Fandy Cendrajaya: Indonesia Bull vs. Bear Market, Founding Kopital Ventures and Tough Startup Exit Environment & Strategy - E364

· Indonesia,VC and Angels,Podcast Episodes,Failure

 

“A lot of people are very bearish now and a lot of investment thesis has changed. What was super hot in 2020 and 2021 isn’t as hot today. Even VCs are more quiet nowadays. Back in the day, we were very focused on anything that can produce large GMV because, at the time, the thesis was large GMV, large market size. If you convert a small percentage of that, there'll be a hundred, 200 million dollar revenue company, but that does not happen to be the case nowadays. A lot of people look for something more tangible like revenue, and even the pre-seed stage looks at a lot of companies that are EBITDA positive.That's the way it should be because when you talk about real tech innovations, the first question is whether the talent is even ready to make something that's on a global scale. When you talk about tech, it has to be global. When I look at Indonesia, it's a consumer-driven country. It makes sense that a lot of the investments are more consumer-driven, more agriculture because that's what Indonesia is rich in. The current market dynamic is more sustainable in the long run.” - Fandy Cendrajaya

“Be careful about the valuation. We talked about how in 2020, and 2021, we viewed post-money valuation as a success metric. We shouldn’t do that anymore. We should raise what we need at a conservative valuation as possible, just because of the exit landscape. We should work backward. If we feel that our company can go to $500 million, maybe the last round that you want to be raising private equity at, before eventually going public or whatever the case may be, is $100 million because the last investors have to have that upside.So, work backward, and pre-stage, I would always recommend people not to go above 10 million just because if you work backward, it will be quite difficult if you raise at 20 or 30.There have been success stories that you raise at 20, but you can still build into the valuation the next year. More often than not, the lower the valuation, the better it is for the founders and the dilution is kept at a minimum.” - Fandy Cendrajaya

“The way we think about it is we have to always put the LPs’ interest first. Even if there's a lot of upside for me on the table, how many companies have gone on to a high valuation and have suddenly just stagnated there? A lot of them have, and it will be very prudent, at least for my end as a fund manager, to take some exits first whenever there's a chance because you never know what may happen in the future. That's what I always advise founders as well. Nobody's telling you to exit fully, but this is your company. You don't want to just make money off your salary. If you want to do that, you want to find something more stable, and the life of a founder is the opposite of a stable life. There's a possibility of exiting.” - Fandy Cendrajaya

In this discussion, Fandy Cendrajaya, Founding Partner of Kopital Ventures, and Jeremy Au talked about three main themes:

1. Indonesia Bear vs. Bull Market: Fandy talked about Indonesia’s evolving market sentiment from the bullish 2020-2021 to the more cautious investor sentiment in from 2022 to 2024. He shared the importance of being realistic in comparing Indonesia vs. benchmark startups in larger markets like India, China, and the US. He also explained the nuances of the local tech ecosystem across commodity-based growth, consumer-driven trends, and localization requirements.

2. Founding Kopital Ventures: Fandy described building Kopital Ventures with his cofounder who shared the same vision and complementary skill sets. He explained their LP fundraising approach by emphasizing their seed-only investments without follow-on funding, allowing them to collaborate with other VCs.

3. Tough Startup Exits & Strategy: Fandy emphasized the scarcity of significant exit opportunities for startups in Southeast Asia, which affects how VCs should both invest and counsel their portfolio companies. He talked about the IPO and stock performance of startups GoTo, Grab, and Bukalapak on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX), and how this local listing approach contrasts with the US IPO strategy. He underscored why founders should therefore be more thoughtful and agile in their exit strategies, thus setting benchmarks for valuations and investor expectations better.

Jeremy and Fandy also discussed the importance of looking at company valuation comparables, the nuances of angel investing, and the significance of empathy in working with founders.

Supported by Hive Health

Are you expanding or launching a business in the Philippines? Ensuring your employees' good health is key to attracting and retaining top talent. That's where Hive Health comes in, especially for startups and small to medium-sized businesses. They specialize in providing top-quality and hassle-free healthcare plans tailored to your workplace. Learn more at www.ourhivehealth.com

(02:07) Jeremy Au:

Hey Fandy, really excited to have you in the show. I still remember having that great coffee. And then at the start of you starting out launching the fund and now here you are and everyone's like, Oh, have you heard of Fandy? He's look at this and look at that. I'm like, okay, you got to be on a podcast now that you're up and running. So yeah, please introduce yourself.

(02:25) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Well, thanks, Jeremy, for having me here. Obviously, you remember the coffee and very appreciative that SN and you have always been very supportive of us and very collaborative. So a bit about my background. I'm the founding partner of Kopital Ventures. Kopital Ventures is a pre-seed, seed-stage-focused fund. We are Southeast Asian. We have a Southeast Asian mandate, but we have a particular focus in Indonesia, just because that's where our background is. initially before Kopital Ventures, I was also running Kopital Network, an informal angel network made up of founders and execs from the leading internet companies in Indonesia. Together with the members of Kopital Network, with various members, we have invested in 30-plus companies over the last two to three years. I am very proud to say that all the companies we've invested in thus far have raised full-on funding and we have managed to secure for events and have a DPI of around 1.6, 1.7 from the past 3 years of investments. So, obviously, with that result, my partner and I decided to actually go out there and raise some external capital to actually invest in early-stage companies.

We feel with a fund compared to being an angel investor, we'll be able to create more impact for the founders, just because we'll be able to have more stake, we'll be able to make things more formalized, and we'll have more resources to help them with. So that's a bit about my professional background. A lot of the past few years before that, I was in the traditional industry. I was an entrepreneur, who never reached the success that other entrepreneurs that have been on this platform have. Experienced a lot of failures and ended up, even though I experienced a lot of failures, managed to save up some money. That's when I started angel investing in 2020. So luckily enough for me, I actually met Edward and James, the cofounders of Kopi Kenangan in 2016. When I first graduated and came back from the US in 2020, one of the reasons why I stopped working in the traditional industry was because COVID came, everything sort of slowed down. At that time, Kopi Kenangan was also reaching the peak of its popularity. So they, Edwin and James also have started to mature as founders and have started angel investing. So that was when I decided to start angel investing with them. They were gracious enough to allow me to do that together.

(04:30) Jeremy Au: Yeah. So can you share a little bit more about how you started angel investing you're part of the corporate dial network, right? So that's in 2020 before, Kopitalas a fund came up. So can you share a little bit more about what the experience was like?

(04:41) Fandy Cendrajaya:

About angel investing in general. I mean, it was great, right? It was something very new to me personally, and meeting a lot of founders at the early stage, especially in the early days, I used to invest in public equities a lot. So actually most of my financial success comes from public equities, if any. Therefore, when I first met early-stage founders asking for a four or 5 million valuation, that was a culture shock for me. And some even ask for double-digit valuation off the bat. I didn't know how to evaluate the company and, in the early stage. So that was a shock.

And then eventually, after listening to multiple pitches, I just realized that the market at that time was at its peak. at the same time, we can't look at the startup like how we look at traditional businesses, even though valuations were ridiculous that day in 2020, and 2021. There's a reason why valuations are in the millions, even in the pre-seed stage, because you obviously need that amount of capital in the early days to actually do something with it, to run with it. To find product market fit, to get proof of concept, to get traction. Otherwise, there's no business that you can build because every business needs capital. So that was the biggest thing for me, the Altshare shop, and also just how different every founder is. I think that's something else. A lot of founders came in 2020, and 2021 with intentions of just fundraising. So a lot of them are just saying a lot of them are showing me tables of comparables from other markets, which may not apply to Indonesia, especially like, obviously India, China, and the US are just way bigger markets and the people there culturally are just very different, right? But at the same time, there was something that I learned a lot as well, but of course, there are that few founders who are still, like, actually starting up just. With the right intention, which is to build something identify a problem, and try to solve that problem with their company.

(06:24) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, 2020 was a big time, right? And I remember, Indonesia was very hot in 2020. So, so many companies, so many founders, and also a lot of valuations were going up pretty high during that time frame. And a lot of people also started angel investing during that time as well. So that was, maybe too much time at home maybe. So, you know, I guess my, from your perspective is, what were some dynamics that you saw from the Indonesia market from that 2020 versus today?

(06:50) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I think a lot of people are just very bearish now, right? A lot of investment thesis has changed. What was super hot in 2020, 2021 wasn't as hot as well today. And. Even VCs are more quiet nowadays, right? In terms of sector focus back in the day, we were very focused on anything that could produce large GMV because at the time the thesis was obviously large GMV, large market size. If you just convert a small percentage of that, there'll be a hundred, 200 million dollar revenue company, but that does not happen to be the case.

And nowadays, a lot of people myself included look for something more tangible. Right? Like revenue and like even the pre-seed stage nowadays. Look at a lot of companies that are EBITDA positive, which I think is great, right? I think that's the way it should be. Because when you talk about real innovation, tech innovations, the first question is the talent even ready to actually make something that's of a global scale? Because when you talk about tech, it has to be global. We don't use, for example. Microsoft that's made in Indonesia, right? We use Microsoft. That's obviously Microsoft. A lot of the software has, anytime you make a tag, it has to be global scale.

So when we, when I look at Indonesia, it's a commodity-driven country, consumer-driven country, very consumptive. So it makes sense that a lot of the investments nowadays are more consumer-driven are more agriculture, because that's what Indonesia is rich in. So, I think the market correction, the current market dynamic is proof is more sustainable in the long run.

(08:12) Jeremy Au:

And also you, you mentioned that, you know, founders at that time were very much like, you know, using a lot of comparables, right? So global comparables and focus on fundraising. Do you think the sentiment has changed amongst founders today as well?

(08:23) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I think some founders still do that. I mean, it does. Comparables do make sense for some sectors, right? But for the most part, for me personally, I don't really, I think that's the last thing that I look at just because I Just because obviously I've previously been an entrepreneur myself, a small-time entrepreneur myself, and I'm very, I'm quite realistic, right? those comparables are sort of where you hope to be with that kind of market. So it may not be applicable for the local context. But then I think a lot of founders, typically the ones that have never been operators tend to use it more often than not. Yeah.

