Indonesia: Young Democracy Elections, Gen Z & Millennial 52% Electorate Majority & 2023 Bear Market Reflections with Gita Sjahrir - E377

· Podcast Episodes,Indonesia,VC and Angels,Southeast Asia

 

“It’s so good to see that the generation after me is being much more proactive, creating all these short form videos in very informational platforms, and also having all the multiple access to this information. And as our country keeps growing, they simply cannot ignore progress. You have to play the game with everyone else. You have to be on these different social media channels. You have to learn to create content in bite-sized pieces. You cannot make flyers that are 20 pages long anymore. You have to make things relevant for your market.” - Gita Sjahrir

“I really believe that what determines the results long term is your habits. I say that not just for companies, but also for people. In the end, when I look at investments and life in general, it's really not just about leveraging the good times, but also about surfing through the bad times. So if you have great habits in your personal and your professional life and they tend to trickle over to other things, then you can probably withstand almost anything.” - Gita Sjahrir

“Trust is a big asset. That's a huge part of anything. In terms of work and business, it’s really about the trust you have and that ability to communicate effectively with all your different stakeholders, your founders, and investors. And that is all based on a certain amount of what habits you’re putting and implementing in your work. Do you have certain SOPs for communications? Do you have certain best practices that you maintain with founders and investors? 2023 really drilled into me the importance of having these very strong and positive habits, including communication strategies.”- Gita Sjahrir

Gita Sjahrir, Head of Investment at BNI Ventures, and Jeremy Au discussed three main topics:

1. 2023 Bear Market Reflections: Jeremy and Gita touched on the local startup market downturn, the importance of sticking to business fundamentals and good corporate governance to navigate economic headwinds, and how VCs have to build trust with founders.

2. Indonesia Young Democracy: Gita walked through Indonesia’ relatively new electoral system, the negotiations process post the election, and the significance in shaping policy. She also touched on the young age of political parties and emphasized the increasing cooperation between the public and private sectors post-1998.

3. Gen Z & Millennial Electorate Majority: Gita shared her observations about Gen Z in Indonesia, noting their active involvement in politics and public service, idealism, and significant role in addressing environmental and inequality issues. She highlighted the differences and similarities between Indonesian Gen Z and their global counterparts, emphasizing their active engagement in the political discourse through modern communication mediums like short-form video like TikTok and Instagram Reels.

Jeremy and Gita also reviewed the evolution of democracies in Southeast Asia, the nuances of Indonesian politics, and the significance of party affiliations.

Supported by HDMall

HD Mall is a healthcare marketplace in Southeast Asia connecting patients to over 1,800 medical providers. This covers multiple categories such as dental, aesthetics, and elective surgeries. Over 300,000 patients have accessed more affordable healthcare via HD Mall. Get yourself a well-deserved health checkup. If you're in Thailand, go to hdmall.co.th. If you're in Indonesia, go to hdmall.id.

(01:30) Jeremy Au:

Hey, Gita, what a wonderful day it is.

(01:32) Gita Sjahrir:

Hey, thanks so much for talking to me today.

(01:34) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, well, you know, the big news for this is it's the start of 2024. 2023 was a big year with the unraveling of Zero Interest Rate Policy, became a bear market simultaneously across the US and Southeast Asia. RIP is ZIRP, and then 2024, there's a lot of big things coming up in store. So, before we start and talk about 2024, what do you think was the biggest thing for you in 2023?

(01:57) Gita Sjahrir:

Oh, my gosh. I think being in a bear market always teaches me to stick to fundamentals. I think it's something I say all the time. And my analysts and associates and probably my entire team is very sick of hearing that from me. But I really believe that what determines the results long term is your habits.

And I say that not just for companies, but I also say that for people. In the end, when I look at investments and when I look at life in general, it's really not about just leveraging the good times, but it's also about surfing through the bad times, right? So if you have great habits in your personal and your professional life and they tend to trickle over to in some ways, then you can probably withstand almost anything.

So I became much more focused on fundamentals, good habits, good governance, and all of those things, again, not just for companies, but also for personal life and everything to do with my both personal and work life balance.

(02:52) Jeremy Au:

I think for myself, 2023 was very much a big reminder of how a bad understanding of business can really lead you astray. So I think I've met obviously founders who are not technically sound and then so be it. The companies undergo that turmoil, but I've met a lot, actually a lot of good founders who are very thoughtful about the business, but at some level, due to the interaction with the board, the economics, the tracking, the North goal, the assumption that growth is more important, profitability kind of get really hammered by this simultaneous macro environment. And I think it really reminded me what it takes to, I think at one level, know the answer in a sense like, Hey, you know, it's not GMV and for example, your CM2 is your revenue on the platform side and your CM3 or 4 is your actual cost margin or contributor margin. That's like, I think I know it at one level and then you explain it to them and it can be argumentative or whatever it is, but in a bull market, you could just grow that like crazy. And then the bear market, it turns out that there's a reversion of these norms which is quite sudden.

I think the flip side from my perspective as well, was it made me reflect on what does it take to build out the credibility and trust to be able to get through that because at the end of the day, that's the only one out of X number of investors that in the market, not alone the whole universe of advisor talking to, and then looking at what they think the fundraising market wants to see from them and so so forth. And just because you have the, you know, air quote, technically or more conservative point of view that turns out to be better in the bear market doesn't mean that you're hurt. So, I don't really get any thrill from saying like, Oh, I'm right.

And your company's dead because it's terrible because people lose their jobs. The founder is like really sad and you got to have other stuff. Now, it's got me thinking, it's like, okay, what does it take? Because the truth is we know there's going to be another bull market in 10 years and there's going to be another bull market in 15 years. And So I think it's an interesting reflection about not just knowing the answer, but also being able to, I wouldn't say the word be persuasive because that implies it's about persuasion. How do you reach that consensus more deeply? And I think no answers here, but is this something that I reflected on for 2023.

(04:50) Gita Sjahrir:

Thank you. That's very cool. And you're right on that. When we think of working and business in general, the really big asset is trust. That's a huge part of anything, really. But in work, it really is about the trust you have and that ability to communicate effectively with all your different stakeholders, with your founders, with your investors, and that is all based on a certain amount of what habits are you putting and you're implementing in your work? Do you have certain SOPs for communications? Do you have certain best practices that you maintain with founders and with investors? And I think again, 2023 really drilled into me the importance of just having these very strong and positive habits, including communication strategies.

(05:36) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, definitely. And now, everyone's thinking about 2024, right? Because it's like, oh, okay, we're at the bottom, hopefully, how long is this bottom going to be for? What are the big things going to happen this year? And we were just chatting a little bit that one of the big things for the Indonesian market, of course, is the presidential elections.

(05:50) Gita Sjahrir:

Actually, what's super interesting this year is that a lot of the world's largest electoral democracies are having their elections. So I think whenever people have concerns about the way things are going now, and then they say things such as, oh, my vote doesn't matter. Well, if you think about how many large countries with population sizes of Indonesia, 285 million, the United States, 300 million. That's a lot of people deciding on who would be essentially running their policies for four or five years or more depending where you are. And I think that's why when I think of, so many people also tend to get more apathetic over time, just saying, oh there's no changes. I'm like, yeah, be very careful what you say and what you think simply because you can actually create a change.

And I think if enough people, so for example, most people of voting age, which is depending on the country, it could be like a hundred million people, think that they can't make a change and they can't. So, now that we're on the brink of Indonesian elections, I'm very big on encouraging people that even though this might, for you, not be a big deal or it doesn't affect you, almost everything in politics and in policy affect you, especially if you're in business. Lots of things will affect you, right?

And so I think with Indonesia, again, we're a fairly new electoral system, right? I think we're only at 26 years right now. There are a lot of things that are still being put in place as we speak, but for the most part, our elections tend to go very quickly. And usually we tend to have the results by that night or latest, the next day. So in general, so it's a, try to call it a democratic party, but more it's a big event that happens for us. And what I like about it too, is at least in Indonesia because again, our democratic system is still fairly new there's a lot of participation by young people for voting.

(07:43) Jeremy Au:

I think it's very true about the fact that so many democracies Taiwan had its elections in January. Later this year, there's also not just Indonesia, but also India, as well as the USA, and that's huge. If you think about it, it's like all the big players, pretty much, especially in the geopolitics of today. I was recently in DC last week and I was visiting various monuments and I was catching on my friend yet Magruder and it was a big reminder that 2020 elections was decided by effectively 40,000 voters, swing voters in the US you know, between one candidate and I'm just like, wow, that's like, every vote counts.

And the fact is, like you said, being able to vote is a privilege and a gift. I think there are many societies in the world that don't get to have a vote, and again, I'm not making a normative statement here, but I'm just saying like, hey, if you have it, just take the time and vote for the future, right? I think it's a great way to signal what your intent is. And I think what's interesting is that for Indonesia as well, there are three candidates who are running and I think folks are thinking to themselves like, okay, what does that mean for the Indonesia economy? What's, you know, the dust settles? What does the process look like? And what does the post electoral process look like as well?

