan? Segala sesuatunya menjadi teratur. Apakah Anda merasa cocok di sini? Logistik memainkan peran besar, terutama ketika Anda menjual barang. Namun di luar itu, saya bahkan akan mengatakan bakat. Tentu saja, ini adalah isu global, namun di Filipina, ada yang disebut dengan brain drain. Banyak orang Filipina yang lebih suka dibayar dalam dolar daripada peso Filipina. Dan kita tahu bahwa ada banyak talenta Filipina yang mendunia, namun dalam hal daya saing, kita tidak sekompetitif dibandingkan dengan studi di luar negeri seperti di Vietnam. Jadi ada beberapa aspek yang perlu kita pelajari dari negara ASEAN enam atau tetangga ASEAN kita. Dan saya rasa hikmahnya adalah Filipina memang berada di urutan terakhir di antara enam negara ASEAN, namun kita bisa belajar dari perkembangan yang terjadi selama bertahun-tahun. Jadi, apakah itu Indonesia, sampai ke Vietnam, Thailand, dan ada banyak wawasan di sini, seperti pemikiran saya tentang di mana Filipina atau seperti apa ekosistem Filipina dalam hal itu. Jadi, menurut saya kedua hal tersebut sangat penting.

(13:24) Jeremy Au:

Saya rasa yang menarik adalah Anda telah menyebutkan bahwa kemudahan berbisnis adalah sesuatu yang harus ditingkatkan. Apakah ada contoh apa yang dimaksud dengan sulitnya berbisnis?

(13:33) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Ya, ada Undang-Undang Startup Inovatif yang ditulis oleh Senator Bam Aquino. Ini disetujui pada tahun 2019, dan pada dasarnya ada tiga hal yang terjadi. Visa Startup, Keringanan Pajak untuk Startup, dan Dana Ventura Startup, yang merupakan satu-satunya yang sudah berjalan, namun masih dalam tahap penerapan. Akhirnya, mereka mulai menerapkannya tahun ini. Jadi menurut saya, Startup Venture Fund, yang krusial di sini adalah mereka akan, jika Anda mengajukan permohonan untuk menjadi mitra investasi bersama, dan kami mengundang semua investor di kawasan ini untuk masuk, mereka akan mencocokkannya. Tapi ini masih tahap awal. Kemudian mereka juga berharap dapat menggunakan program Fund of Funds mereka. Jadi itu adalah bagian penting dari Startup Venture Fund.

Dua aspek lainnya mungkin yang paling sulit dilakukan. Saat ini, tidak ada. Setiap orang asing yang ingin bekerja di Filipina. Hanya ada satu di bawah visa kerja. Seharusnya ada dan undang-undang ini sebenarnya meniru undang-undang Visa Startup Malaysia dan Singapura, bukan? Jadi, visa kerja pelacakan cepat akan menjadi cara terbaik untuk melakukannya. Itu akan menjadi hal kedua. Dan yang terakhir, pembebasan pajak untuk perusahaan rintisan. Tentu saja, kami menyebutnya BIR, Biro Pendapatan Internal, atau kementerian pajak. Mereka tidak ingin pendapatan mereka turun karena liburan. Namun seperti yang kita semua tahu, pembebasan pajak memotivasi orang untuk berinvestasi, dalam sebuah perekonomian. Dan saya pikir ketika hal itu terjadi, maka akan sedikit lebih mudah, namun seperti yang Anda tahu, ada cara untuk mengatasinya. Namun, begitu Anda mendapatkannya, saya pikir, hal itu benar-benar melengkapi ekosistem teknologi yang kuat ini.