(08:55) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. How should a founder use it? I mean, obviously, it makes sense. I've done that before when I was a founder fundraiser. I mean, I'd say these are the comparables in the Of course, at that time I was building a company in the US right? So I was comparing against

(09:06) Fandy Cendrajaya:

It's much different.

(09:08) Jeremy Au:

It's like not too bad, right? It's Hey, when Boston, New York, this is the SF, but of course now it's like Singapore, Indonesia, I don't know, Hong Kong, China, global benchmarks. Right. But how do you think people should go about talking about that? I guess.

(09:20) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Just in terms of how it works in that particular market, right, that particular context is just very different. So, that's something that people have to really specify. I think, for example, how it works in India, how it works in the US, how it works in China. A lot of, for example, a lot of people build social commerce. Obviously, in Chinese, Pinduoduo and others have been a huge success. And when you apply it to Indonesia hasn't been the case thus far for certain categories, right? sO obviously not very applicable. But at the same time, does that mean social commerce is a bad business model? No, I don't think it is. I think it just depends on the category you're in. So that's how you should apply it instead of like, hey, Pintoto works here. It must work in Indonesia.

(09:56) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, I definitely heard that before.

(09:57) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Yeah. The method of X. Like, quick commerce in 2021.

(10:02) Jeremy Au:

Oh, that was hot, 2021.

(10:03) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Right? Yeah.

(10:04) Jeremy Au:

It was so hot. I was always so confused as well.

(10:06) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I mean, at that time, it was like gorillas, and I think there was another one, right? There's a multi-billion dollar, so now Zepto, obviously, recently still raised a huge amount of capital. So I think a lot of the investors, myself included, invested in a quick commerce back then. It was busy. It was just based on comparison, right? I don't think there is anything that can tell you otherwise.

(10:26) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And I think the tricky part, as you said, is that you do it by comparables, but then it's by analogy, right? But then if your market is US, is tier one, and then it's like a tier one city, like SF or New York, then you go all the way down to GDP per capita. You go to the urban design, and the local market power can be quite different. Yeah, QuickCommerce folks have really struggled because it turns out that the value of the basket is quite different, right? It's quite hard to make money if you're, moving a bag of rice, you know, so, you know, it's just very heavy, very bulky, and it's one bag of rice. It's just can't make money. At least you get the charges to the customer, right? (11:02)

(11:02) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Yup. And unfortunately, actually, to add to that, I think even myself included, looking at the comparables, I just, at that time, not looking at things too deeply, just thought it would work as well, right? Maybe it might still work, never say never, I guess, but obviously, as you mentioned, people have been having a hard time. And when there are those comparables, when you put too much focus on that, you tend to be biased, regardless of the amount of research you do. You're just going to say, Oh, this works in this market. Look at the amount of funds they raise. Probably work in our market too.

And so I think that's where for me personally, I've learned to look at comparables and start to discount it a lot just because it works there doesn't mean so as so that I don't get too biased as well in terms of how I review a company and the sector.

(11:41) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. I think one version I saw that it works. I mean, I'm not saying that it's a great, huge, you know, breakout success, but I saw that one product category that works for quick commerce is like cigarettes and vapes because it's high value. It's small. It's portable. And when people want it now. So it's quite interesting to see that some products can fit that value chain in that sense as well.

So what is interesting is that obviously for yourself, Kopital, you've built it out with an investment thesis of being focused on early stage founders. Could you share a little bit more about what are the things that differentiate Kopital from other VC funds?

(12:12) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I guess the thing that differentiates Kopital is that I always tell this to people, we're not a value-added PC. We try to, well, we don't, we try not to over promise and I think our equity will reflect that we don't look for double-digit equity. We look for 3 to 4, 3 to 7% max, because that hopefully reflects the amount of work we'll put in and we don't double down in terms of investing in the next round or follow-on rounds, because we don't want to give any bad signaling to the companies that we don't double down in because if you double down automatically, you're going to be more focused in helping that particular company compared to other company because you have more stake. That's probably going to return your fund, or at least you hope it will. So that's the difference. And also my partners.

So my partner is a founder of Kopi Kenangan. One of I think the first F&B unicorns in Southeast Asia. And also the founder also used to be an entrepreneur previously. He used to run a B2C furniture startup. Yeah. So having operators in the tech scene that have already made it. Made it in a sense that obviously they have grown to a certain scale, and been able to build a company for the past 10 years. I think that stands out in the kind of advice that my partners can give to the next generation of entrepreneurs.

(13:20) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. How did you meet him?

(13:21) Fandy Cendrajaya:

So I met as mentioned earlier, I met Edward in 2016 when I just graduated from school. And then I thought eventually introduced me to James and eventually the past four years, three, four years when we started angel investing, since we started angel investing, we just got a lot closer and that's when we decided to build out this fund.

(13:39) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. How did you formulate the differentiation, right, of this one? Because it's not similar to many other funds, right? So, you're focusing again on the first check, minority investment, no follow on how you put together this thesis?

(13:50) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Because we realized that exit in Southeast Asia, the bigger it gets, obviously the more difficult it is. I think when we look at. If we own too much stake, like, let's say we own a 25% stake in a billion-dollar company, the only place that you can exit that position will be NASDAQ, right? I Don't think like the local public IPO in Indonesia can absorb that kind of exit. And obviously in the early, obviously in our previous investment experience, we entered quite early and we have managed to exit several positions quite quickly after that, because we believe that secondaries will happen in profit in cashflow positive companies, regardless of any market environment an example would be we invested in this beauty, right? Startup due to consumer brand and they were profitable at that time had to be convinced to actually even take our money And I think within six or seven months they receive offers again And obviously as a cash flow positive company that's growing By themselves, they wouldn't want too much dilution right in the primary round.

So that's when an exit event happened but then of course, if you have 10, 20, 30% equity in a company, you still probably can exit. Even though such events might happen, you can exit all your positions just because it will make the company look bad, right? Publicly wise, a big anchor investor is exiting. So that's where we come up with a smaller equity just because we want to be agile in terms of exit. Like that founder in particular, since they did not want to be too diluted, but then the next investor that's coming in, we thought that they will. They'll be really helpful to these guys. We thought, Hey, why not? Why not take our shares, right? We've already gotten some profits and we believe that with these guys on board, have their minimum equity requirement, they'll be able to take this company to the next level, which they did eventually.

(15:30) Jeremy Au:

I think it's really interesting because we're talking about two things, right? We're just like, we talked about the exits environment and that it's not great in Southeast Asia. And then secondly, what to do about it, right? Which is agility. Let's talk about the first one first. Like, why is it the exits are not so great? And I say this because I was chatting with a VC recently. And the VC was like, okay, the last thing I want to talk about in any public space is. The lack of exits in Southeast Asia. And I was like, yeah, I mean, that's like kind of the elephant in the room, right?

That's why everybody's asking the question now, at least in the private rooms in some of the public spaces. So, what do you think is happening from your perspective? And I'm happy to bounce with you as well.

(16:03) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I mean, in a public space, at least in Indonesia, there are not too many investors, retail investors in the public market, right? And that's why the market cap of the public market has not grown that much compared to the US public exchanges or other countries. I think people just obviously, I think a lot of startups have tried to solve this. They're not I think Indonesia has a lack of or lack of a better word, lack of access to financial literacy. And with all these up-and-coming stock investment platforms that are coming up, they have been helping a lot in terms of educating these first-time investors. But I don't think it's still enough of the lack of financial literacy.

(16:38) Jeremy Au:

I think that's also true, not just of Indonesia, right? But I think Singapore, Thailand, all the stock exchanges are also really small, frankly. So, it's not only an Indonesia thing, right? And I think the tricky part is that, it's hard to have a billion dollar listing, I think, on these platforms as well. And even if it's a smaller also, it's also pretty hard to get enough retail interest. So, I think the only one I can think of that two folks that have gone public that I think in the Indonesia Stock Exchange, right, which maybe seems somewhat viable, right? I think one is Gojek, GoTo, as well as Bukalapak. What do you think about that? Yeah.

(17:07) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Obviously the stock has gone down a lot, right? Unfortunately, but if there is an actual tech company, I would say like, go to is an actual tech company, right? They've made all our lives so much easier. I don't spend, there's not a day that goes by that I don't use Gojek, I think for me personally. I'm a big fan of the app. So if Gojek is not able to command such a high valuation what about other companies? They are sort of top of the pile, right? And I think in the Indonesia tech ecosystem, we'll go wherever Gojek will, GoTo will in the near future in order to, obviously, for the market to pick back up, GoTo has to actually rebound as well.

(17:40) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, it's not an easy market. I mean, I think Grab also had a relatively high listing on the US exchange.

(17:46) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I think that's quite different though. I think Grab one of the reasons why their stock is not as as strong as it's supposed to be, or that the value, of the price has dropped a lot was partly because crap obviously when public in the US. I don't think the US retail investors know too much about Southeast Asia. I do think that Grab would have a stronger IPO if it had happened in a Southeast Asia stock exchange.

(18:07) Jeremy Au:

Right. Yeah. Yeah, so it's interesting because right now I think Grab has about double the enterprise value right now in terms of valuation for then go to and then Sea group actually always tells people is actually double that of Grab. So you know a lot of people comparing grab and go to and I'm like yeah, Sea is the highest right so far.It'd be interesting to see but there are not that many other success stories on the exit market and like you said I think causes that dynamic right which is like. Okay, if there are a lot of exits, then there are not that many growth-stage investors, right? Series C, series D, series E. And then if so, that makes it hard for the series A folks, right? And the series B folks. And then that makes it hard for the seed folks as well as the pre-seed folks. So it's all going backward, right? So how do you think founders should be thinking about it if exits are not so great as a market?

(18:49) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Just be careful about the valuation. We talked about how in 2020, and 2021, we view post-money valuation as a success metric. We shouldn’t do that anymore. We should raise what we need at a conservative valuation as possible, just because of the exit landscape. We should work backward. If we feel that our company can go to $500 million, maybe the last round that you want to be raising private equity at, before eventually going public or whatever the case may be, is $100 million because the last investors have to have that upside.So, work backward, and pre-stage, I would always recommend people not to go above 10 million just because if you work backward, it will be quite difficult if you raise at 20 or 30.There have been success stories that you raise at 20, but you can still build into the valuation the next year. More often than not, the lower the valuation, the better it is for the founders and the dilution is kept at a minimum.