(08:44) Gita Sjahrir: Yeah. I think when we're looking at the legacy of the last 10 years, and actually, this has been in the works since we started electoral democracies post 1998. There is more of a cooperation now, I would say, between the public and private sector. For the longest time, due to the dictatorship of Suharto pre-1998, oftentimes back then, the keys of power was really held by one person, which is the leader. And then it trickles down, right? So, there's good and bad in that, I'll say. The good is when you have only one key of power, technically everything can be done very efficiently because one person says one thing, everyone has to follow it no matter what. Of course, this gets very questionable if that one person decides to do things that may not benefit a lot of people. So that can also breed the grounds for other societal ills. And so, I think one of the things that have been bridged in the country over the many years since 1998 is more trust between public and private sector.

So, for example, in Indonesia, there's a lot more participation by Kadin, in a balanced way, which is our Chamber of Commerce. I think that's the translation. So, between them and whoever's in administration, and that is a concept that pretty much all the candidates don't want to disturb or make worse. They want to continue to have a more robust private sector. They want to continue to have more wealth in the country, create more entrepreneurship opportunities, create more employment opportunities, increase people's well-being and also very important for lots of people to understand the Indonesian constitution when it was built circa independence in the 40s is a lot about ensuring that people have access to basic needs. I think that is something that I would say all the candidates can agree on mainly it's also because it's in your constitution.

(10:36) Jeremy Au:

Yeah.

(10:36) Gita Sjahrir:

It is a priority for the country in general.

(10:39) Jeremy Au:

I really like the history they put there, which is that, the truth is that Southeast Asia democracy is relatively new. I mean, there was a wave of decolonization after World War II, 1950s, 1960s, and then democracy is new in India. It's new in many parts of Southeast Asia. It's a learning process, not just for the various political parties, but also for society, right? And like I said, business as well, but how to accommodate it. And I think that's where some of the loss of translation part we talked about in the media side has come in because it's like, okay, everything is like black or white, good versus evil. And I'm like, oh, we're all humans, you know, off lock candidates.

And, you know, what's that less meant, and I think it's a blessing when I think a system is able to generate three viable candidates, if that makes sense, that like, broadly makes sense, I mean, obviously different visions for the future, but it's not life or death. Well, hopefully not, but, you know.

(11:23) Gita Sjahrir:

Hopefully not.

(11:23) Jeremy Au:

Hopefully not, right? But, you know, but I think, you know, when you have three viable candidates, then, I think there's a whole point of democracy is that a lot of people have those paths, but it's within that.

(11:30) Gita Sjahrir:

Yeah. I think I really like your assessment of how in our system again, because it's so new, in the end, we don't have as binary and insidious hyper polarization that happens in a lot of much more established and older democracies. So, for example, I think hyper polarization did happen in the previous election, to no one's benefit, of course, we learn in other countries, but this time around, what I notice is that tends to be more of a conversation. I mean, very early and very surface level conversation, but okay, fine. There are more conversations about the mission and vision. There are more conversations about programs regarding social services and social benefits. There are more of these topic focused questions rather than things that are just inciting anger. So, rather than going into a very basic, very divisive topics, especially anything involving race and ethnicity, which tends to happen in a lot of emerging democracies. We are now at least sticking to more questions regarding track record, future vision and mission, political party affiliation, what is that party known for?

So, at least the conversation is not as hyper polarized as it was in the previous elections. And that I say, as small of a progress that is, it's still a progress. We're talking political discourse.

(12:52) Jeremy Au:

And there's a real gift, honestly, because it's not a given, this one. And then this, like you said, just having an election one after another is progress, right? And I think the beauty of a democracy, hopefully, it's like, hey, you didn't win this time around, but hopefully in four years, five years, again, I crack at it, and I think if those are the rules everybody agrees to, then, I don't know what's the word, like there's a ceiling of how angry you can get if that makes sense, and you just work very hard, and you campaign very hard, but I mean, it could get really bad. I think people forget how bad it can get. Like you said, you know, Singapore, Malaysia had racial riots in the 1960s. It was a big, big hot mess and it left a dissolution of the federation, right?

And Singapore and Malaysia went their separate ways. It was just irresolvable because of, like you said, culture, society, but also the behavior of various politicians that acted to effectively inflame the situation, right? So I think I'm glad to hear that, you know, the stewardship by political actors is a something that we hope for. And I'm glad to see more of.

(13:45) Gita Sjahrir:

Yeah, I wouldn't say it's down to zero. I wouldn't say that there are zero conversations about ethnicities, religion, et cetera, because those are just hot fun topics that are, I think, evergreen in Indonesian politics, but I realized now that there's just a lot more media coverage and opinions. And also, when you look at social media, like the conversations have been really more geared towards again, despite very surface level discussions of it, but it's about something, like it's about mining. It's about political party, track record, you know their old administrative track record. So again, at least it now has more meat to the discussion Yeah,

(14:26) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, it's the trend, right? And I think that's what I'm happy about. I think what's interesting, I'm kind of curious as well, is like when you look ahead past election, so, obviously you want to settle on a candidate, but what do you think the rest of 2024? Because I think in my head, for me personally, I think it's a little bit clearer what the post electoral process happens in the US, for example, or what the post electoral process happens, for example, in Singapore and Malaysia. I'm curious what happens in Indonesia from your perspective.

(14:51) Gita Sjahrir:

So this is where it's super important to realize that Indonesian politics is not American politics. And oftentimes, when people are based in, let's say, the US or the UK, so they are very used to whatever system that they're in, to look at everything through that lens instead. I know that in the US, you know, because I lived there for decades there's this hyper polarization and this notion that if one person gets elected, automatically everything goes to hell, so it's true. There's this view that there's one morally right option, and that's it. And in that morally right option then you're wrong. And another thing that doesn't help is whoever gets elected then will attempt to do their best in the public policy space to ensure that the other party never comes back and just never gets represented. That is just something that's not a pattern in Indonesian politics.

(15:45) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, So what does it look like? So, you know, election results come out, there'll be a split. Maybe someone has a majority, there are two smaller minorities in terms of the representation, but how does that shake out after that?

(15:56) Gita Sjahrir:

Yeah. So we, we are set to have either one or two rounds and basically a political candidate can end up being president if they win a very, very large majority in the first round, then there's no need for a second round. But if it's a small enough percentage, then they'll do a second runoff. And that's our system. And we also don't have a electoral colleges. It's, you know, 1 person, 1 vote. And then usually what happens after the results are in. You know, then the winning candidate starts creating their cabinet, their structure. Now, that is the part where sometimes they will hire people of the losing party, or the losing candidate like that's actually fairly common again, because the country is still very young, it's still only again, what, 26 year electoral democracy and also very young in terms of GDP per capita, we're still under $5,000 GDP per capita, so it's almost like a lot of people realize we don't have a lot of space to just mess around and be hyper polarized because we can't afford to, like we really need to do a lot of work.

We still have a lot of infrastructures to be built. We still have a lot of foreign investment to attract. We still have a lot of things in our homework that we need to do. So, oftentimes, what happens is even the losing candidates or the losing parties will get absorbed in the administration. That's why, sometimes one of the biggest critics of Indonesian politics is, if you look at it from a party standpoint, it's not true that a party will have that same concept or value for 50 years. They may change over time because again, the parties are also very young. So it's not that the party's been around for 130 years. The party's probably been around for 20. And because the party's been around for 20 years, sometimes they may have to shift, or they may have to change their views according to the context, and also according to the market that they then attract.

Maybe they end up attracting more millennials, or Gen Z, in which they start having to change how they view certain types of policies, or maybe your economy changes and your context changes even questions about equality, right? That changes over time. So, that's why when people look at political parties in Indonesia, they often go, Oh, how come this party isn't known for that one thing and only one thing and it hasn't changed and I'm like, well probably because it's been around for 20 years. Probably because it's also still trying to find himself, because it's still trying to figure out what it should stand for, which is common. And I think that's why one of the benefits about the Indonesian electoral year is that I see more collaboration happening, usually post elections, than a lot of other much more established democracies.

(18:34) Jeremy Au:

You mentioned Gen Z, right? And obviously everyone loves Gen Z. I'm just kind of curious, so when you look at Gen Z what does Gen Z look like in Indonesia in terms of like, you know, what kind of issues they're concerned about? How are they consuming the news? How are they making decisions? Because I think most of the public media is about American Gen Z and how they make decisions. I'm so curious, what does it look like in Indonesia?