Pemerintah sedang berusaha keras sekarang. Mereka telah mengerahkan dan mendanai lebih dari $11,4 juta sejak tahun 2019, dan segala sesuatunya terus bergerak. Dan hal yang paling penting dari pemerintah di Filipina adalah masyarakat Filipina sangat kritis dan vokal dalam hal penggunaan uang. Dan memang seharusnya begitu. Jadi saya pikir apa yang penting sekarang adalah memberikan kesadaran bahwa pemerintah tidak bisa melakukan 0 sampai 100. Ini adalah 0 sampai 10, 10 sampai 30. 30 ke 50, dan seterusnya dan seterusnya. Jadi ini akan memakan waktu yang cukup lama. Namun dengan pemerintahan presiden ini, ini adalah tahun kedua mereka. Sekarang kita punya waktu sekitar empat atau lima tahun untuk benar-benar membalikkan keadaan dan saya sangat optimis.

(15:34) Jeremy Au:

Adakah kebijakan atau perubahan pemerintah lainnya yang menurut Anda sangat penting bagi para pendiri atau orang-orang yang sedang membangun ekosistem Filipina untuk diperhatikan.

(15:42) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Yang cukup menarik, ketika kami melakukan survei, banyak pendiri yang tidak bergantung pada pemerintah. Saya pikir itu adalah pola pikir yang bagus. Jika Anda adalah sektor swasta, Anda harus kreatif dan tangguh, banyak akal, bahkan di bidang ini, tetapi pemerintah benar-benar menentukan bagaimana ekosistem dapat berkembang dari nilai 1 hingga 100. Jadi, hal yang paling menarik yang muncul tahun ini sebenarnya adalah NEDA, yang menangani sebagian besar perencanaan infrastruktur dan ekonomi Filipina. Mereka baru saja meluncurkan Dewan Inovasi Nasional. Dan pada dasarnya tujuannya adalah untuk memiliki semua sekretaris dari semua lembaga pemerintah dan sektor swasta.

(16:18) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Jadi kami melihat beberapa sisa-sisa perwakilan dari sektor swasta yang mengatakan bahwa kami perlu melindungi perusahaan rintisan. Anda seharusnya tidak mencoba mempersulit startup karena kami ingin mereka berkembang. Dan untuk melakukan hal itu, Anda membutuhkan perwakilan dari sektor swasta yang mengatakan bahwa beginilah cara kerja perusahaan rintisan. Mereka benar-benar berbeda dari apa yang Anda ketahui. Kami tidak membutuhkan kantor. Kita harus sedikit lebih fleksibel. Semua hal ini benar-benar muncul. Sebagai gambaran, beberapa kantor masih menggunakan mesin ketik, seperti di kantor pemerintahan. Jadi ini adalah sebuah kemunduran, namun Anda membutuhkan representasi dan kesadaran bahwa hal-hal ini bisa terjadi. Jadi banyak hal yang berubah. Pertanyaan tentang seberapa cepat mungkin yang paling penting. Jadi percepatan perubahan adalah sesuatu yang dilakukan oleh Dewan Inovasi Nasional dan juga mendefinisikan startup di Filipina. Ketika Anda mengatakan startup di Filipina, itu tidak didefinisikan sebagai startup teknologi, tetapi lebih kepada bisnis, baik itu bisnis yang baru dimulai atau UKM dengan model yang inovatif. Dan inovatif di sini sangat luas cakupannya. Bisa jadi Anda menjual sesuatu seperti sachet, tetapi Anda sebenarnya tidak menjual sachet, atau Anda melakukan sesuatu yang dimungkinkan oleh teknologi. Jadi sangat cair dalam hal ini.

(17:21) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Hal lain yang Anda sebutkan tentu saja adalah kondisi talenta dan lanskap di Filipina. Bisakah Anda berbagi lebih banyak tentang hal itu?

(17:28) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Keadaan bakat. Jadi begini, bagian baiknya adalah jika Anda berada di bidang STEM atau di bidang IT, karyawan junior, menengah, dan senior dari industri apa pun. Gaji Anda akan 30 hingga 40% lebih tinggi dari industri lainnya. Itu adalah fakta. Sekarang, dalam hal pendidikan, untuk mendukung lebih banyak orang yang masuk ke industri tersebut, itu jelas kurang. Dan menjamurnya kamp pelatihan di Filipina menjadi jauh lebih unggul sekarang. Dan banyak konglomerat sekarang menyadari bahwa mereka perlu meningkatkan kualitas karyawan mereka agar dapat bersaing.