(19:46) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. I think that's really interesting to hear. And obviously, I think some founders will say like, okay, you know, Fandy and Jeremy, you're saying this because you're trying to get a big chunk of the valuation. You want a low valuation. So you have a big chunk of the company or so forth. Then how should we think about it from your perspective? I'm also happy to chime in my thoughts as well.

(20:02) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Right. So what I always tell founders is that, hey, look we can exit and we can follow on at least for Kopital, right? Well, at least we can exit if you don't do well, and we don't do follow on investments. The alignment of interest is actually the same as the founders as an early-stage investor. We're not trying to take more of your equity, but we need you to do really well for us to be able to have a secondary exit or for us to even go all the way with you and eventually have a public exit or get acquired. So entering and also in terms of our equity, we don't really take too much equity for us for it to even matter in the long run.

(20:35) Jeremy Au:

I think what's interesting is that from my perspective, the other way I would address that concern, and I think it's an honest concern, is exactly the way you said it. Maybe the only thing I'll say is like, Hey, we're not saying have a lower valuation just to have a low valuation, but we're also saying try to raise a small amount as possible and really focus on building the business, right? Because in that case, then you basically dilute yourself less, as well, you still have more control, right? And give yourself more upside over the medium to long term. I frankly, honestly, when I was a founder, I was terrible at this. I mean, I would be like, when I was a founder, I was like, I want a higher valuation.

(21:07) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Yup.

(21:08) Jeremy Au:

I don't know. That's how I negotiated. I don't know. Anyway, young and foolish on my side,

(21:12) Fandy Cendrajaya:

There’s, I mean, I will do that too. I guess if I was a founder.

(21:14) Jeremy Au:

It’s easy advice to give, but it's very hard. I think when I was there, it was just hard for me to do that. But I think what's interesting as a result, is that the reason why we're talking about this is as well, is that if you have a low valuation, you're able to bring on the right people to some extent, then within reason, of course, what you're trying to do is you try and give yourself as founder agility to exit which also gives you as Kopital, the agility to exit as well because you know, you're able to do those up round more carefully. Let's talk about it. So how do you feel about the strategy?

(21:42) Fandy Cendrajaya:

We are very excited about the strategy. Obviously, I think this is the perfect time for us to actually launch the strategy. Valuation has come down a lot. And there are founders with the right intentions are actually building businesses now. And also to add to your point, if you bring the right people on board on day one, you might not need that many fundraisers. Eventually, the goal here is to, as you mentioned, build a sustainable growing business. And when you're a sustainable growing business, there will always be buyers, regardless of which sector you're in. I think that has to be the goal in mind and a better time than today.

(22:11) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. from your perspective, I think what we saw, for example, there's an article that came out a few months ago, like if fishery had a recent transaction, and then some folks were able to sell secondary. So I mean, obviously the angels, some of them cashed out entirely some funds, they put 50% and sold it and they kept 50% going.

(22:28) Fandy Cendrajaya:

The way we think about it is, from a fund, my fund's perspective is we have to always put the LPs interest first, which is obviously, even if there's a lot of upside for me on the table, how many companies have gone on to a high valuation and have suddenly just stagnate there? A lot of them have, and it will be very prudent, at least for my end, as a fund manager to actually take some exits first whenever there's a chance, right? Because you never know what may happen in the future. That's what I always advise founders as well whenever there's a chance nobody's telling you to exit fully. But this is your company. You don't want to just make money off your salary. If you want to do that, you want to find something more stable. And the life as a founder is the opposite of a stable life. Instability every single day of your life. So there's a possibility of exiting, just like how I apply it to myself, I tell the founders, Hey, maybe you should take some money off the table.

(23:18) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. That's really important because equity doesn't let you pay the bills, feed your children, or buy a house. So all these are hard things to say, but it's the awkward reality of it as well. Any interesting quirks or things that you notice, now that you've done both the angel investing, but now you're doing it as a professional VC, any quirks or anything special about the Indonesian market that people should be thinking about?

(23:38) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Just that founders here come from a very different background. I think the founders that succeed here have a very specialized intention, and they know the market really well. Those are the founders who typically succeed. Where else? Obviously, I think in other markets, there are certain types of founders that come from a more polished background. I'll say that probably has an equal or higher chance of success. I think Indonesia is a market where you need to be very localized, the local network, local context. And you have to really be able to, I don't know how to put it, but I guess there's a certain intangible quality that you need in order to succeed in Indonesia.

(24:13) Jeremy Au:

Right. What's that intangible thing?

(24:13) Fandy Cendrajaya:

It's a very different record. I guess I'll mention this founder. The founder of a fit hub is very impressive to me, for example. We have a traditional business and then the founder has never really been in a consulting banking background, but clearly very business savvy, very commercial. And that's why the business has continued to grow over time, right? He had been able to adapt. He has been able to study the market, obviously become a sector expert in it, and also just looking at Kopi Kenangan same type of founder, very entrepreneurial at what has been in, at what has done businesses in multiple industries in the past, before starting at F&B, but have never actually worked as a consultant.

(24:50) Jeremy Au:

Sounds good. Could you share about a time that you personally have been brave?

(24:53) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I guess when I started angel investing and I'd say that that personally is a time that I took a step forward away from the safer traditional industry. Previously, working in a traditional industry, you sort of know what you're getting in every day. But I think it felt really exhilarating when I first made my first investments into a startup, scary yet exhilarating. So I guess that was the moment that I will describe as being brave, just because obviously that first investment set up the rest of the path for me to where I am at today. Hopefully just at the start of my investment journey, but have made me fall in love so much to investing in tech investment.

(25:28) Jeremy Au:

How have you matured as an investor since that first investment till today?

(25:32) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I guess just empathy and being candid to founders. I think honesty is very underrated in the current ecosystem that we have. I think a lot of people just see things that, and I was part of that as well. Just say things that people want to hear, but I think something that actually helps founders or other investors is just being completely honest all the time.

(25:51) Jeremy Au:

Why is it underrated? And why is it unpopular in Southeast Asia?

(25:55) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Grab some people the wrong way, but at the same time obviously the way you say it can be very flagrant but I do think there are certain ways of passing that message where if you're honest, you actually add value to that person. But then some people just want to, well, not some people, I think a lot of us, me included. Sometimes we just want to avoid that awkward moment of being candid.

(26:14) Jeremy Au:

What was interesting is that also you're an emerging fund manager, and investing in companies is different from being a fund manager and leader, right? I'm just kind of curious, how did you go about raising capital and learning the ropes?

(26:28) Fandy Cendrajaya:

I think I just went to the set of LPs that I feel I could add value in. Our LPs are mostly venture capitalists from the region, which are later investors than us. I just basically went about and told them that, hey, I can be your local partner in Indonesia and I'm not your competitor. I'm actually complimentary to you and let's work together. And hopefully, one of the companies that Kopital invests in can be invested by your company eventually, or you can come in together with us. I think that way we can make the ecosystem better together rather than me trying to go up against all the other VCs. I think it's very important for us to differentiate that we're a pre-seed. seed stage focus fund and we only want to do pre-seed, and seed stage, and our check size is actually up to 300K. So, even in the pre-seed round, typically, people raise above 500K, 500K to a million. So, if we only take 300K, there's a lot of room for collaboration and co-investments. So that's what I usually tell people who invest in our fund, Hey, you invest in us, and let's work together.

(27:24) Jeremy Au:

What was it like to pitch LPs?

(27:26) Fandy Cendrajaya:

It's daunting because I think I look up to a lot of them. Obviously, a lot of them are where I hope to be maybe in the future for early-stage investment and just, and I think all of them are probably smarter than me. So very difficult and scary, but I know that that's another part of being brave. You just have to jump in. You can't take one foot in and one foot out. You just have to jump in and just maybe do your thesis work.

(27:48) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And then let's see. Awesome. Looking forward to seeing how that pans out in the future as well. On that note, I'd love to kind of summarize the three big takeaways that grew from this conversation. First of all, thank you so much for sharing about Indonesia I think it was very interesting because we didn't just talk about Indonesia as a market, macros and everything's all sunshine, but also contrasting what we saw in 2020 versus where we are today in 2023, 2024, also looking at the founders, the mindset, the type of businesses, the qualities that we are trying to look out for. So I think there's a lot of interesting realities about it.

Secondly, thank you so much for sharing how you went about co-founding Kopital in terms of how you met your co-founder, how Kopi Kenangan plays a role as part of the structure and support and that work is there, but also how you went about fundraising capital to make it happen and how you came together with that niche and differentiation, right? So he's saying like, Hey, we're collaborating with you, not competing with you, but also we provide, for the founders a different set of outcomes and value add that you're able to provide.

Lastly, thank you so much for talking about exits in Southeast Asia. Not an easy conversation because a lot of people don't want to talk about it, and I think there's a big elephant in the room for the experts in the room. And we also talked very much about the fact that there haven't been many exits, but also the fact that the exits that we talked about also have linkages to IDX, the US Stock Exchanges. We talked about GoTo, Grab, Bukalapak, as well as Sea Group, right? So I thought it was an interesting set of conversations about the reality of it, and also what that means for founders who need to be thoughtful about how they want to intend and approach the exit, but also for funds that need it, agility, and how they exit as well. All in all, thank you so much for sharing your thoughts, Fandy.

(29:21) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Thank you for having me, Jeremy.