(18:53) Gita Sjahrir:

I think the big difference too, that I see in politics in Indonesia is how many young people are actually involved in it. Not just from a grassroots perspective, but all the way up into legislation, all the way, even in the ministry. We just have a lot of young people. And again, part of the benefit of being a very young democracy, you also need people. We're a young democracy. We're also an emerging economy. So we need people in both places. And what tends to happen is sometimes, when young people feel that they've maxed out their growth in the private sector, they become very attracted to serving in the public sector. So I know a lot of young people in the public sector also may be in political party management and even in grassroots organization. I know a lot of Gen Z activists and they're doing fantastic job in Indonesia because Gen Z also makes up such a large percentage of the country. So like, what is it? 40-ish percent is under 35.

(19:49) Jeremy Au:

But it's huge. Everybody's Gen Z. Who cares about the millennials?

(19:52) Gita Sjahrir:

Like it's so large. It's so big. I mean, it's so many people, I don't know, like, don't quote me on that, maybe check it first, but I think it's like 40-ish percent.

(20:03) Gita Sjahrir:

Really large number, and in a lot of places, maybe they see it just as potential voters they need to attract, right? Yeah, Indonesia probably sees the same thing, but the big difference is they also go into politics. They also end up serving in public sector.

(20:16) Jeremy Au:

Interesting.

(20:17) Gita Sjahrir:

They actually do things. They're very active and they're very idealistic, which is a great thing. Oftentimes, people look at idealism as a negative thing because you should be realistic, but then again, Gen Z's remind us that you can't change anything if you're always realistic, like you do need to dream bigger.

(20:35) Jeremy Au:

Yeah.

(20:36) Gita Sjahrir:

Make bigger and greater things. They're right, and in Indonesia, some of the big things that Gen Z have pushed are issues regarding the environment, which I think is, I mean, it's beyond timely, I think we needed to change like circa 50 years ago, but here they are, fighting the fight. They ask questions a lot about inequality, which, yes, as a developing economy, that is something we have to watch out for, because I also don't know how healthy it is for the social fabric of a country if the inequality is so big that you have millions of people finding it very hard to get money for their health care and for their chronic health conditions.

And then, a really large amount of people just owning 50% of the wealth. I don't think that's probably gonna bode really well for the country. They're gonna have a lot of unrest. They're going to have a lot of deep mistrust with the system, which, are you sure you like to have that if you're a democracy, right? And I think that's something that these Gen Z's really, they don't just talk the talk, but they really walk the walk, constantly bringing it up in conversations and discourses, including in the private sector. They're active in Kadin. Actually, they're active in a lot of other entrepreneur networks and national organizations, and they really push and lobby for these questions which is great.

Sometimes in Indonesia, when we create national policies, it may seem logically like it's the right thing to do, built infrastructure. I mean, no one's going to argue with you on that. That it's a good thing, but it's also good to have the Gen Z voice in it to give us checks and balances and ask, hey, is that environmentally correct? Are you doing the best that you can for the environment as you pursue this project? Or, hey, are you violating indigenous people's rights? Are you giving them the benefit of really getting positive impact out of this project, and that's the kind of thing that the Gen Z, not just voters, but also activists, organizers political party affiliates, that's what they've given to us and contributed to the country.

(22:38) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. And what's interesting is that what defines Gen Z, of course, is not just, their youth, which means that they have these dreams and they're not as cynical or maybe as the millennials, although it was like, you know, but also the other part is that they grew up in the internet age, right?

So they always had internet growing up and mobile internet, which is different from like, dial up, which is for the millennials. And I think big things that people would, I think casually would say would be like, short form video is very important.

(23:01) Jeremy Au:

Reviews and peer endorsements are very important, social networks, WhatsApp, not Facebook, for example, those are the things that it was stereotypically say, for example, the US description of Gen Z voters in terms of the information diet, how would you look at it for Indonesia?

(23:17) Gita Sjahrir:

It's very similar. So, I think one of the things that Gen Z have really spearheaded in Indonesia is the dissemination of information in very entertaining form, and they're very proactive about it. So I'm gonna give them mad props for this. And, in Indonesia, what I'm noticing a lot is, even Gen Zs that don't understand politics in the beginning, they try to find ways to understand it. Lots of people come up with solutions for it too, which is amazing. And so, by the way, I am not an investor, nor am I anything in this company.

(23:52) Gita Sjahrir:

But, you know, some of the platforms that I know that have done a great job informing people are, bijakmemilih .id, and also 'What is up Indonesia?', where they package information about Indonesian politics in a way that young people can understand, digest, and also involve nuance in all of it. Because oftentimes when you talk about politics, it's very easy to get into a black or white, good and bad, right or wrong binary conversation. And what the Gen Z movements I've seen in Indonesia have attempted to do is wrestle it and make it theirs, right? Actually it's It's a lot of nuance, and it's a lot of nuance because of this, because of our history, because of our constitution, our track record, everything. And that is something like I'm very proud to see because I think oftentimes in countries that are getting richer or just getting more modern, there's sometimes this apathetic view of politics. There's oh, I don't need to care about it. It doesn't matter to me, especially when I was younger, I will say that for a lot of us, we were all just, oh how can I even change anything?

(24:56) Gita Sjahrir:

So it's so good to see that the generation after me is being much more proactive, just much more creative, creating all these short form videos in very informational platforms, and also just having all the multiple access to this information. So, you don't want to see us on your laptop? Go to TikTok. You don't want to go to TikTok? Here's us on Instagram. You don't want to do Instagram? You know, here's another way to access our information. So that I think has been huge. And as our country keeps growing, they simply cannot ignore progress. You have to play the game with everyone else. You have to be on these different social media channels. You have to learn to create content in bite-sized pieces, like you cannot make flyers that are 20 pages long anymore. You have to make things relevant for your market.

(25:46) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. I was walking around D. C. And we went to the Roosevelt Memorial World War II and FDR. And, there was a sculpture of him speaking effectively over the radio to somebody was listening at home. And what my friend who was being a tour guide. Yeah. And I was saying like, Oh, you know, FDR was the master of this new communication medium called a radio.

All right. And so he won that right. And then, yeah. He's like, you know, and you just reminded me of that because what I said with Fian was like, I said, hey, you know, JFK was, you know, the master of the new medium called television, right? He looked good on television. He spoke well. And then you could say that Trump was definitely the master of Twitter. So there's that. And then, what he reminded me of is like, who's going to be the master of short form video, of TikTok or YouTube, shorts or Instagram Reels. I mean, they're the same format, right? 30 seconds. It's a real, what's the word, like you said, information medium revolution, right? And whoever masters it is going to be on top.

(26:41) Gita Sjahrir:

Exactly. Yeah. I think also there's a lot of probably fear that if we do only the short form mediums, therefore, people will not get into deeper conversations, like, I mean, yes, there's that risk. Of course. And of course, there's the risk that, you know, with a proliferation of AI then the upcoming deep fakes that it's going to make it much easier. And it does make it much easier to make short form videos with a lot of misinformation.

I guess I counter that with the sense that as what you said, it's not that people didn't do that before either though. It's not that radio could not be used for misinformation back in the day. It's not that when television came out and became the new on television as a medium that it also wasn't used in a way that's hurtful for other candidates. Like that will always exist, like, no matter your media. So I think it's more about like, how do we find safeguards in order to continue to create helpful and informative, new types of information, right? Like, how do you do it in forms that will matter over time for our future? Because you cannot not progress.

Like, you can't stuck your grounds and just say, I know that's big, but I'll just never go there because that's simply not your market. And again, as someone who's very big into product market fit, I think I say it all the time. I'm like, dude, do you have product market fit? Product market fit exists for everyone including politics. Who's your market? Who's your constituents? Who's your stakeholders? Who cares about you, right? And that's the case for almost everything and everybody, private and public sector.

(28:15) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, amazing. On that note, I'd love to kind of like summarize the three big takeaways I got from this conversation. First of all, thanks for sharing about, our 2023 reflections about what it means to be thoughtful and, thinking through the fundamentals in terms of business, but also in terms of governance, as well in terms of the business model.

Secondly, thank you for walking us through the Indonesia elections and I think not just the process, but also thinking through, I think, the history of it, the fact that this is still a young electoral democracy and the fact that, this election so far, the campaign has been a step better than the last one and walking us through, like what that post electoral process where the negotiations happen and there's integration of the various points of view. I think it's really heartening. Lastly, thanks for sharing about the Gen Z generation in Indonesia, and not just in terms of the communication mediums and their habits, but also how they are similar to some of the trends that we see across Gen Z voters across the world. Also, I think specific differences about especially how they are also willing to be part of the public service as well. On that note, thank you so much, Gita.

(29:13) Gita Sjahrir:

Thank you so much.