(18:01) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Jadi, dalam hal orang Filipina, dan di sinilah letak seluruh penjajaran tentang di mana Filipina bisa menjadi sebuah ekosistem. Filipina, ada kemungkinan menjadi lahan CBC, seperti Thailand, atau bisa juga menjadi Indonesia di mana ada banyak startup yang bersaing untuk model bisnis yang sama, atau campuran keduanya. Kita bisa saja memiliki Vietnam, tetapi kondisi talenta berarti kita perlu memotivasi dan menarik warga Filipina untuk kembali dan membangun startup, tetapi juga mencari tahu di mana Anda bisa menemukan para CTO ini? Saya memiliki beberapa ide liar, seperti, untuk memotivasi dan menarik talenta, Anda perlu membuat rumah pengembang di Boracay atau Siargao atau di pantai. Biaya sewanya lebih murah. Anda bisa membuat bootcamp. Internet sekarang sangat cepat dengan Starlink. Ini adalah cara yang baik untuk membuat biaya yang dibawa pulang menjadi lebih baik. Saya rasa itu adalah cara yang baik untuk melakukannya. Tetapi juga maju terus di ruang ini di mana kita tidak melihat terlalu banyak. Saya kira itu juga sibuk, bukan? Efek pengganda belum dimulai, tapi begitu kita memiliki beberapa unicorn, narasinya akan berubah. Oke, seorang pendiri startup bisa sangat sukses hanya dengan berkecimpung di dunia teknologi.

Jadi, kami melihat hal itu sebagai bagian yang sangat penting, Zeitgeist telah berubah, sebelumnya, para pekerja magang atau lulusan baru dari universitas-universitas ternama akan langsung bekerja di firma-firma akuntansi. Sekarang mereka hanya ingin langsung ke perusahaan teknologi, jadi saya rasa sudah mulai mengarah ke sana. Namun, talenta teknologi itu sendiri dan alasan utama mengapa transaksi di Filipina menjadi sedikit mahal dalam dua tahun terakhir adalah impor talenta untuk membangun teknologi. Kami juga melihat tren, yang cukup lucu, bahwa banyak pendiri Filipina yang memiliki CTO dari India atau tenaga kerja dari India yang membangunnya. Dan saya pikir itu juga bisa menjadi pertanda kurangnya talenta di Filipina, tetapi bisa juga berarti hal ini bisa melompati semua hal lainnya.

(19:41) Jeremy Au:

Bisakah Anda berbagi lebih banyak tentang apa yang Anda maksud dengan impor talenta?

(19:43) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Ya. Beberapa startup di sini, terutama di sisi tahap pertumbuhan, beberapa Head of Product, Head of Engineers, Product Manager, mereka berasal dari Indonesia, India, Singapura, atau bahkan sampai ke Eropa, membangun teknologinya dan Anda memiliki insinyur junior yang mungkin ada di Filipina atau tidak, mereka mengalihdayakannya, bukan? Jadi kita melihat banyak hal seperti itu. Saya tahu beberapa perusahaan rintisan mempekerjakan, mengimpor talenta untuk menarik insinyur Filipina untuk masuk. Ini juga terkait dengan kualitas, bukan? Waktu adalah uang, kualitas talenta, atau setidaknya produk yang mereka ciptakan belum memiliki kualitas global. Dan tentu saja saya tidak ingin menggeneralisasi, tapi ada beberapa yang menarik yang benar-benar membangunnya.