 

"Banyak orang yang sangat bearish sekarang dan banyak tesis investasi yang berubah. Apa yang sangat panas di tahun 2020 dan 2021 tidak sepanas sekarang. Bahkan perusahaan modal ventura saat ini lebih tenang. Dulu, kami sangat fokus pada apa pun yang dapat menghasilkan GMV yang besar karena, pada saat itu, tesisnya adalah GMV yang besar, ukuran pasar yang besar. Jika Anda mengkonversi sebagian kecil dari itu, akan ada perusahaan dengan pendapatan seratus atau 200 juta dolar, tetapi itu tidak terjadi saat ini. Banyak orang mencari sesuatu yang lebih nyata seperti pendapatan, dan bahkan tahap pre-seed melihat banyak perusahaan yang memiliki EBITDA positif, dan begitulah seharusnya karena ketika Anda berbicara tentang inovasi teknologi yang nyata, pertanyaan pertama adalah apakah talenta tersebut siap untuk membuat sesuatu yang berskala global. Ketika Anda berbicara tentang teknologi, itu harus bersifat global. Ketika saya melihat Indonesia, Indonesia adalah negara yang digerakkan oleh konsumen. Masuk akal jika banyak investasi yang masuk lebih didorong oleh konsumen, lebih banyak di bidang pertanian karena itulah kekayaan Indonesia. Dinamika pasar saat ini lebih berkelanjutan dalam jangka panjang." - Fandy Cendrajaya

 

"Berhati-hatilah dengan valuasi. Kami berbicara tentang bagaimana pada tahun 2020, dan 2021, kami memandang valuasi pasca-uang sebagai metrik keberhasilan. Kita seharusnya tidak melakukan itu lagi. Kita harus meningkatkan apa yang kita butuhkan dengan valuasi sekonservatif mungkin, hanya karena lanskap keluar. Kita harus bekerja mundur. Jika kita merasa bahwa perusahaan kita dapat mencapai $500 juta, mungkin putaran terakhir yang Anda inginkan untuk menggalang ekuitas swasta, sebelum akhirnya go public atau apa pun itu, adalah $100 juta karena investor terakhir harus mendapatkan keuntungan tersebut. jadi, bekerjalah secara mundur, dan pra-tahap, saya akan selalu merekomendasikan orang untuk tidak pergi di atas 10 juta hanya karena jika Anda bekerja secara mundur, akan sangat sulit jika Anda menggalang di usia 20 atau 30. Sudah ada kisah sukses yang Anda galang di usia 20 tahun, tetapi Anda masih bisa membangun penilaian di tahun berikutnya. Lebih sering daripada tidak, semakin rendah valuasi, semakin baik bagi para pendiri dan dilusi dijaga seminimal mungkin." - Fandy Cendrajaya

 

"Cara kami memikirkannya adalah kami harus selalu mengutamakan kepentingan LP. Bahkan jika ada banyak keuntungan bagi saya, berapa banyak perusahaan yang telah mencapai valuasi tinggi dan tiba-tiba stagnan di sana? Banyak dari mereka, dan akan sangat bijaksana, setidaknya bagi saya sebagai manajer investasi, untuk mengambil jalan keluar terlebih dahulu setiap kali ada kesempatan karena Anda tidak pernah tahu apa yang akan terjadi di masa depan. Itulah yang selalu saya sarankan kepada para pendiri. Tidak ada yang menyuruh Anda untuk keluar sepenuhnya, tetapi ini adalah perusahaan Anda. Anda tidak ingin hanya menghasilkan uang dari gaji Anda. Jika Anda ingin melakukan itu, Anda ingin mencari sesuatu yang lebih stabil, dan kehidupan seorang pendiri adalah kebalikan dari kehidupan yang stabil. Ada kemungkinan untuk keluar." - Fandy Cendrajaya

Dalam diskusi ini, Fandy Cendrajaya, Founding Partner Kopital Ventures, dan Jeremy Au membahas tiga tema utama:

1. Pasar Bear vs Pasar Bull Indonesia: Fandy berbicara tentang sentimen pasar Indonesia yang terus berkembang dari tahun 2020-2021 yang bullish ke sentimen investor yang lebih berhati-hati pada tahun 2022-2024. Ia berbagi tentang pentingnya bersikap realistis dalam membandingkan startup Indonesia dengan startup benchmark di pasar yang lebih besar seperti India, Tiongkok, dan Amerika Serikat. Ia juga menjelaskan nuansa ekosistem teknologi lokal di seluruh pertumbuhan berbasis komoditas, tren yang digerakkan oleh konsumen, dan persyaratan pelokalan.

2. Mendirikan Kopital Ventures: Fandy menjelaskan bagaimana ia membangun Kopital Ventures bersama rekan-rekannya yang memiliki visi yang sama dan keahlian yang saling melengkapi. Dia menjelaskan pendekatan penggalangan dana LP mereka dengan menekankan investasi seed-only tanpa pendanaan lanjutan, yang memungkinkan mereka untuk berkolaborasi dengan VC lainnya.

3. Jalan Keluar & Strategi Startup yang Sulit: Fandy menekankan kelangkaan peluang keluar yang signifikan bagi startup di Asia Tenggara, yang memengaruhi bagaimana VC harus berinvestasi dan memberi nasihat kepada perusahaan portofolio mereka. Ia berbicara tentang IPO dan kinerja saham perusahaan rintisan GoTo, Grab, dan Bukalapak di Bursa Efek Indonesia (BEI), dan bagaimana pendekatan pencatatan saham lokal ini berbeda dengan strategi IPO di Amerika Serikat. Ia menggarisbawahi mengapa para pendiri harus lebih bijaksana dan tangkas dalam strategi exit mereka, sehingga dapat menetapkan tolok ukur penilaian dan ekspektasi investor dengan lebih baik.

Jeremy dan Fandy juga membahas pentingnya melihat perbandingan valuasi perusahaan, nuansa angel investing, dan pentingnya empati dalam bekerja sama dengan para pendiri.

Didukung oleh Hive Health

Apakah Anda sedang melakukan ekspansi atau meluncurkan bisnis di Filipina? Memastikan kesehatan karyawan Anda adalah kunci untuk menarik dan mempertahankan talenta terbaik. Di situlah Hive Health hadir, terutama untuk perusahaan rintisan dan bisnis kecil hingga menengah. Mereka berspesialisasi dalam menyediakan rencana perawatan kesehatan berkualitas tinggi dan bebas gangguan yang disesuaikan dengan tempat kerja Anda. Pelajari lebih lanjut di www.ourhivehealth.com

(02:07) Jeremy Au:

Hai Fandy, sangat senang bisa menghadirkan Anda di acara ini. Saya masih ingat saat minum kopi yang enak itu. Dan kemudian pada awal Anda mulai meluncurkan dana dan sekarang Anda di sini dan semua orang seperti, Oh, apakah Anda pernah mendengar tentang Fandy? Dia melihat ini dan melihat itu. Saya seperti, oke, Anda harus tampil di podcast sekarang karena Anda sudah aktif dan berjalan. Jadi ya, silakan perkenalkan diri Anda.

(02:25) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Terima kasih, Jeremy, telah mengundang saya ke sini. Tentu saja, Anda ingat kopinya dan sangat menghargai bahwa SN dan Anda selalu sangat mendukung kami dan sangat kolaboratif. Jadi sedikit tentang latar belakang saya. Saya adalah mitra pendiri Kopital Ventures. Kopital Ventures adalah sebuah perusahaan pendanaan yang berfokus pada tahap awal. Kami berasal dari Asia Tenggara. Kami memiliki mandat di Asia Tenggara, tetapi kami memiliki fokus khusus di Indonesia, hanya karena di situlah latar belakang kami. Awalnya sebelum Kopital Ventures, saya juga menjalankan Kopital Network, sebuah jaringan angel informal yang terdiri dari para pendiri dan eksekutif dari perusahaan-perusahaan internet terkemuka di Indonesia. Bersama dengan anggota Kopital Network, dengan berbagai anggota, kami telah berinvestasi di lebih dari 30 perusahaan selama dua hingga tiga tahun terakhir. Saya sangat bangga untuk mengatakan bahwa semua perusahaan yang telah kami investasikan sejauh ini telah berhasil mengumpulkan pendanaan penuh dan kami telah berhasil mengamankan acara dan memiliki DPI sekitar 1,6, 1,7 dari investasi 3 tahun terakhir. Jadi, tentu saja, dengan hasil tersebut, saya dan mitra saya memutuskan untuk benar-benar pergi ke sana dan mengumpulkan modal eksternal untuk benar-benar berinvestasi di perusahaan tahap awal.

Kami merasa dengan pendanaan dibandingkan dengan menjadi angel investor, kami akan dapat menciptakan dampak yang lebih besar bagi para pendiri, karena kami dapat memiliki lebih banyak saham, kami dapat membuat segala sesuatunya lebih formal, dan kami memiliki lebih banyak sumber daya untuk membantu mereka. Jadi itulah sedikit tentang latar belakang profesional saya. Beberapa tahun sebelumnya, saya bekerja di industri tradisional. Saya adalah seorang pengusaha, yang tidak pernah mencapai kesuksesan seperti yang dimiliki oleh pengusaha lain yang ada di platform ini. Mengalami banyak kegagalan dan akhirnya, meskipun saya mengalami banyak kegagalan, saya berhasil menabung. Saat itulah saya memulai angel investing pada tahun 2020. Beruntung sekali bagi saya, saya bertemu dengan Edward dan James, pendiri Kopi Kenangan pada tahun 2016. Ketika saya pertama kali lulus dan kembali dari Amerika Serikat pada tahun 2020, salah satu alasan mengapa saya berhenti bekerja di industri tradisional adalah karena COVID datang, semuanya melambat. Pada saat itu, Kopi Kenangan juga sedang mencapai puncak popularitasnya. Jadi mereka, Edwin dan James juga sudah mulai matang sebagai pendiri dan mulai melakukan angel investing. Jadi saat itulah saya memutuskan untuk mulai berinvestasi bersama mereka. Mereka cukup baik hati untuk mengizinkan saya melakukan hal tersebut bersama-sama.

(Jeremy Au: Ya. Jadi, bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit tentang bagaimana Anda memulai angel investing, Anda adalah bagian dari jaringan telepon korporat, bukan? Jadi pada tahun 2020 sebelumnya, Kopitalas adalah sebuah dana yang muncul. Jadi bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang seperti apa pengalamannya?