"Senang sekali melihat generasi setelah saya menjadi jauh lebih proaktif, membuat video-video berdurasi pendek dalam platform yang sangat informatif, dan juga memiliki banyak akses untuk mendapatkan informasi. Dan karena negara kita terus berkembang, mereka tidak bisa mengabaikan kemajuan. Anda harus memainkan permainan ini dengan orang lain. Anda harus ada di berbagai saluran media sosial yang berbeda. Anda harus belajar membuat konten dalam potongan-potongan kecil. Anda tidak bisa lagi membuat brosur yang panjangnya 20 halaman. Anda harus membuat hal-hal yang relevan untuk pasar Anda." - Gita Sjahrir

 

"Saya benar-benar percaya bahwa yang menentukan hasil jangka panjang adalah kebiasaan Anda. Saya mengatakan hal ini bukan hanya untuk perusahaan, tapi juga untuk orang-orang. Pada akhirnya, ketika saya melihat investasi dan kehidupan secara umum, ini bukan hanya tentang memanfaatkan saat-saat yang baik, tetapi juga tentang berselancar di saat-saat yang buruk. Jadi, jika Anda memiliki kebiasaan yang baik dalam kehidupan pribadi dan profesional Anda dan kebiasaan tersebut cenderung menular ke hal-hal lain, maka Anda mungkin dapat bertahan dalam hampir semua hal." - Gita Sjahrir

 

"Kepercayaan adalah aset yang besar. Itu adalah bagian yang sangat penting dalam segala hal. Dalam hal pekerjaan dan bisnis, ini benar-benar tentang kepercayaan yang Anda miliki dan kemampuan untuk berkomunikasi secara efektif dengan semua pemangku kepentingan yang berbeda, para pendiri, dan investor. Dan itu semua didasarkan pada sejumlah kebiasaan yang Anda terapkan dalam pekerjaan Anda. Apakah Anda memiliki SOP tertentu untuk komunikasi? Apakah Anda memiliki praktik terbaik tertentu yang Anda pertahankan dengan para pendiri dan investor? Tahun 2023 benar-benar mengasah saya tentang pentingnya memiliki kebiasaan yang sangat kuat dan positif, termasuk strategi komunikasi." - Gita Sjahrir

Gita Sjahrir, Kepala Investasi di BNI Ventures, dan Jeremy Au membahas tiga topik utama:

1. Refleksi Pasar Bearish 2023: Jeremy dan Gita membahas tentang penurunan pasar startup lokal, pentingnya berpegang teguh pada fundamental bisnis dan tata kelola perusahaan yang baik untuk menghadapi tantangan ekonomi, dan bagaimana perusahaan modal ventura harus membangun kepercayaan dengan para pendiri.

2. Demokrasi Muda Indonesia: Gita membahas sistem pemilihan umum yang relatif baru di Indonesia, proses negosiasi setelah pemilu, dan pentingnya peran pemuda dalam membentuk kebijakan. Ia juga menyinggung tentang usia muda partai politik dan menekankan pada peningkatan kerja sama antara sektor publik dan swasta pasca 1998.

3. Gen Z & Mayoritas Pemilih Milenial: Gita berbagi pengamatannya tentang Gen Z di Indonesia, mencatat keterlibatan aktif mereka dalam politik dan pelayanan publik, idealisme, dan peran penting mereka dalam mengatasi masalah lingkungan dan ketidaksetaraan. Ia menyoroti perbedaan dan persamaan antara Gen Z Indonesia dengan Gen Z di seluruh dunia, dengan menekankan keterlibatan aktif mereka dalam wacana politik melalui media komunikasi modern seperti video berdurasi pendek seperti TikTok dan Instagram Reels.

Jeremy dan Gita juga mengulas evolusi demokrasi di Asia Tenggara, nuansa politik Indonesia, dan pentingnya afiliasi partai.

 

(Jeremy Au:)

Hei, Gita, hari yang indah sekali.

(01:32) Gita Sjahrir:

Hei, terima kasih banyak sudah mau berbicara dengan saya hari ini.

(01:34) Jeremy Au:

Ya, Anda tahu, berita besar untuk ini adalah ini adalah awal tahun 2024. Tahun 2023 adalah tahun yang besar dengan terurainya Kebijakan Suku Bunga Nol, menjadi pasar bearish secara serentak di seluruh AS dan Asia Tenggara. RIP adalah ZIRP, dan kemudian 2024, ada banyak hal besar yang akan terjadi. Jadi, sebelum kita mulai dan berbicara tentang 2024, menurut Anda, apa yang menjadi hal terbesar bagi Anda di tahun 2023?

(01:57) Gita Sjahrir:

Ya ampun, saya rasa berada di pasar bearish selalu mengajarkan saya untuk tetap berpegang pada fundamental. Saya pikir itu adalah sesuatu yang saya katakan sepanjang waktu. Dan para analis dan rekan-rekan saya dan mungkin seluruh tim saya sangat muak mendengar hal itu dari saya. Namun saya benar-benar percaya bahwa yang menentukan hasil dalam jangka panjang adalah kebiasaan Anda.

Dan saya mengatakan hal ini bukan hanya untuk perusahaan, namun saya juga mengatakannya untuk orang-orang. Pada akhirnya, ketika saya melihat investasi dan ketika saya melihat kehidupan secara umum, ini bukan hanya tentang memanfaatkan masa-masa indah, tetapi juga tentang berselancar di masa-masa sulit, bukan? Jadi, jika Anda memiliki kebiasaan yang baik dalam kehidupan pribadi dan profesional Anda dan kebiasaan tersebut cenderung menular dalam beberapa hal, maka Anda mungkin bisa bertahan dalam hampir semua hal.

Jadi saya menjadi jauh lebih fokus pada fundamental, kebiasaan baik, tata kelola yang baik, dan semua hal tersebut, sekali lagi, tidak hanya untuk perusahaan, tapi juga untuk kehidupan pribadi dan segala sesuatu yang berkaitan dengan keseimbangan kehidupan pribadi dan pekerjaan.

(02:52) Jeremy Au:

Saya rasa bagi saya sendiri, tahun 2023 merupakan pengingat yang sangat besar tentang bagaimana pemahaman yang buruk tentang bisnis dapat benar-benar menyesatkan Anda. Jadi saya rasa saya telah bertemu dengan para pendiri yang secara teknis tidak memiliki pemahaman yang baik dan membiarkannya. Perusahaan-perusahaan mengalami gejolak itu, tetapi saya telah bertemu banyak, sebenarnya banyak pendiri yang baik yang sangat bijaksana tentang bisnis, tetapi pada tingkat tertentu, karena interaksi dengan dewan, ekonomi, pelacakan, tujuan Utara, asumsi bahwa pertumbuhan lebih penting, profitabilitas benar-benar dipukul oleh lingkungan makro yang simultan ini. Dan saya pikir hal itu benar-benar mengingatkan saya tentang apa yang diperlukan untuk, saya pikir pada satu tingkat, mengetahui jawabannya dalam arti seperti, Hei, Anda tahu, ini bukan GMV dan misalnya, CM2 Anda adalah pendapatan Anda di sisi platform dan CM3 atau 4 Anda adalah margin biaya atau margin kontributor yang sebenarnya. Itu seperti, saya pikir saya mengetahuinya pada satu tingkat dan kemudian Anda menjelaskannya kepada mereka dan itu bisa menjadi argumentatif atau apa pun itu, tetapi di pasar bullish, Anda bisa menumbuhkannya seperti orang gila. Dan kemudian di pasar bearish, ternyata ada pembalikan norma-norma ini yang cukup mendadak.

Saya rasa sisi lain dari sudut pandang saya juga, hal ini membuat saya merenungkan apa yang diperlukan untuk membangun kredibilitas dan kepercayaan agar dapat melewati hal tersebut, karena pada akhirnya, itu adalah satu-satunya dari X jumlah investor yang ada di pasar, bukan hanya seluruh penasihat yang berbicara, lalu melihat apa yang menurut mereka ingin dilihat oleh pasar penggalangan dana dari mereka, dan seterusnya. Dan hanya karena Anda memiliki, Anda tahu, penawaran harga, secara teknis atau sudut pandang yang lebih konservatif yang ternyata lebih baik di pasar bearish bukan berarti Anda terluka. Jadi, saya tidak terlalu senang dengan mengatakan, Oh, saya benar.

Dan perusahaan Anda mati karena sangat buruk karena orang-orang kehilangan pekerjaan. Pendirinya seperti sangat sedih dan Anda harus memiliki hal-hal lain. Hal ini membuat saya berpikir, ini seperti, oke, apa yang diperlukan? Karena sebenarnya kita tahu akan ada pasar bullish lagi dalam 10 tahun dan akan ada pasar bullish lagi dalam 15 tahun. Jadi saya pikir ini adalah refleksi yang menarik tentang tidak hanya mengetahui jawabannya, tapi juga mampu, saya tidak akan mengatakan kata persuasif karena itu menyiratkan bahwa ini adalah tentang persuasi. Bagaimana Anda mencapai konsensus tersebut secara lebih mendalam? Saya rasa tidak ada jawaban di sini, tetapi ini adalah sesuatu yang saya renungkan untuk tahun 2023.