Saya ingin sekali mengundang Jake dari Expedock. Dia memiliki cerita yang bagus tentang bagaimana dia menemukan berlian di Filipina dan modelnya di kadet dan bahkan Ragdiff dari ChatGenie. Itu adalah sesuatu yang sedang kami bangun bahkan sebagai VC, yaitu bagaimana kami dapat menciptakan seluruh jalur insinyur dan talenta untuk bidang ini.

(20:40) Jeremy Au:

Dan seperti mengklik dua kali ke beberapa vertikal di sini, kami berbicara tentang sisi fintech, logistik, tetapi juga sisi game, Anda tahu, sektor yang sedang naik daun dan teknologi kesehatan juga. Apa yang paling menarik bagi Anda sebagai sesuatu yang membuat Anda tertarik atau penasaran dari semua sektor vertikal yang Anda sebutkan dalam laporan ini?

(20:56) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Kami memiliki data, tetapi juga data dan wawasan. Mereka memberi Anda, mereka melukiskan sebuah gambaran, tetapi kami juga memiliki bias. Saya melihat sebelum kami menyelesaikan laporan ini, hal pertama yang saya katakan. Oke, ada yang tidak beres dalam pikiran saya, saya pikir selama ini, model bisnis B2C dan startup adalah model yang dominan di Filipina. Saya salah. Itu sebenarnya B2B. Dan itu masuk akal sekarang. Agar B2C dapat berjalan, sekali lagi, kembali ke Segitiga Besi, sisi logistik perlu didukung agar lebih banyak startup B2C yang muncul di sini. Sulit untuk bersaing dengan Lazada dan Shopee di ruang tersebut. Dan bahkan Lazada dan Shopee bisa dibilang memiliki salah satu armada logistik terbesar di Filipina. Jadi ini menciptakan, mulai menjadi duopoli, tetapi kami ingin lebih banyak pemain yang masuk ke ruang ini. Contoh yang bagus, baru-baru ini InDrive masuk, mereka baru saja mendapatkan izin untuk memulai aplikasi pemesanan kendaraan di Filipina dan mereka akan mulai menjadi pesaing Grab. Jadi saya pikir itu adalah bagian yang krusial.

Dalam hal di mana model bisnis dapat masuk, saya pikir gelombang model FinTech baru akan muncul, terutama sekarang ini. Anda memiliki platform dasar yang sudah ada seperti Gcash dan Maya, mereka menciptakan aplikasi super, tetapi saya pikir akan ada beberapa pendatang baru yang dapat menggunakan lapisan dasar dari platform dompet elektronik ini untuk melakukannya. Dan saya juga sangat terkejut bahwa meskipun mereka dijalankan oleh bank dan perusahaan telekomunikasi, mereka masih menginginkan dompet elektronik, Anda tahu, di Thailand, mereka tidak menginginkan dompet elektronik karena ada biaya tambahan sebesar 3 sampai 5 persen. Tetapi menariknya, dompet elektronik benar-benar menjadi tren di Filipina.

Kami optimis dengan game, media, dan hiburan terutama karena audiens global Filipina dan budaya Filipina belum dimanfaatkan secara eksponensial. Anda memiliki K pop, Anda memiliki budaya Jepang, tetapi budaya Filipina, stereotip orang Filipina adalah Anda bernyanyi atau menari, tetapi Anda tahu, bagaimana kami dapat menjadikannya sebagai cara untuk meningkatkan fenomena dan adopsi budaya.