(04:41) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Tentang investasi malaikat secara umum. Maksud saya, itu luar biasa, bukan? Ini adalah sesuatu yang sangat baru bagi saya pribadi, dan bertemu dengan banyak pendiri di tahap awal, terutama di masa-masa awal, saya sering berinvestasi di ekuitas publik. Jadi sebenarnya sebagian besar kesuksesan finansial saya berasal dari ekuitas publik, jika ada. Oleh karena itu, ketika saya pertama kali bertemu dengan para pendiri tahap awal yang meminta valuasi empat atau 5 juta, itu adalah kejutan budaya bagi saya. Bahkan ada yang langsung meminta valuasi dua digit. Saya tidak tahu bagaimana cara mengevaluasi perusahaan dan, pada tahap awal. Jadi, hal itu cukup mengejutkan.

Dan akhirnya, setelah mendengarkan beberapa presentasi, saya baru menyadari bahwa pasar saat itu sedang berada di puncaknya. Pada saat yang sama, kita tidak bisa melihat startup seperti cara kita melihat bisnis tradisional, meskipun valuasinya sangat konyol pada tahun 2020 dan 2021. Ada alasan mengapa valuasi mencapai jutaan dolar, bahkan pada tahap pre-seed, karena Anda jelas membutuhkan modal sebesar itu di masa-masa awal untuk benar-benar melakukan sesuatu dengannya, untuk menjalankannya. Untuk menemukan kecocokan pasar produk, untuk mendapatkan bukti konsep, untuk mendapatkan daya tarik. Jika tidak, tidak ada bisnis yang bisa Anda bangun karena setiap bisnis membutuhkan modal. Jadi itu adalah hal terbesar bagi saya, toko Altshare, dan juga betapa berbedanya setiap pendiri. Saya pikir itu adalah sesuatu yang berbeda. Banyak pendiri yang datang pada tahun 2020, dan 2021 dengan niat hanya untuk menggalang dana. Jadi banyak dari mereka yang menunjukkan kepada saya tabel perbandingan dari pasar lain, yang mungkin tidak berlaku di Indonesia, terutama seperti, jelas India, Cina, dan Amerika Serikat adalah pasar yang jauh lebih besar dan orang-orang di sana secara budaya sangat berbeda, bukan? Tapi di saat yang sama, ada hal yang saya pelajari juga, tapi tentu saja, ada beberapa pendiri yang masih, seperti, benar-benar baru memulai. Dengan niat yang benar, yaitu membangun sesuatu, mengidentifikasi masalah, dan mencoba memecahkan masalah tersebut dengan perusahaan mereka.

(06:24) Jeremy Au:

Ya, tahun 2020 adalah tahun yang sangat panas, bukan? Dan saya ingat, Indonesia sangat panas di tahun 2020. Jadi, begitu banyak perusahaan, begitu banyak pendiri, dan juga banyak valuasi yang naik cukup tinggi selama jangka waktu tersebut. Dan banyak orang juga mulai melakukan angel investing pada saat itu. Jadi itu, mungkin terlalu banyak waktu di rumah mungkin. Jadi, Anda tahu, saya kira, dari sudut pandang Anda, apa saja dinamika yang Anda lihat dari pasar Indonesia pada tahun 2020 dibandingkan dengan saat ini?

(06:50) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya rasa banyak orang yang sangat bearish sekarang, bukan? Banyak tesis investasi yang telah berubah. Apa yang sangat panas di tahun 2020, 2021 tidak sepanas hari ini. Dan. Bahkan perusahaan modal ventura pun lebih tenang saat ini, bukan? Dalam hal fokus sektor pada masa lalu, kami sangat fokus pada apa pun yang dapat menghasilkan GMV yang besar karena pada saat itu tesisnya jelas GMV yang besar, ukuran pasar yang besar. Jika Anda hanya mengkonversi sebagian kecil dari itu, akan ada perusahaan dengan pendapatan seratus atau 200 juta dolar, tetapi itu tidak terjadi.

Dan saat ini, banyak orang, termasuk saya sendiri, mencari sesuatu yang lebih nyata. Benar, kan? Seperti pendapatan dan bahkan seperti tahap pra-seed saat ini. Lihatlah banyak perusahaan yang memiliki EBITDA positif, dan menurut saya itu bagus, bukan? Saya pikir memang seharusnya begitu. Karena ketika Anda berbicara tentang inovasi nyata, inovasi teknologi, pertanyaan pertama adalah apakah talenta-talenta yang ada sudah siap untuk membuat sesuatu yang berskala global? Karena ketika Anda berbicara tentang teknologi, itu harus global. Kami tidak menggunakan, misalnya. Microsoft yang dibuat di Indonesia, bukan? Kami menggunakan Microsoft. Itu sudah pasti Microsoft. Banyak perangkat lunak yang, kapan pun Anda membuat label, harus berskala global.

Jadi ketika kita, ketika saya melihat Indonesia, Indonesia adalah negara yang digerakkan oleh komoditas, negara yang digerakkan oleh konsumen, sangat konsumtif. Jadi masuk akal jika banyak investasi saat ini yang lebih didorong oleh konsumen lebih banyak di bidang pertanian, karena di situlah kekayaan Indonesia. Jadi, menurut saya koreksi pasar, dinamika pasar saat ini adalah bukti bahwa pasar lebih berkelanjutan dalam jangka panjang.

(08:12) Jeremy Au:

Dan juga Anda, Anda menyebutkan bahwa, Anda tahu, para pendiri pada saat itu sangat banyak menggunakan pembanding, bukan? Jadi pembanding global dan fokus pada penggalangan dana. Apakah menurut Anda sentimen tersebut telah berubah di antara para pendiri saat ini?

(08:23) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya rasa beberapa pendiri masih melakukan hal tersebut. Maksud saya, memang benar. Pembanding memang masuk akal untuk beberapa sektor, bukan? Namun untuk sebagian besar, bagi saya pribadi, saya tidak terlalu, saya pikir itu adalah hal terakhir yang saya lihat hanya karena saya sendiri pernah menjadi pengusaha, pengusaha kecil, dan saya sangat, saya cukup realistis, bukan? Pembanding tersebut adalah semacam di mana Anda berharap untuk berada di pasar semacam itu. Jadi mungkin tidak bisa diterapkan untuk konteks lokal. Tapi kemudian saya pikir banyak pendiri, biasanya yang belum pernah menjadi operator cenderung lebih sering menggunakannya. Ya.

(08:55) Jeremy Au:

Ya, bagaimana seharusnya seorang pendiri menggunakannya? Maksud saya, tentu saja, itu masuk akal. Saya pernah melakukan itu sebelumnya ketika saya masih menjadi penggalang dana. Maksud saya, saya akan mengatakan ini adalah pembanding di Amerika Serikat. Tentu saja, pada saat itu saya sedang membangun sebuah perusahaan di Amerika Serikat, bukan? Jadi saya membandingkannya dengan

(09:06) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Ini jauh berbeda.

(09:08) Jeremy Au:

Ini seperti tidak terlalu buruk, bukan? Hei, ketika Boston, New York, ini adalah SF, tapi tentu saja sekarang sudah seperti Singapura, Indonesia, entahlah, Hong Kong, Cina, tolok ukur global. Benar. Tapi menurut Anda, bagaimana seharusnya orang-orang membicarakan hal itu? Saya kira.

(09:20) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Hanya dalam hal cara kerjanya di pasar tertentu, benar, konteks tertentu itu sangat berbeda. Jadi, itu adalah sesuatu yang harus benar-benar diperjelas. Saya pikir, misalnya, bagaimana cara kerjanya di India, bagaimana cara kerjanya di Amerika Serikat, bagaimana cara kerjanya di Cina. Banyak, misalnya, banyak orang yang membangun perdagangan sosial. Jelas, di Cina, Pinduoduo dan lainnya telah sukses besar. Dan ketika Anda menerapkannya di Indonesia, sejauh ini belum ada yang berhasil untuk kategori tertentu, bukan? Jadi jelas tidak terlalu bisa diterapkan. Tapi di saat yang sama, apakah itu berarti social commerce adalah model bisnis yang buruk? Tidak, menurut saya tidak. Menurut saya, ini hanya tergantung pada kategori yang Anda masuki. Jadi, Anda harus menerapkannya, bukannya seperti, hei, Pintoto berhasil di sini. Itu harus bekerja di Indonesia.

(09:56) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya pasti pernah mendengarnya.

(09:57) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Ya. Metode X. Seperti, perdagangan cepat pada tahun 2021.

(10:02) Jeremy Au:

Oh, panas sekali, 2021.

(10:03) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Benar, kan? Ya.

(10:04) Jeremy Au:

Saat itu sangat panas. Saya juga selalu merasa bingung.

(10:06) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Maksud saya, pada saat itu, itu seperti gorila, dan saya pikir ada satu lagi, bukan? Ada yang bernilai miliaran dolar, jadi sekarang Zepto, tentu saja, baru-baru ini masih mengumpulkan modal dalam jumlah besar. Jadi saya pikir banyak investor, termasuk saya, berinvestasi dalam perdagangan cepat saat itu. Saat itu sangat sibuk. Itu hanya berdasarkan perbandingan, bukan? Saya rasa tidak ada yang bisa mengatakan sebaliknya.

(10:26) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Dan saya rasa bagian yang sulit, seperti yang Anda katakan, adalah Anda melakukannya dengan pembanding, tapi kemudian dengan analogi, bukan? Namun, jika pasar Anda adalah Amerika Serikat, tingkat satu, dan kemudian seperti kota tingkat satu, seperti SF atau New York, maka Anda bisa melihat PDB per kapita. Anda masuk ke desain perkotaan, dan kekuatan pasar lokal bisa sangat berbeda. Ya, orang-orang QuickCommerce benar-benar kesulitan karena ternyata nilai keranjangnya sangat berbeda, bukan? Cukup sulit untuk menghasilkan uang jika Anda, memindahkan sekantong beras, Anda tahu, jadi, Anda tahu, itu sangat berat, sangat besar, dan itu adalah satu kantong beras. Itu tidak bisa menghasilkan uang. Setidaknya Anda bisa menagih ke pelanggan, bukan? (11:02)

(11:02) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Ya. Dan sayangnya, sebenarnya, untuk menambahkan hal itu, saya pikir termasuk saya sendiri, melihat perbandingannya, saya hanya, pada saat itu, tidak melihat hal-hal terlalu dalam, hanya berpikir bahwa itu akan berhasil juga, bukan? Mungkin itu masih bisa berhasil, tidak pernah mengatakan tidak pernah, saya kira, tapi jelas, seperti yang Anda sebutkan, orang-orang mengalami kesulitan. Dan ketika ada pembanding tersebut, ketika Anda terlalu fokus pada hal itu, Anda cenderung menjadi bias, terlepas dari jumlah riset yang Anda lakukan. Anda hanya akan mengatakan, Oh, ini berhasil di pasar ini. Lihatlah jumlah dana yang mereka kumpulkan. Mungkin bisa berhasil di pasar kita juga.