(04:50) Gita Sjahrir:

Terima kasih. Itu sangat keren. Dan Anda benar tentang hal itu. Ketika kita berpikir tentang pekerjaan dan bisnis secara umum, aset yang sangat besar adalah kepercayaan. Itu adalah bagian yang sangat penting dalam segala hal. Namun dalam pekerjaan, ini benar-benar tentang kepercayaan yang Anda miliki dan kemampuan untuk berkomunikasi secara efektif dengan semua pemangku kepentingan yang berbeda, dengan para pendiri Anda, dengan para investor Anda, dan itu semua didasarkan pada sejumlah kebiasaan yang Anda terapkan dalam pekerjaan Anda? Apakah Anda memiliki SOP tertentu untuk komunikasi? Apakah Anda memiliki praktik terbaik tertentu yang Anda pertahankan dengan para pendiri dan investor? Dan saya pikir sekali lagi, 2023 benar-benar mengasah saya tentang pentingnya memiliki kebiasaan-kebiasaan yang sangat kuat dan positif, termasuk strategi komunikasi.

(05:36) Jeremy Au:

Ya, tentu saja. Dan sekarang, semua orang berpikir tentang 2024, bukan? Karena ini seperti, oh, oke, kita berada di titik terbawah, mudah-mudahan, berapa lama titik terbawah ini akan berlangsung? Hal-hal besar apa yang akan terjadi tahun ini? Dan kami baru saja mengobrol sedikit bahwa salah satu hal besar untuk pasar Indonesia, tentu saja, adalah pemilihan presiden.

(05:50) Gita Sjahrir:

Sebenarnya, yang sangat menarik tahun ini adalah banyak negara demokrasi elektoral terbesar di dunia yang mengadakan pemilihan umum. Jadi saya pikir setiap kali orang memiliki kekhawatiran tentang bagaimana keadaan sekarang, dan kemudian mereka mengatakan hal-hal seperti, oh, suara saya tidak penting. Nah, jika Anda berpikir tentang berapa banyak negara besar dengan jumlah penduduk sebesar Indonesia, 285 juta, Amerika Serikat, 300 juta. Itu adalah jumlah orang yang memutuskan siapa yang pada dasarnya akan menjalankan kebijakan mereka selama empat atau lima tahun atau lebih, tergantung di mana Anda berada. Dan saya rasa itulah sebabnya ketika saya memikirkan, begitu banyak orang yang cenderung menjadi lebih apatis dari waktu ke waktu, dengan mengatakan, oh, tidak ada perubahan. Saya rasa, ya, berhati-hatilah dengan apa yang Anda katakan dan apa yang Anda pikirkan, karena sebenarnya Anda bisa membuat perubahan.

Dan saya pikir jika cukup banyak orang, misalnya, sebagian besar orang yang sudah cukup umur untuk memilih, yang jumlahnya bisa mencapai seratus juta orang, berpikir bahwa mereka tidak dapat membuat perubahan dan ternyata tidak bisa. Jadi, sekarang kita berada di ambang pemilu Indonesia, saya sangat mendorong orang-orang bahwa meskipun hal ini mungkin, bagi Anda, bukan masalah besar atau tidak memengaruhi Anda, hampir semua hal dalam politik dan kebijakan memengaruhi Anda, terutama jika Anda berkecimpung di dunia bisnis. Banyak hal yang akan mempengaruhi Anda, bukan?

Dan saya pikir dengan Indonesia, sekali lagi, kita adalah negara dengan sistem pemilu yang cukup baru, bukan? Saya pikir kita baru berusia 26 tahun sekarang. Ada banyak hal yang masih dalam tahap penerapan, namun sebagian besar, pemilu kita cenderung berjalan sangat cepat. Dan biasanya kita cenderung mendapatkan hasilnya pada malam itu juga atau paling lambat keesokan harinya. Jadi secara umum, ini adalah pesta demokrasi, tapi lebih merupakan peristiwa besar yang terjadi bagi kami. Dan yang saya sukai dari hal ini juga, setidaknya di Indonesia, karena sekali lagi, sistem demokrasi kita masih cukup baru, ada banyak partisipasi anak muda untuk memilih.

(07:43) Jeremy Au:

Saya rasa sangat benar tentang fakta bahwa begitu banyak negara demokrasi Taiwan yang mengadakan pemilihan umum pada bulan Januari. Akhir tahun ini, tidak hanya Indonesia, tapi juga India, dan juga Amerika Serikat, dan itu sangat besar. Jika Anda memikirkannya, ini seperti semua pemain besar, cukup banyak, terutama dalam geopolitik saat ini. Baru-baru ini saya berada di Washington DC minggu lalu dan saya mengunjungi berbagai monumen dan saya memperhatikan teman saya yang bernama Magruder dan hal ini menjadi pengingat besar bahwa pemilihan umum tahun 2020 diputuskan oleh 40.000 pemilih secara efektif, pemilih yang mengambang (swing voter) di Amerika Serikat, di antara satu kandidat dan saya seperti, wow, ini sangat penting, setiap suara sangat berarti.

Dan faktanya, seperti yang Anda katakan, bisa memilih adalah sebuah keistimewaan dan anugerah. Saya pikir ada banyak masyarakat di dunia yang tidak bisa memilih, dan sekali lagi, saya tidak membuat pernyataan normatif di sini, tapi saya hanya mengatakan, hei, jika Anda memilikinya, luangkanlah waktu dan berikanlah suara Anda untuk masa depan, bukan? Saya rasa ini adalah cara yang bagus untuk menandakan apa yang menjadi tujuan Anda. Dan saya rasa yang menarik adalah bahwa untuk Indonesia juga, ada tiga kandidat yang mencalonkan diri dan saya rasa orang-orang berpikir, oke, apa artinya itu bagi perekonomian Indonesia? Apa yang akan terjadi setelahnya? Seperti apa prosesnya? Dan seperti apa pula proses pasca pemilihan umum?

(08:44) Gita Sjahrir: Ya, saya pikir ketika kita melihat warisan dari 10 tahun terakhir, dan sebenarnya, ini sudah ada sejak kita memulai demokrasi elektoral pasca 1998. Menurut saya, ada lebih banyak kerja sama sekarang antara sektor publik dan swasta. Untuk waktu yang lama, karena kediktatoran Soeharto sebelum tahun 1998, seringkali pada saat itu, kunci-kunci kekuasaan benar-benar dipegang oleh satu orang, yaitu pemimpin. Dan kemudian hal itu akan menetes ke bawah, bukan? Jadi, ada baik dan buruknya, menurut saya. Baiknya adalah ketika Anda hanya memiliki satu kunci kekuasaan, secara teknis segala sesuatu dapat dilakukan dengan sangat efisien karena satu orang mengatakan satu hal, semua orang harus mengikutinya, apa pun yang terjadi. Tentu saja, hal ini akan menjadi sangat dipertanyakan jika satu orang tersebut memutuskan untuk melakukan hal-hal yang mungkin tidak menguntungkan banyak orang. Hal ini juga dapat menjadi dasar bagi penyakit masyarakat lainnya. Jadi, saya pikir salah satu hal yang telah dijembatani di negara ini selama bertahun-tahun sejak tahun 1998 adalah kepercayaan yang lebih besar antara sektor publik dan swasta.

Jadi, misalnya, di Indonesia, ada lebih banyak partisipasi dari Kadin, dengan cara yang seimbang, yaitu Kamar Dagang dan Industri. Saya rasa itulah terjemahannya. Jadi, antara mereka dan siapa pun yang ada di pemerintahan, dan itu adalah konsep yang tidak ingin diganggu atau diperparah oleh hampir semua kandidat. Mereka ingin terus memiliki sektor swasta yang lebih kuat. Mereka ingin terus memiliki lebih banyak kekayaan di negara ini, menciptakan lebih banyak peluang kewirausahaan, menciptakan lebih banyak peluang kerja, meningkatkan kesejahteraan masyarakat dan juga sangat penting bagi banyak orang untuk memahami bahwa konstitusi Indonesia yang dibuat pada masa kemerdekaan di tahun 40-an adalah tentang memastikan bahwa masyarakat memiliki akses ke kebutuhan dasar. Saya pikir itu adalah sesuatu yang menurut saya dapat disetujui oleh semua kandidat, terutama karena hal itu ada di dalam konstitusi.

(10:36) Jeremy Au:

Ya.

(10:36) Gita Sjahrir:

Itu adalah prioritas bagi negara secara umum.