Kami juga melihat banyak hal di bidang kesehatan dan pendidikan. Hal ini merupakan hal yang fundamental bagi Filipina. Jadi saya akan mulai dari sana dan kemudian di sana, ada lebih banyak perubahan yang terjadi dari waktu ke waktu. Blockchain sangat panas di Filipina. Pertukaran mendapatkan banyak pengawasan regulasi saat ini, tetapi ada begitu banyak aspek. Saya pikir pertukaran valas dan arbitrase dalam blockchain masih belum ada. Web3 masih berjuang, tetapi benar-benar berusaha mempertahankan relevansinya di Filipina. Jadi saya pikir ada hal itu, tetapi saya juga ingin membuat pengungkapan di sana. Banyak dari para pendiri ini berasal dari daerah atau berasal dari Metro Manila, Visayas, dan Mindanao. Kami tidak melihat tingkat yang sama untuk startup yang didanai, dan kami ingin mengubahnya juga. Dan itulah alasan mengapa kami membuat laporan ini. Menurut saya, hal yang paling penting dari banyak pendiri startup adalah lanskap pendanaan. Kami bahkan menambahkan Monk's Hill di sana dan menunjukkan di mana Anda mendapatkan pendanaan? Ini adalah sebuah contekan, bukan? Jika Anda mendapatkan dana dari tahap awal hingga pertumbuhan, lokal, internasional, Anda dapat melihatnya sebagai cara untuk mempercepat penggalangan dana.

(23:49) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya pikir salah satu statistik menarik yang muncul bagi saya adalah bahwa hanya 46% penduduk Filipina yang memiliki rekening bank dibandingkan dengan Indonesia yang mencapai 51%. Vietnam adalah 60%. Malaysia, 88%, Thailand, 94%, dan Singapura 97%. Jadi saya pikir itu adalah statistik yang cukup menarik. Saya pikir, maksud saya, saya sudah mengetahuinya dari segi kualitatif, tapi sangat menyenangkan melihat grafik itu keluar. Maksud saya, saya merasa itu adalah salah satu kesenjangan terbesar, saya akan mengatakan perbedaan terbesar, menurut saya. Apa pendapat Anda tentang hal itu?

(24:15) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Ya, saya rasa itulah alasan mengapa fintech masih tetap kuat sebagaimana mestinya. Banyak hal telah berubah. Mereka mengatakan, 10% dari total populasi bank akan memiliki kartu kredit. Sisanya masih menggunakan kartu debit. Dan beberapa dari mereka melewatkan semua itu dan hanya memiliki dompet elektronik. Menurut saya, bagian penting dari pertumbuhan ini adalah sistem identitas nasional. Sekarang lebih mudah karena katakanlah Anda ingin membuat paspor. Ada sekitar 15 jenis kartu identitas yang dikeluarkan pemerintah yang perlu Anda gunakan. Namun, ketika Anda memiliki sistem ID nasional, Anda bisa menunjukkan bahwa ID tersebut bagus. Jadi Landbank, yang merupakan pengembangan pemerintah di Filipina, ketika sistem ID nasional masuk, mereka telah menerima hampir 10 juta rekening bank baru, bukan? Pertanyaan sebenarnya adalah, pengguna bank yang aktif adalah bagian yang sangat penting dan mengorientasikan mereka untuk menggunakan produk digital akan menjadi langkah selanjutnya. Dan seperti yang Anda ketahui, tidak pernah nol sampai 100. Mungkin Anda bisa mulai dari nol hingga 50%. 20 atau 5 persen berikutnya sangat mahal. Sulit untuk menutup kesenjangan tersebut, namun menurut saya hal ini sangat menarik.

Namun, sebelum itu semua karena pekerjaan, kami membutuhkan konektivitas internet yang tepat di seluruh rantai. Saya senang mengatakan bahwa Thailand memiliki salah satu konektivitas terbaik. Jadi, Anda bisa pergi ke gua, Anda masih bisa mendapatkan 5G. Di Filipina, Anda baru saja keluar dari kota, Anda sudah mulai jerawatan. Jadi, hal-hal seperti inilah yang benar-benar penting. Tapi ya, Anda akan melihat banyak adopsi setelah toko-toko sari-sari atau kami menyebutnya seperti warung di Indonesia. Ini adalah cara yang baik untuk mendapatkan adopsi pada demografi tertentu. Namun, Gen Z dan milenial mungkin adalah yang pertama. Mereka benar-benar mengambil sebagian besar adopsi di ruang tersebut.