Jadi saya pikir di situlah bagi saya pribadi, saya telah belajar untuk melihat pembanding dan mulai mengabaikannya hanya karena ia bekerja di sana, bukan berarti agar saya tidak menjadi terlalu bias dalam hal bagaimana saya mengulas sebuah perusahaan dan sektor ini.

(11:41) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya rasa salah satu versi yang saya lihat berhasil. Maksud saya, saya tidak mengatakan bahwa ini adalah kesuksesan yang hebat, besar, Anda tahu, breakout, tetapi saya melihat bahwa satu kategori produk yang cocok untuk perdagangan cepat adalah seperti rokok dan vape karena nilainya tinggi. Ukurannya kecil. Mudah dibawa-bawa. Dan ketika orang menginginkannya sekarang. Jadi, cukup menarik untuk melihat bahwa beberapa produk dapat masuk ke dalam rantai nilai tersebut dalam arti itu juga.

Yang menarik adalah, tentu saja, bagi Anda sendiri, Kopital, Anda membangunnya dengan tesis investasi yang berfokus pada para pendiri tahap awal. Bisakah Anda ceritakan sedikit tentang hal-hal apa saja yang membedakan Kopital dengan VC fund lainnya?

(12:12) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya rasa hal yang membedakan Kopital adalah saya selalu mengatakan hal ini kepada orang-orang, kami bukan perusahaan dengan nilai tambah. Kami mencoba untuk, ya, kami tidak, kami mencoba untuk tidak terlalu banyak berjanji dan saya rasa ekuitas kami akan mencerminkan bahwa kami tidak mencari ekuitas dua digit. Kami mencari 3 sampai 4, maksimal 3 sampai 7%, karena itu mudah-mudahan mencerminkan jumlah pekerjaan yang akan kami lakukan dan kami tidak melakukan double down dalam hal berinvestasi di putaran berikutnya atau putaran lanjutan, karena kami tidak ingin memberikan sinyal buruk kepada perusahaan yang tidak kami investasikan, karena jika Anda melakukan double down secara otomatis Anda akan lebih fokus dalam membantu perusahaan tersebut dibandingkan dengan perusahaan lain karena Anda memiliki lebih banyak saham. Hal itu mungkin akan mengembalikan dana Anda, atau setidaknya Anda berharap itu akan terjadi. Jadi itulah perbedaannya. Dan juga mitra saya.

Jadi partner saya adalah pendiri Kopi Kenangan. Salah satu unicorn F&B pertama di Asia Tenggara. Dan pendirinya juga dulunya adalah seorang pengusaha. Dia dulu menjalankan startup furnitur B2C. Ya. Jadi memiliki operator di dunia teknologi yang sudah berhasil. Berhasil dalam artian mereka telah berkembang ke skala tertentu, dan mampu membangun perusahaan selama 10 tahun terakhir. Saya rasa hal itu menonjol dalam jenis nasihat yang dapat diberikan oleh mitra saya kepada generasi pengusaha berikutnya.

(13:20) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Bagaimana kau bertemu dengannya?

(13:21) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Jadi saya bertemu seperti yang saya sebutkan sebelumnya, saya bertemu Edward pada tahun 2016 ketika saya baru saja lulus sekolah. Dan kemudian saya pikir akhirnya memperkenalkan saya kepada James dan akhirnya empat tahun terakhir, tiga, empat tahun ketika kami memulai angel investing, sejak kami memulai angel investing, kami menjadi lebih dekat dan saat itulah kami memutuskan untuk membangun dana ini.

(13:39) Jeremy Au:

Ya, bagaimana Anda merumuskan diferensiasi dari reksa dana yang satu ini? Karena ini tidak sama dengan reksa dana yang lain kan? Jadi, Anda kembali fokus pada cek pertama, investasi minoritas, tidak ada kelanjutan bagaimana Anda menyusun tesis ini?

(13:50) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Karena kami menyadari bahwa jalan keluar di Asia Tenggara, semakin besar, jelas semakin sulit. Saya pikir ketika kita melihat. Jika kita memiliki terlalu banyak saham, misalnya kita memiliki 25% saham di perusahaan bernilai miliaran dolar, satu-satunya tempat untuk keluar dari posisi tersebut adalah NASDAQ, bukan? Saya rasa IPO publik lokal di Indonesia tidak dapat menyerap dana keluar seperti itu. Dan jelas di awal, jelas dalam pengalaman investasi kami sebelumnya, kami masuk cukup awal dan kami telah berhasil keluar dari beberapa posisi dengan cukup cepat setelah itu, karena kami percaya bahwa secondary akan terjadi pada perusahaan yang memiliki arus kas yang positif, terlepas dari lingkungan pasar apa pun, contohnya adalah kami berinvestasi di perusahaan ini, bukan? Startup karena merek konsumen dan mereka menguntungkan pada saat itu harus diyakinkan untuk benar-benar mengambil uang kami dan saya pikir dalam waktu enam atau tujuh bulan mereka menerima tawaran lagi dan jelas sebagai perusahaan arus kas positif yang tumbuh dengan sendirinya, mereka tidak akan menginginkan terlalu banyak pengenceran di putaran utama.

Jadi, saat itulah peristiwa keluar terjadi, tetapi tentu saja, jika Anda memiliki 10, 20, 30% ekuitas di sebuah perusahaan, Anda masih bisa keluar. Meskipun peristiwa seperti itu mungkin terjadi, Anda dapat keluar dari semua posisi Anda hanya karena itu akan membuat perusahaan terlihat buruk, bukan? Secara publik, investor besar akan keluar. Jadi di situlah kami membuat ekuitas yang lebih kecil hanya karena kami ingin gesit dalam hal keluar. Seperti pendiri tadi, karena mereka tidak ingin terlalu terdilusi, tapi kemudian investor berikutnya yang masuk, kami pikir mereka akan melakukannya. Mereka akan sangat membantu orang-orang ini. Kami berpikir, Hei, mengapa tidak? Mengapa tidak mengambil saham kami, bukan? Kami telah mendapatkan beberapa keuntungan dan kami percaya bahwa dengan adanya orang-orang ini, dengan persyaratan ekuitas minimum mereka, mereka akan dapat membawa perusahaan ini ke tingkat berikutnya, dan akhirnya mereka berhasil.

(15:30) Jeremy Au:

Saya pikir ini sangat menarik karena kita berbicara tentang dua hal, bukan? Kita berbicara tentang lingkungan yang ada dan bahwa hal ini tidak bagus di Asia Tenggara. Dan yang kedua, apa yang harus dilakukan untuk mengatasinya, bukan? Yaitu kelincahan. Mari kita bahas yang pertama terlebih dahulu. Seperti, mengapa pintu keluarnya tidak begitu bagus? Dan saya mengatakan ini karena saya mengobrol dengan seorang VC baru-baru ini. Dan VC tersebut berkata, oke, hal terakhir yang ingin saya bicarakan di ruang publik adalah. Kurangnya jalan keluar di Asia Tenggara. Dan saya seperti, ya, maksud saya, itu seperti gajah di dalam ruangan, bukan?

Itulah mengapa semua orang mengajukan pertanyaan sekarang, setidaknya di ruang-ruang pribadi di beberapa ruang publik. Jadi, menurut Anda apa yang sedang terjadi dari sudut pandang Anda? Dan saya juga senang untuk berbagi dengan Anda.

(16:03) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Maksud saya, di ruang publik, setidaknya di Indonesia, tidak terlalu banyak investor, investor ritel di pasar publik, bukan? Dan itulah mengapa kapitalisasi pasar di pasar publik tidak terlalu berkembang dibandingkan dengan bursa saham di Amerika Serikat atau negara lain. Saya rasa orang-orang jelas, saya rasa banyak startup yang mencoba memecahkan masalah ini. Saya rasa Indonesia memiliki kekurangan, atau dengan kata yang lebih baik, kurangnya akses terhadap literasi keuangan. Dan dengan banyaknya platform investasi saham yang sedang naik daun, mereka telah banyak membantu dalam hal mengedukasi para investor pemula. Namun, menurut saya, kurangnya literasi keuangan masih belum cukup.

(16:38) Jeremy Au:

Saya rasa itu juga benar, bukan hanya di Indonesia, bukan? Tapi saya rasa Singapura, Thailand, semua bursa sahamnya juga sangat kecil, jujur saja. Jadi, ini bukan hanya masalah Indonesia, bukan? Dan menurut saya bagian yang sulit adalah, sulit untuk memiliki pencatatan saham bernilai miliaran dolar, menurut saya, di platform-platform ini juga. Dan bahkan jika nilainya lebih kecil, juga cukup sulit untuk mendapatkan minat ritel yang cukup. Jadi, saya pikir satu-satunya yang bisa saya pikirkan adalah dua orang yang sudah go public yang menurut saya ada di Bursa Efek Indonesia, kan, yang mungkin terlihat cukup layak, bukan? Menurut saya, salah satunya adalah Gojek, GoTo, dan juga Bukalapak. Bagaimana pendapat Anda tentang itu? Ya.

(17:07) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Jelas sahamnya sudah turun banyak, bukan? Sayangnya, tetapi jika ada perusahaan teknologi yang sebenarnya, saya akan mengatakan seperti, pergilah ke perusahaan teknologi yang sebenarnya, bukan? Mereka telah membuat hidup kita jauh lebih mudah. Saya tidak menghabiskan waktu, tidak ada satu hari pun yang saya lewatkan tanpa menggunakan Gojek, menurut saya pribadi. Saya adalah penggemar berat aplikasi ini. Jadi, jika Gojek tidak dapat memiliki valuasi yang tinggi, bagaimana dengan perusahaan lain? Mereka berada di posisi teratas, bukan? Dan saya rasa di ekosistem teknologi Indonesia, kita akan pergi ke mana pun Gojek akan pergi, GoTo akan pergi dalam waktu dekat untuk, tentu saja, agar pasar bisa bangkit kembali, GoTo juga harus bangkit kembali.

(17:40) Jeremy Au:

Ya, ini bukan pasar yang mudah. Maksud saya, saya rasa Grab juga memiliki daftar saham yang relatif tinggi di bursa AS.

(17:46) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya rasa hal ini cukup berbeda. Saya rasa salah satu alasan mengapa saham Grab tidak sekuat yang seharusnya, atau nilainya turun drastis, adalah karena omong kosong yang jelas-jelas terjadi di AS. Saya rasa investor ritel AS tidak tahu banyak tentang Asia Tenggara. Saya rasa Grab akan memiliki IPO yang lebih kuat jika dilakukan di bursa saham Asia Tenggara.

(18:07) Jeremy Au:

Benar. Ya. Ya, jadi ini menarik karena saat ini saya pikir Grab memiliki sekitar dua kali lipat nilai perusahaan saat ini dalam hal valuasi untuk Go-Jek dan kemudian grup Sea sebenarnya selalu mengatakan kepada orang-orang bahwa sebenarnya dua kali lipat dari Grab. Jadi, Anda tahu banyak orang yang membandingkan Grab dan Go-Jek dan saya seperti, ya, Sea adalah yang tertinggi sejauh ini, akan menarik untuk dilihat tetapi tidak banyak kisah sukses lainnya di pasar yang keluar dan seperti yang Anda katakan, saya pikir itu menyebabkan dinamika itu, yang mana. Oke, jika ada banyak exit, maka tidak banyak investor yang berada di tahap pertumbuhan, bukan? Seri C, seri D, seri E. Dan jika demikian, itu menyulitkan orang-orang seri A, kan? Dan orang-orang seri B. Dan kemudian itu menyulitkan orang-orang seed serta orang-orang pra-seed. Jadi semuanya berjalan mundur, bukan? Jadi, menurut Anda, bagaimana para pendiri harus memikirkannya jika jalan keluarnya tidak sebesar pasar?

(18:49) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Berhati-hatilah dengan valuasi. Kami berbicara tentang bagaimana pada tahun 2020, dan 2021, kami memandang valuasi pasca-uang sebagai metrik keberhasilan. Kita seharusnya tidak melakukan itu lagi. Kita harus meningkatkan apa yang kita butuhkan dengan valuasi sekonservatif mungkin, hanya karena lanskap keluar. Kita harus bekerja mundur. Jika kita merasa bahwa perusahaan kita dapat mencapai $500 juta, mungkin putaran terakhir yang Anda inginkan untuk menggalang ekuitas swasta, sebelum akhirnya go public atau apa pun itu, adalah $100 juta karena investor terakhir harus mendapatkan keuntungan tersebut. jadi, bekerjalah secara mundur, dan pra-tahap, saya akan selalu merekomendasikan orang untuk tidak pergi di atas 10 juta hanya karena jika Anda bekerja secara mundur, akan sangat sulit jika Anda menggalang di usia 20 atau 30. Sudah ada kisah sukses yang Anda galang di usia 20 tahun, tetapi Anda masih bisa membangun penilaian di tahun berikutnya. Lebih sering daripada tidak, semakin rendah valuasi, semakin baik bagi para pendiri dan pengenceran dijaga seminimal mungkin.

(19:46) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya rasa itu sangat menarik untuk didengar. Dan jelas, saya rasa beberapa pendiri akan berkata, oke, Anda tahu, Fandy dan Jeremy, Anda mengatakan hal ini karena Anda mencoba untuk mendapatkan nilai valuasi yang besar. Anda menginginkan valuasi yang rendah. Jadi Anda memiliki sebagian besar perusahaan atau sebagainya. Lalu bagaimana kita harus memikirkannya dari sudut pandang Anda? Saya juga senang untuk menyumbangkan pemikiran saya.

(20:02) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Benar. Jadi yang selalu saya katakan kepada para pendiri adalah, hei, lihat, kita bisa keluar dan kita bisa mengikuti setidaknya untuk Kopital, bukan? Ya, setidaknya kita bisa keluar jika kamu tidak berhasil, dan kita tidak melakukan investasi lanjutan. Penyelarasan kepentingannya sebenarnya sama dengan para pendiri sebagai investor tahap awal. Kami tidak berusaha mengambil lebih banyak ekuitas Anda, tetapi kami ingin Anda bekerja dengan sangat baik agar kami dapat memiliki secondary exit atau bahkan kami dapat terus bersama Anda dan pada akhirnya melakukan penawaran umum atau diakuisisi. Jadi, saat masuk dan juga dalam hal ekuitas kami, kami tidak mengambil terlalu banyak ekuitas untuk kami agar bisa menjadi masalah dalam jangka panjang.

(20:35) Jeremy Au:

Menurut saya, yang menarik adalah dari sudut pandang saya, cara lain yang akan saya lakukan untuk mengatasi kekhawatiran itu, dan saya pikir itu adalah kekhawatiran yang jujur, persis seperti yang Anda katakan. Mungkin satu-satunya hal yang akan saya katakan adalah, Hei, kami tidak mengatakan memiliki valuasi yang lebih rendah hanya untuk mendapatkan valuasi yang rendah, tetapi kami juga mengatakan cobalah untuk mengumpulkan dana sekecil mungkin dan benar-benar fokus untuk membangun bisnis, bukan? Karena dalam hal ini, pada dasarnya Anda pada dasarnya tidak terlalu mencairkan diri Anda sendiri, dan Anda juga masih memiliki kontrol yang lebih besar, bukan? Dan memberi diri Anda lebih banyak keuntungan dalam jangka menengah dan panjang. Terus terang saja, ketika saya masih menjadi seorang pendiri, saya sangat buruk dalam hal ini. Maksud saya, ketika saya masih menjadi seorang pendiri, saya ingin valuasi yang lebih tinggi.

(21:07) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Yup.

(21:08) Jeremy Au:

Aku tidak tahu. Begitulah caraku bernegosiasi. Aku tidak tahu. Pokoknya, muda dan bodoh di pihakku,

(21:12) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Ada, maksud saya, saya juga akan melakukannya. Saya kira jika saya adalah seorang pendiri.

(21:14) Jeremy Au:

Ini adalah saran yang mudah untuk diberikan, tetapi sangat sulit. Saya rasa ketika saya berada di sana, sulit bagi saya untuk melakukannya. Namun saya pikir apa yang menarik sebagai hasilnya, adalah alasan mengapa kita membicarakan hal ini juga, adalah bahwa jika Anda memiliki valuasi yang rendah, Anda dapat membawa orang-orang yang tepat sampai batas tertentu, maka dengan alasan yang masuk akal, tentu saja, apa yang Anda coba lakukan adalah mencoba dan memberikan diri Anda sebagai pendiri kelincahan untuk keluar yang juga memberi Anda sebagai Kopital, kelincahan untuk keluar juga karena Anda tahu, Anda bisa melakukannya dengan lebih hati-hati. Mari kita bahas tentang itu. Jadi bagaimana pendapat Anda tentang strategi ini?

(21:42) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Kami sangat bersemangat dengan strategi ini. Jelas, saya pikir ini adalah waktu yang tepat bagi kami untuk meluncurkan strategi tersebut. Valuasi telah turun banyak. Dan ada beberapa pendiri dengan niat yang tepat yang sedang membangun bisnis sekarang. Dan juga untuk menambahkan poin Anda, jika Anda membawa orang yang tepat pada hari pertama, Anda mungkin tidak memerlukan banyak penggalangan dana. Pada akhirnya, tujuannya di sini adalah, seperti yang Anda sebutkan, membangun bisnis yang berkembang secara berkelanjutan. Dan ketika Anda adalah sebuah bisnis yang berkembang secara berkelanjutan, akan selalu ada pembeli, terlepas dari sektor apa pun yang Anda geluti. Saya rasa itulah yang harus menjadi tujuan utama dan waktu yang lebih baik daripada hari ini.

(22:11) Jeremy Au:

Ya. dari sudut pandang Anda, saya pikir apa yang kita lihat, misalnya, ada artikel yang keluar beberapa bulan yang lalu, seperti jika perikanan memiliki transaksi baru-baru ini, dan kemudian beberapa orang dapat menjual sekunder. Jadi maksud saya, jelas para malaikat, beberapa dari mereka mencairkan seluruh dana, mereka menaruh 50% dan menjualnya dan mereka tetap menyimpan 50%.

(22:28) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Cara kami memikirkannya adalah, dari sudut pandang dana, perspektif dana saya adalah kami harus selalu mengutamakan kepentingan LP, yang jelas, bahkan jika ada banyak keuntungan bagi saya, berapa banyak perusahaan yang telah mencapai valuasi yang tinggi dan tiba-tiba stagnan di sana? Banyak sekali, dan akan sangat bijaksana, setidaknya bagi saya, sebagai manajer investasi untuk mengambil jalan keluar terlebih dahulu setiap kali ada kesempatan, bukan? Karena Anda tidak akan pernah tahu apa yang akan terjadi di masa depan. Itulah yang selalu saya sarankan kepada para pendiri, kapan pun ada kesempatan, tidak ada yang menyuruh Anda untuk keluar sepenuhnya. Tapi ini adalah perusahaan Anda. Anda tidak ingin hanya menghasilkan uang dari gaji Anda. Jika Anda ingin melakukan itu, Anda harus mencari sesuatu yang lebih stabil. Dan kehidupan sebagai pendiri adalah kebalikan dari kehidupan yang stabil. Ketidakstabilan setiap hari dalam hidup Anda. Jadi ada kemungkinan untuk keluar, seperti yang saya terapkan pada diri saya sendiri, saya mengatakan kepada para pendiri, Hei, mungkin Anda harus mengambil sejumlah uang dari meja.