(10:39) Jeremy Au:

Saya sangat menyukai sejarah yang mereka cantumkan di sana, yaitu bahwa demokrasi di Asia Tenggara masih relatif baru. Maksud saya, ada gelombang dekolonisasi setelah Perang Dunia II, tahun 1950-an, 1960-an, dan kemudian demokrasi adalah hal baru di India. Hal ini masih baru di banyak bagian Asia Tenggara. Ini adalah sebuah proses pembelajaran, tidak hanya untuk berbagai partai politik, tetapi juga untuk masyarakat, bukan? Dan seperti yang saya katakan, bisnis juga, tetapi bagaimana cara mengakomodasinya. Dan saya rasa di situlah hilangnya bagian penerjemahan yang kita bicarakan di sisi media, karena seperti, oke, semuanya seperti hitam atau putih, baik atau jahat. Dan saya seperti, oh, kita semua adalah manusia, Anda tahu, kandidat yang tidak bisa dikunci.

Dan, kau tahu, apa yang kurang dari itu Dan saya pikir itu adalah sebuah berkah ketika saya pikir sebuah sistem dapat menghasilkan tiga kandidat yang layak, jika itu masuk akal, yang secara umum masuk akal, maksud saya, visi yang jelas berbeda untuk masa depan, tapi itu bukan hidup atau mati. Yah, mudah-mudahan tidak, tapi, Anda tahu.

(11:23) Gita Sjahrir:

Mudah-mudahan tidak.

(11:23) Jeremy Au:

Mudah-mudahan tidak, kan? Tapi, Anda tahu, tapi saya pikir, Anda tahu, ketika Anda memiliki tiga kandidat yang layak, maka, saya pikir inti dari demokrasi adalah bahwa banyak orang yang memiliki jalur-jalur itu, tapi ada di dalamnya.

(11:30) Gita Sjahrir:

Ya, saya pikir saya sangat menyukai penilaian Anda tentang bagaimana dalam sistem kita, karena sistem kita masih sangat baru, pada akhirnya, kita tidak memiliki polarisasi hiper yang biner dan berbahaya seperti yang terjadi di banyak negara demokrasi yang lebih mapan dan lebih tua. Jadi, misalnya, saya pikir polarisasi hiper memang terjadi pada pemilu sebelumnya, yang tidak menguntungkan siapa pun, tentu saja, kita belajar dari negara lain, tetapi kali ini, yang saya perhatikan adalah bahwa hal itu cenderung lebih banyak dibicarakan. Maksud saya, percakapan yang sangat awal dan sangat permukaan, tapi oke, tidak apa-apa. Ada lebih banyak percakapan tentang misi dan visi. Ada lebih banyak percakapan tentang program-program mengenai layanan sosial dan manfaat sosial. Ada lebih banyak pertanyaan yang berfokus pada topik ini daripada hal-hal yang hanya menyulut kemarahan. Jadi, daripada membahas topik yang sangat mendasar dan memecah belah, terutama yang melibatkan ras dan etnis, yang cenderung terjadi di banyak negara demokrasi baru. Kita sekarang setidaknya lebih banyak membahas tentang rekam jejak, visi dan misi ke depan, afiliasi partai politik, partai itu dikenal karena apa?

Jadi, setidaknya pembicaraan tidak terlalu terpolarisasi seperti pada pemilu-pemilu sebelumnya. Dan saya katakan, sekecil apapun kemajuannya, itu tetap sebuah kemajuan. Kita berbicara tentang wacana politik.

(Jeremy Au:

Dan ada hadiah yang nyata, sejujurnya, karena ini bukan sesuatu yang diberikan, yang satu ini. Dan kemudian ini, seperti yang Anda katakan, hanya dengan mengadakan pemilu satu demi satu adalah sebuah kemajuan, bukan? Dan saya pikir keindahan dari demokrasi adalah, mudah-mudahan, ini seperti, hei, Anda tidak menang kali ini, tapi mudah-mudahan dalam empat tahun, lima tahun, sekali lagi, saya akan menang, dan saya pikir jika itu adalah peraturan yang disetujui semua orang, maka, saya tidak tahu apa istilahnya, seperti ada batas maksimal kemarahan yang dapat Anda dapatkan jika itu masuk akal, dan Anda bekerja sangat keras, dan Anda berkampanye dengan sangat keras, tapi maksud saya, ini bisa menjadi sangat buruk. Saya rasa orang-orang lupa betapa buruknya hal itu bisa terjadi. Seperti yang Anda katakan, Anda tahu, Singapura, Malaysia pernah mengalami kerusuhan rasial pada tahun 1960-an. Itu adalah kekacauan yang sangat besar dan menyebabkan pembubaran federasi, bukan?

Dan Singapura dan Malaysia pun berpisah. Hal itu tidak dapat diselesaikan karena, seperti yang Anda katakan, budaya, masyarakat, dan juga perilaku berbagai politisi yang secara efektif memperkeruh situasi, bukan? Jadi saya rasa saya senang mendengar bahwa, Anda tahu, pengelolaan oleh para aktor politik adalah sesuatu yang kita harapkan. Dan saya senang bisa melihat lebih banyak lagi.

(13:45) Gita Sjahrir:

Ya, saya tidak akan mengatakan bahwa itu turun ke nol. Saya tidak akan mengatakan bahwa tidak ada percakapan tentang etnis, agama, dan sebagainya, karena itu hanyalah topik-topik hangat yang, menurut saya, selalu ada dalam politik Indonesia, tapi saya menyadari sekarang bahwa ada lebih banyak liputan media dan opini. Dan juga, ketika Anda melihat media sosial, percakapannya benar-benar lebih mengarah ke sana lagi, meskipun diskusi-diskusi di tingkat permukaan, tapi ini tentang sesuatu, seperti tentang pertambangan. Ini tentang partai politik, rekam jejak, Anda tahu rekam jejak administratif mereka yang lama. Jadi sekali lagi, setidaknya sekarang ada lebih banyak daging dalam diskusi.

(14:26) Jeremy Au:

Ya, itu adalah trennya, kan? Dan saya pikir itulah yang membuat saya senang. Saya pikir yang menarik, saya juga agak penasaran, adalah ketika Anda melihat ke depan setelah pemilihan umum, jadi, tentu saja Anda ingin memilih seorang kandidat, tapi bagaimana menurut Anda setelah 2024? Karena menurut saya, bagi saya pribadi, saya pikir sedikit lebih jelas apa yang terjadi setelah pemilu di Amerika Serikat, misalnya, atau apa yang terjadi setelah pemilu di Singapura dan Malaysia. Saya ingin tahu apa yang terjadi di Indonesia dari sudut pandang Anda.

(14:51) Gita Sjahrir:

Jadi, di sinilah sangat penting untuk menyadari bahwa politik Indonesia bukanlah politik Amerika. Dan seringkali, ketika orang tinggal di, katakanlah, Amerika Serikat atau Inggris, maka mereka sudah sangat terbiasa dengan sistem apa pun yang mereka gunakan, dan melihat segala sesuatu dari sudut pandang itu. Saya tahu bahwa di AS, karena saya tinggal di sana selama beberapa dekade, ada polarisasi yang sangat tinggi dan anggapan bahwa jika satu orang terpilih, secara otomatis semuanya akan hancur, dan itu benar. Ada pandangan bahwa hanya ada satu pilihan yang benar secara moral, dan hanya itu. Dan jika pilihan itu benar secara moral, maka Anda salah. Dan hal lain yang tidak membantu adalah siapa pun yang terpilih akan berusaha melakukan yang terbaik dalam ruang kebijakan publik untuk memastikan bahwa pihak lain tidak akan pernah kembali dan tidak akan pernah terwakili. Itu adalah sesuatu yang tidak menjadi pola dalam politik Indonesia.

(15:45) Jeremy Au:

Ya, jadi seperti apa bentuknya? Jadi, Anda tahu, hasil pemilu keluar, akan ada perpecahan. Mungkin ada yang mayoritas, ada dua minoritas yang lebih kecil dalam hal representasi, tapi bagaimana hasilnya setelah itu?

(15:56) Gita Sjahrir:

Ya. Jadi kita, kita diatur untuk memiliki satu atau dua putaran dan pada dasarnya seorang kandidat politik dapat menjadi presiden jika mereka memenangkan mayoritas yang sangat, sangat besar pada putaran pertama, maka tidak perlu putaran kedua. Namun jika persentasenya cukup kecil, maka mereka akan mengikuti putaran kedua. Dan itulah sistem kami. Dan kami juga tidak memiliki electoral college. Jadi, Anda tahu, 1 orang, 1 suara. Dan biasanya apa yang terjadi setelah hasilnya keluar. Anda tahu, kandidat yang menang akan mulai menyusun kabinetnya, strukturnya. Nah, itulah bagian di mana kadang-kadang mereka akan mempekerjakan orang-orang dari partai yang kalah, atau kandidat yang kalah seperti itu sebenarnya cukup umum lagi, karena negara ini masih sangat muda, masih baru, apa, 26 tahun demokrasi elektoral dan juga sangat muda dalam hal PDB per kapita, kami masih di bawah $ 5.000 PDB per kapita, jadi hampir seperti banyak orang menyadari bahwa kami tidak memiliki banyak ruang untuk bermain-main dan menjadi sangat terpolarisasi karena kami tidak mampu, seperti kami benar-benar perlu melakukan banyak pekerjaan.