(25:44) Jeremy Au:

Mengenai hal itu, bisakah Anda berbagi tentang saat-saat yang secara pribadi membuat Anda berani?

(25:47) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Saya adalah orang yang berani, Anda tahu, mengambil lompatan dari organisasi nirlaba yang lebih berdampak ke bidang keuangan. Saya tidak berasal dari latar belakang keuangan, namun saya telah membayar iuran dan mendapatkan rasa hormat dari ekosistem karena saya terus mendengarkan. Saya hanya memastikan bahwa saya memiliki ruang saya sendiri. Integritas tetap terjaga. Dan saya memberikan nilai. Mitra saya memberikan sudut pandang keuangan. Saya telah belajar banyak dari hal tersebut sekarang. Dan sebenarnya, yang terpenting adalah kejujuran dengan siapa Anda berbicara, bukan? Berkomunikasi. Tidak masalah jika Anda tidak memiliki semua jawaban. Dan dibutuhkan banyak keberanian untuk menjadi rendah hati dan rentan dalam ruang itu. Dan dengan itu, Anda mengundang komunitas yang tepat. Maksud saya, berbicara dengan Anda, kita tidak akan berkenalan jika bukan karena komunitas yang memberi tahu saya bahwa saya berada di Singapura. Anda perlu bertemu dengan orang-orang yang tepat seperti Anda. Dan kami berbicara tentang bagaimana Anda bisa masuk Forbes. Saya rasa itu juga lucu, bukan? Jadi, semua hal tersebut dan menjadi berani juga berarti terkadang tidak ada jalan yang tepat di depan Anda dan Anda harus melaluinya. Jika Anda memiliki naluri dan ada sesuatu di sana, bagus. Jika tidak, Anda berbalik, cari tempat lain. Jadi saya pikir itu saja. Itu adalah moral dan juga kompas yang perlu Anda perbaiki. Kadang-kadang Anda hanya perlu membenturkan kompas itu dan kompas itu akan mengarahkan sesuatu.

(26:56) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Terima kasih banyak telah berbagi. Saya ingin merangkum tiga hal penting yang saya dapatkan dari percakapan ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang perjalanan pribadi Anda. Senang sekali mendengar tentang bagaimana Anda berasal dari keluarga pengusaha dan sangat fokus untuk memberi kembali dan bekerja di komunitas. Dan bagaimana Anda akhirnya bertransisi ke modal ventura sebagai cara untuk membantu membangun ekosistem startup Filipina di masa depan untuk masyarakat juga.

Kedua, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang bagaimana Anda bisa menulis laporan Gobi di Filipina. Dan saya merasa sangat menarik untuk berbicara tentang makro, bukan hanya peluang, tetapi juga beberapa tantangan. Dan saya pikir itu sangat mencerahkan untuk berbicara tentang bagaimana kemudahan berbisnis adalah sesuatu yang merupakan prioritas utama dan langkah penting bagi Filipina untuk maju dan membantu mempermudah startup lain untuk muncul, serta pasar talenta dalam hal kemampuan untuk mengimpor dan mempertahankan talenta yang dapat membantu membangun perusahaan-perusahaan ini ke tahap pengembangan berikutnya.

Terakhir, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang beberapa vertikal tertentu. Anda berbicara tentang FinTech, misalnya, di mana ada peluang bagi semua rel untuk dibangun dan bagaimana ID digital adalah komponen besar dan prasyarat untuk menjadi sukses. Saya pikir juga menarik bagi Anda untuk berbagi pandangan Anda tentang Segitiga Besi antara fintech, logistik, dan e-commerce, dan bagaimana Anda melihat hal itu terus berkembang di Filipina.

Untuk itu, terima kasih banyak, Carlo, karena telah berbagi pandangan Anda.

(28:18) Carlo Chen-Delantar:

Terima kasih, Jeremy. Sangat menikmati pembicaraan ini.