(23:18) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Hal ini sangat penting karena ekuitas tidak memungkinkan Anda untuk membayar tagihan, memberi makan anak, atau membeli rumah. Jadi semua ini adalah hal yang sulit untuk dikatakan, tetapi ini adalah kenyataan yang tidak menyenangkan. Adakah kebiasaan atau hal menarik yang Anda perhatikan, setelah Anda melakukan angel investing dan sekarang Anda melakukannya sebagai VC profesional, adakah kebiasaan atau sesuatu yang spesial tentang pasar Indonesia yang harus dipikirkan oleh orang-orang?

(23:38) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Hanya saja, para pendiri di sini berasal dari latar belakang yang sangat berbeda. Menurut saya, para pendiri yang berhasil di sini memiliki niat yang sangat khusus, dan mereka mengetahui pasar dengan sangat baik. Mereka adalah para pendiri yang biasanya berhasil. Di mana lagi? Tentu saja, saya pikir di pasar lain, ada beberapa jenis pendiri yang berasal dari latar belakang yang lebih baik. Saya akan mengatakan bahwa mereka mungkin memiliki peluang yang sama atau lebih tinggi untuk sukses. Menurut saya, Indonesia adalah pasar di mana Anda harus sangat terlokalisasi, jaringan lokal, konteks lokal. Dan Anda harus benar-benar mampu, saya tidak tahu bagaimana cara mengatakannya, tapi saya rasa ada kualitas tak berwujud yang Anda butuhkan untuk bisa sukses di Indonesia.

(24:13) Jeremy Au:

Benar. Apakah hal tak berwujud itu?

(24:13) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Ini adalah catatan yang sangat berbeda. Saya rasa saya akan menyebutkan pendiri ini. Pendiri fit hub sangat mengesankan bagi saya, misalnya. Kami memiliki bisnis tradisional dan pendirinya tidak pernah memiliki latar belakang konsultan perbankan, namun jelas sangat paham bisnis, sangat komersial. Dan itulah mengapa bisnis ini terus berkembang dari waktu ke waktu, bukan? Dia telah mampu beradaptasi. Dia telah mampu mempelajari pasar, jelas menjadi ahli di bidangnya, dan juga melihat Kopi Kenangan dengan tipe pendiri yang sama, sangat berjiwa wirausaha dalam hal apa yang telah ia lakukan, dalam hal apa yang telah ia lakukan di berbagai industri di masa lalu, sebelum memulai di F&B, tetapi tidak pernah benar-benar bekerja sebagai konsultan.

(24:50) Jeremy Au:

Kedengarannya bagus. Bisakah Anda berbagi tentang saat-saat Anda secara pribadi menjadi berani?

(24:53) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya kira ketika saya memulai angel investing dan saya akan mengatakan bahwa itu secara pribadi adalah saat dimana saya mengambil langkah maju dari industri tradisional yang lebih aman. Sebelumnya, bekerja di industri tradisional, Anda sudah tahu apa yang akan Anda dapatkan setiap hari. Tapi saya rasa rasanya sangat menggembirakan ketika saya pertama kali melakukan investasi pertama saya ke dalam sebuah startup, menakutkan sekaligus menggembirakan. Jadi saya rasa itu adalah momen yang akan saya gambarkan sebagai momen yang berani, karena jelas investasi pertama itu membuka jalan bagi saya untuk mencapai posisi saya sekarang. Semoga hanya di awal perjalanan investasi saya, tetapi telah membuat saya jatuh cinta pada investasi teknologi.

(25:28) Jeremy Au:

Bagaimana Anda menjadi lebih dewasa sebagai investor sejak investasi pertama hingga hari ini?

(25:32) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya rasa hanya empati dan jujur kepada para pendiri. Saya rasa kejujuran sangat diremehkan dalam ekosistem yang kita miliki saat ini. Saya rasa banyak orang yang hanya melihat hal-hal seperti itu, dan saya juga merupakan bagian dari itu. Katakan saja hal-hal yang ingin didengar orang, tetapi saya pikir sesuatu yang benar-benar membantu para pendiri atau investor lain adalah dengan selalu jujur.

(25:51) Jeremy Au:

Mengapa hal ini diremehkan? Dan mengapa tidak populer di Asia Tenggara?

(25:55) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Mengambil hati beberapa orang dengan cara yang salah, namun di saat yang sama jelas cara Anda mengatakannya bisa jadi sangat mencolok, namun menurut saya ada beberapa cara tertentu untuk menyampaikan pesan tersebut, di mana jika Anda jujur, Anda benar-benar memberikan nilai tambah bagi orang tersebut. Namun, beberapa orang hanya ingin, ya, tidak semua orang, saya pikir banyak dari kita, termasuk saya. Terkadang kita hanya ingin menghindari momen canggung untuk berterus terang.

(26:14) Jeremy Au:

Yang menarik adalah bahwa Anda juga merupakan seorang fund manager baru, dan berinvestasi di perusahaan-perusahaan berbeda dengan menjadi fund manager dan pemimpin, bukan? Saya hanya ingin tahu, bagaimana Anda mengumpulkan modal dan mempelajari seluk beluknya?

(26:28) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Saya pikir saya hanya pergi ke kumpulan LP yang saya rasa bisa memberikan nilai tambah. LP kami sebagian besar adalah pemodal ventura dari kawasan ini, yang merupakan investor yang lebih tua dari kami. Saya hanya pergi dan mengatakan kepada mereka bahwa, hei, saya bisa menjadi mitra lokal Anda di Indonesia dan saya bukan pesaing Anda. Saya benar-benar memuji Anda dan mari kita bekerja sama. Dan mudah-mudahan, salah satu perusahaan yang diinvestasikan oleh Kopital dapat diinvestasikan oleh perusahaan Anda pada akhirnya, atau Anda dapat masuk bersama kami. Saya pikir dengan begitu kita bisa membuat ekosistem menjadi lebih baik bersama-sama, daripada saya mencoba melawan semua VC lainnya. Saya pikir sangat penting bagi kami untuk membedakan bahwa kami adalah pre-seed, seed stage focus fund dan kami hanya ingin melakukan pre-seed, dan seed stage, dan ukuran cek kami sebenarnya hingga 300 ribu. Jadi, bahkan di putaran pre-seed, biasanya orang-orang mengumpulkan dana di atas 500 ribu, 500 ribu hingga satu juta. Jadi, jika kami hanya mengambil 300 ribu, ada banyak ruang untuk kolaborasi dan investasi bersama. Jadi, itulah yang biasanya saya katakan kepada orang-orang yang berinvestasi di dana kami, Hei, Anda berinvestasi di kami, dan mari bekerja sama.

(27:24) Jeremy Au:

Bagaimana rasanya melempar piringan hitam?

(27:26) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Ini menakutkan karena saya pikir saya sangat mengagumi mereka. Jelas, banyak dari mereka yang saya harapkan bisa menjadi panutan saya di masa depan untuk investasi tahap awal dan adil, dan saya pikir mereka semua mungkin lebih pintar dari saya. Sangat sulit dan menakutkan, namun saya tahu bahwa itu adalah bagian lain dari keberanian. Anda hanya harus terjun. Anda tidak bisa memasukkan satu kaki ke dalam dan mengeluarkan satu kaki lagi. Anda hanya perlu terjun dan mungkin mengerjakan tesis Anda.

(27:48) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Dan kemudian mari kita lihat. Luar biasa. Saya tidak sabar untuk melihat bagaimana hasilnya di masa depan. Untuk itu, saya ingin merangkum tiga hal penting yang bisa diambil dari percakapan ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang Indonesia, saya pikir itu sangat menarik karena kita tidak hanya berbicara tentang Indonesia sebagai pasar, secara makro dan semuanya serba cerah, tetapi juga membandingkan apa yang kita lihat di tahun 2020 dengan di mana kita berada saat ini di tahun 2023, 2024, juga melihat para pendiri, pola pikir, jenis bisnis, dan kualitas yang kita coba perhatikan. Jadi saya pikir ada banyak realitas yang menarik tentang hal ini.

Kedua, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang bagaimana Anda mendirikan Kopital dalam hal bagaimana Anda bertemu dengan co-founder Anda, bagaimana Kopi Kenangan berperan sebagai bagian dari struktur dan dukungan dan pekerjaan yang ada, tetapi juga bagaimana Anda menggalang modal untuk mewujudkannya dan bagaimana Anda menemukan ceruk pasar dan diferensiasi, bukan? Jadi dia mengatakan seperti, Hei, kami berkolaborasi dengan Anda, tidak bersaing dengan Anda, tetapi juga kami menyediakan, untuk para pendiri, serangkaian hasil dan nilai tambah yang berbeda yang dapat Anda berikan.

Terakhir, terima kasih banyak telah berbicara tentang pintu keluar di Asia Tenggara. Bukan pembicaraan yang mudah karena banyak orang yang tidak ingin membicarakannya, dan saya pikir ada gajah besar di dalam ruangan untuk para ahli di ruangan ini. Dan kami juga berbicara banyak tentang fakta bahwa belum banyak jalan keluar, tetapi juga fakta bahwa jalan keluar yang kami bicarakan juga memiliki hubungan dengan BEI, Bursa Efek Indonesia. Kami berbicara tentang GoTo, Grab, Bukalapak, dan juga Sea Group, bukan? Jadi saya pikir ini adalah percakapan yang menarik tentang realitasnya, dan juga apa artinya bagi para pendiri yang perlu memikirkan bagaimana mereka ingin berniat dan melakukan pendekatan untuk exit, tetapi juga bagi para funders yang membutuhkannya, ketangkasan, dan bagaimana mereka exit juga. Secara keseluruhan, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi pemikiran Anda, Fandy.

(29:21) Fandy Cendrajaya:

Terima kasih telah menerima saya, Jeremy.