Kita masih memiliki banyak infrastruktur yang harus dibangun. Kita masih memiliki banyak investasi asing yang harus ditarik. Kita masih memiliki banyak pekerjaan rumah yang harus diselesaikan. Jadi, seringkali, yang terjadi adalah kandidat yang kalah atau partai yang kalah akan terserap dalam pemerintahan. Itulah sebabnya, terkadang salah satu kritik terbesar terhadap politik Indonesia adalah, jika Anda melihatnya dari sudut pandang partai, tidak benar bahwa sebuah partai akan memiliki konsep atau nilai yang sama selama 50 tahun. Mereka mungkin akan berubah seiring berjalannya waktu karena sekali lagi, partai-partai tersebut juga masih sangat muda. Jadi, bukan berarti partai ini sudah ada selama 130 tahun. Partai ini mungkin baru berdiri selama 20 tahun. Dan karena partai ini sudah ada selama 20 tahun, terkadang mereka mungkin harus bergeser, atau mereka mungkin harus mengubah pandangan mereka sesuai dengan konteksnya, dan juga sesuai dengan pasar yang mereka tarik.

Mungkin mereka akhirnya menarik lebih banyak generasi milenial, atau Gen Z, di mana mereka mulai harus mengubah cara pandang mereka terhadap beberapa jenis kebijakan tertentu, atau mungkin ekonomi Anda berubah dan konteks Anda berubah, bahkan pertanyaan-pertanyaan mengenai kesetaraan, bukan? Hal tersebut berubah seiring berjalannya waktu. Jadi, itulah mengapa ketika orang melihat partai politik di Indonesia, mereka sering kali berpikir, Oh, kenapa partai ini tidak dikenal karena satu hal dan hanya satu hal saja dan tidak berubah dan saya pikir, mungkin karena partai ini sudah ada selama 20 tahun. Mungkin karena partai ini juga masih berusaha menemukan jati dirinya, karena masih berusaha mencari tahu apa yang seharusnya diperjuangkan, dan itu adalah hal yang wajar. Dan saya rasa itulah salah satu keuntungan dari tahun pemilu di Indonesia, saya melihat lebih banyak kolaborasi yang terjadi, biasanya setelah pemilu, dibandingkan dengan negara-negara demokrasi lain yang lebih mapan.

(18:34) Jeremy Au:

Anda tadi menyebutkan Gen Z, kan? Dan tentu saja semua orang menyukai Gen Z. Saya hanya ingin tahu, jadi ketika Anda melihat Gen Z, seperti apa Gen Z di Indonesia dalam hal, Anda tahu, isu-isu apa yang mereka pedulikan? Bagaimana cara mereka mengonsumsi berita? Bagaimana mereka membuat keputusan? Karena menurut saya, sebagian besar media publik lebih banyak membahas tentang Gen Z di Amerika dan bagaimana mereka mengambil keputusan. Saya jadi penasaran, seperti apa di Indonesia?

(18:53) Gita Sjahrir:

Saya rasa perbedaan besar yang saya lihat dalam politik di Indonesia adalah banyaknya anak muda yang terlibat di dalamnya. Tidak hanya dari perspektif akar rumput, tapi sampai ke legislasi, sampai ke kementerian. Kita memiliki banyak sekali anak muda. Dan sekali lagi, bagian dari keuntungan menjadi negara demokrasi yang masih sangat muda, Anda juga membutuhkan orang-orang. Kami adalah negara demokrasi yang masih muda. Kami juga merupakan negara berkembang. Jadi kami membutuhkan orang-orang di kedua tempat tersebut. Dan yang cenderung terjadi adalah kadang-kadang, ketika kaum muda merasa bahwa mereka telah memaksimalkan pertumbuhan mereka di sektor swasta, mereka menjadi sangat tertarik untuk bekerja di sektor publik. Jadi saya tahu banyak anak muda yang bekerja di sektor publik, mungkin juga di kepengurusan partai politik atau bahkan di organisasi akar rumput. Saya mengenal banyak aktivis Gen Z dan mereka melakukan pekerjaan yang luar biasa di Indonesia karena Gen Z juga merupakan persentase yang sangat besar di negara ini. Jadi seperti apa? Sekitar 40 persen di bawah 35 tahun.

(19:49) Jeremy Au:

Tapi itu sangat besar. Semua orang adalah Gen Z. Siapa yang peduli dengan generasi milenial?

(19:52) Gita Sjahrir:

Seperti sangat besar. Sangat besar. Maksud saya, jumlahnya sangat banyak, saya tidak tahu, jangan mengutip saya untuk itu, mungkin cek dulu, tapi saya rasa sekitar 40-an persen.

(20:03) Gita Sjahrir:

Jumlah yang sangat besar, dan di banyak tempat, mungkin mereka melihatnya sebagai pemilih potensial yang harus mereka tarik, bukan? Ya, di Indonesia mungkin mereka melihat hal yang sama, tapi perbedaannya adalah mereka juga terjun ke dunia politik. Mereka juga akhirnya bekerja di sektor publik.

(20:16) Jeremy Au:

Menarik.

(20:17) Gita Sjahrir:

Mereka benar-benar melakukan sesuatu. Mereka sangat aktif dan sangat idealis, dan itu adalah hal yang bagus. Seringkali, orang melihat idealisme sebagai hal yang negatif karena Anda harus realistis, tapi sekali lagi, Gen Z mengingatkan kita bahwa Anda tidak dapat mengubah apapun jika Anda selalu realistis, seperti Anda harus bermimpi lebih besar.

(20:35) Jeremy Au:

Ya.

(20:36) Gita Sjahrir:

Buatlah hal-hal yang lebih besar dan lebih hebat. Mereka benar, dan di Indonesia, beberapa hal besar yang didorong oleh Gen Z adalah isu-isu mengenai lingkungan, yang menurut saya, sudah sangat tepat waktu, saya pikir kita perlu berubah seperti sekitar 50 tahun yang lalu, tapi di sinilah mereka, berjuang. Mereka banyak bertanya tentang ketidaksetaraan, yang, ya, sebagai negara berkembang, hal tersebut merupakan sesuatu yang harus kita waspadai, karena saya juga tidak tahu seberapa sehatnya tatanan sosial sebuah negara jika ketidaksetaraan begitu besar sehingga jutaan orang kesulitan mendapatkan uang untuk perawatan kesehatan dan kondisi kesehatan kronis mereka.

Dan kemudian, sejumlah besar orang hanya memiliki 50% kekayaan. Saya rasa hal itu mungkin bukan pertanda yang baik bagi negara ini. Mereka akan mengalami banyak keresahan. Mereka akan memiliki banyak ketidakpercayaan yang mendalam terhadap sistem, yang mana, apakah Anda yakin Anda ingin memiliki hal tersebut jika Anda adalah negara demokrasi, bukan? Dan saya pikir itu adalah sesuatu yang benar-benar dilakukan oleh Gen Z ini, mereka tidak hanya berbicara, tetapi mereka benar-benar melakukannya, terus-menerus membawanya dalam percakapan dan wacana, termasuk di sektor swasta. Mereka aktif di Kadin. Sebenarnya, mereka aktif di banyak jaringan pengusaha dan organisasi nasional lainnya, dan mereka benar-benar mendorong dan melobi untuk masalah-masalah ini, dan ini sangat bagus.

Terkadang di Indonesia, ketika kita membuat kebijakan nasional, secara logika mungkin terlihat bahwa membangun infrastruktur adalah hal yang tepat untuk dilakukan. Maksud saya, tidak ada yang akan membantah Anda tentang hal itu. Itu adalah hal yang baik, namun ada baiknya juga jika ada suara Gen Z di dalamnya untuk memberi kita check and balance dan bertanya, hei, apakah hal itu benar dari segi lingkungan? Apakah Anda melakukan yang terbaik yang Anda bisa untuk lingkungan saat Anda mengejar proyek ini? Atau, hei, apakah Anda melanggar hak-hak masyarakat adat? Apakah Anda memberi mereka manfaat untuk benar-benar mendapatkan dampak positif dari proyek ini, dan hal seperti itulah yang diinginkan oleh Gen Z, tidak hanya pemilih, tetapi juga aktivis, penyelenggara, afiliasi partai politik, itulah yang telah mereka berikan kepada kita dan kontribusikan kepada negara.

(22:38) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Dan yang menarik adalah apa yang mendefinisikan Gen Z, tentu saja, bukan hanya, masa muda mereka, yang berarti mereka memiliki mimpi-mimpi ini dan mereka tidak sinis atau mungkin seperti generasi milenial, meskipun itu seperti, Anda tahu, tetapi juga bagian lainnya adalah mereka tumbuh di era internet, kan?

Jadi mereka selalu memiliki internet sejak kecil dan internet seluler, yang berbeda dengan dial up, yang untuk generasi milenial. Dan saya pikir hal-hal besar yang orang akan, saya pikir dengan santai akan mengatakan akan seperti, video berdurasi pendek sangat penting.

(23:01) Jeremy Au:

Ulasan dan dukungan rekan kerja sangat penting, jejaring sosial, WhatsApp, bukan Facebook, misalnya, itu adalah hal-hal yang secara stereotip dikatakan, misalnya, deskripsi pemilih Gen Z di AS dalam hal diet informasi, bagaimana Anda melihatnya untuk Indonesia?

(23:17) Gita Sjahrir:

Sangat mirip. Jadi, menurut saya salah satu hal yang benar-benar dipelopori oleh Gen Z di Indonesia adalah penyebaran informasi dalam bentuk yang sangat menghibur, dan mereka sangat proaktif dalam hal ini. Jadi saya akan memberikan mereka alat peraga yang luar biasa untuk hal ini. Dan, di Indonesia, yang sangat saya perhatikan adalah, bahkan Gen Z yang tidak mengerti politik pada awalnya, mereka mencoba mencari cara untuk memahaminya. Banyak orang yang memberikan solusi untuk hal tersebut, dan itu luar biasa. Omong-omong, saya bukan investor, saya juga bukan siapa-siapa di perusahaan ini.

(23:52) Gita Sjahrir:

Tapi, Anda tahu, beberapa platform yang saya tahu telah melakukan pekerjaan yang baik dalam memberikan informasi kepada masyarakat adalah bijakmemilih.id, dan juga 'Ada apa dengan Indonesia?", di mana mereka mengemas informasi mengenai politik Indonesia dengan cara yang dapat dimengerti oleh anak-anak muda, dicerna, dan juga melibatkan nuansa di dalamnya. Karena seringkali ketika kita berbicara mengenai politik, sangat mudah untuk terjebak dalam percakapan biner hitam atau putih, baik atau buruk, benar atau salah. Dan apa yang telah dilakukan oleh gerakan Gen Z yang saya lihat di Indonesia adalah merebut hal tersebut dan menjadikannya milik mereka, bukan?

Sebenarnya ini adalah sebuah nuansa yang sangat berbeda, dan ini sangat berbeda karena hal ini, karena sejarah kita, karena konstitusi kita, rekam jejak kita, semuanya. Dan itu adalah sesuatu yang membuat saya sangat bangga melihatnya karena saya pikir sering kali di negara-negara yang semakin kaya atau semakin modern, terkadang ada pandangan apatis terhadap politik. Ada anggapan, oh, saya tidak perlu peduli dengan hal itu. Tidak masalah bagi saya, terutama ketika saya masih muda, saya akan mengatakan bahwa bagi sebagian besar dari kita, kita semua hanya berpikir, oh, bagaimana saya bisa mengubah apa pun?

(24:56) Gita Sjahrir:

Jadi, sangat menyenangkan melihat generasi setelah saya menjadi jauh lebih proaktif, jauh lebih kreatif, membuat semua video berdurasi pendek dalam platform yang sangat informatif, dan juga memiliki banyak akses ke informasi ini. Jadi, Anda tidak ingin melihat kami di laptop Anda? Buka saja TikTok. Anda tidak ingin membuka TikTok? Inilah kami di Instagram. Anda tidak ingin menggunakan Instagram? Ini cara lain untuk mengakses informasi kami. Jadi menurut saya, hal ini sangat besar. Dan karena negara kita terus berkembang, mereka tidak bisa mengabaikan kemajuan. Anda harus bermain game dengan orang lain. Anda harus ada di berbagai saluran media sosial yang berbeda. Anda harus belajar untuk membuat konten dalam potongan-potongan kecil, seperti Anda tidak bisa membuat brosur yang panjangnya 20 halaman lagi. Anda harus membuat hal-hal yang relevan untuk pasar Anda.

(25:46) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya sedang berjalan-jalan di sekitar D.C. dan kami pergi ke Roosevelt Memorial Perang Dunia II dan FDR. Dan, ada sebuah patung FDR yang sedang berbicara secara efektif melalui radio kepada seseorang yang sedang mendengarkannya di rumah. Dan teman saya yang menjadi pemandu wisata. Ya. Dan saya berkata seperti, Oh, Anda tahu, FDR adalah penguasa media komunikasi baru yang disebut radio.

Baiklah. Dan dia memenangkan hak itu. Dan kemudian, ya. Dia seperti, Anda tahu, dan Anda baru saja mengingatkan saya akan hal itu karena apa yang saya katakan dengan Fian seperti, saya berkata, hei, Anda tahu, JFK, Anda tahu, penguasa media baru yang disebut televisi, kan? Dia terlihat bagus di televisi. Dia berbicara dengan baik. Dan kemudian Anda bisa mengatakan bahwa Trump adalah penguasa Twitter. Jadi begitulah. Dan kemudian, apa yang dia ingatkan kepada saya adalah seperti, siapa yang akan menjadi penguasa video berdurasi pendek, TikTok atau YouTube, video pendek atau Instagram Reels. Maksud saya, formatnya sama saja, kan? 30 detik. Ini adalah revolusi media informasi yang nyata, seperti yang Anda katakan, bukan? Dan siapa pun yang menguasainya akan menjadi yang teratas.

(26:41) Gita Sjahrir:

Tepat sekali. Ya, saya pikir juga ada banyak ketakutan bahwa jika kita hanya melakukan media yang pendek-pendek saja, maka orang tidak akan masuk ke percakapan yang lebih dalam, seperti, maksud saya, ya, ada risiko itu. Tentu saja. Dan tentu saja, ada risiko bahwa, Anda tahu, dengan berkembangnya AI, maka pemalsuan mendalam yang akan datang akan semakin mudah. Dan hal ini memang membuatnya lebih mudah untuk membuat video berdurasi pendek dengan banyak informasi yang salah.

Saya kira saya menanggapinya dengan pengertian bahwa seperti yang Anda katakan, bukan berarti orang tidak melakukan hal itu sebelumnya. Bukan berarti radio tidak dapat digunakan untuk memberikan informasi yang salah pada masa itu. Bukan berarti bahwa ketika televisi muncul dan menjadi hal yang baru di televisi sebagai media, televisi juga tidak digunakan dengan cara yang merugikan kandidat lain. Hal seperti itu akan selalu ada, apapun media Anda. Jadi saya pikir ini lebih kepada, bagaimana kita menemukan perlindungan untuk terus menciptakan informasi baru yang bermanfaat dan informatif, bukan? Seperti, bagaimana Anda melakukannya dalam bentuk yang akan berarti bagi masa depan kita? Karena Anda tidak bisa tidak berkembang.

Seperti, Anda tidak bisa berhenti di situ dan berkata, saya tahu itu besar, tapi saya tidak akan pernah masuk ke sana karena itu bukan pasar Anda. Dan lagi, sebagai seseorang yang sangat menyukai kesesuaian pasar produk, saya rasa saya sering mengatakannya. Saya seperti, bung, apakah Anda memiliki product market fit? Kesesuaian pasar produk ada untuk semua orang termasuk politik. Siapa pasar Anda? Siapa konstituen Anda? Siapa pemangku kepentingan Anda? Siapa yang peduli dengan Anda, bukan? Dan itu berlaku untuk hampir semua hal dan semua orang, sektor swasta dan publik.

Jeremy Au:

Ya, luar biasa. Untuk itu, saya ingin meringkas tiga hal penting yang saya dapatkan dari percakapan ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih telah berbagi tentang, refleksi 2023 kami tentang apa artinya menjadi bijaksana dan, memikirkan dasar-dasar dalam hal bisnis, tetapi juga dalam hal tata kelola, juga dalam hal model bisnis.

Kedua, terima kasih telah memandu kami melalui pemilu di Indonesia dan saya rasa tidak hanya prosesnya, tetapi juga memikirkan, saya rasa, sejarahnya, fakta bahwa Indonesia masih merupakan negara demokrasi yang masih muda dan fakta bahwa, pemilu kali ini, kampanyenya sudah selangkah lebih baik daripada pemilu sebelumnya, serta memandu kami melalui, seperti proses pasca pemilu di mana negosiasi-negosiasi terjadi dan ada integrasi dari berbagai sudut pandang. Saya rasa ini sangat menggembirakan.

Terakhir, terima kasih telah berbagi tentang generasi Gen Z di Indonesia, dan tidak hanya dalam hal media komunikasi dan kebiasaan mereka, tetapi juga bagaimana mereka mirip dengan beberapa tren yang kita lihat di seluruh pemilih Gen Z di seluruh dunia. Selain itu, saya rasa ada perbedaan spesifik mengenai bagaimana mereka juga bersedia menjadi bagian dari pelayanan publik. Untuk itu, terima kasih banyak, Gita.

(29:13) Gita Sjahrir:

Terima kasih banyak.

 

Related links: