Vietnam: US & China "Love Triangle," 2023 GDP Growth Underperformance & 2024 Economy Forecast with Valerie Vu - E374

· VC and Angels,Vietnam,USA,China,Podcast Episodes

 

“It's the evolution of ‘Made in Vietnam’ to ‘Make in Vietnam’. I don't know how many steps it takes to make that happen but it definitely requires learning from more developed ecosystems, such as the US. So I would assume that we would invest in more sectors besides education. We would invest more in technology learning, and AI applications, and we're going to push for more digital transformation for enterprises.” - Valerie Vu

“I don't agree with the all-in tagline because we can’t choose either party entirely, given our geographic location. China is very important to us. And for the US, ever since we reopened our economic partnership, it helped tremendously with our economic growth because the largest buyers of the Made-in-Vietnam products are from the US. Let's just be friends and do business with everyone rather than having to choose one side over another.” - Valerie Vu 

“It seems like semiconductors will be the next frontier for Vietnam's economic growth. We still need a lot of qualified engineers to be able to accommodate all of the FDI, especially in the semiconductor chain moving to Vietnam. So I'm hoping that startups in Vietnam can catch that wave and help with our productivity growth, increasing more digital businesses to thrive in Vietnam because, our goal is to make the digital economy constitute at least 30% of our GDP. Whereas right now, it's about 10%. So, our room for growth is still huge. I'm more excited about the startup that targets productivity and increasing labor skill set in Vietnam.” - Valerie Vu

Valerie Vu, Founding Partner of Ansible Ventures, and Jeremy Au talked about three main topics:

1. 2023 Vietnam GDP Growth Underperformance: Valerie Vu reflected on the challenges faced by Vietnam’s economy in 2023, including 2023's GDP growth of 5.1% being lower than the government target of 6.5%. They discussed root causes such as the global economic slowdown, slowing imports, US interest rates, inflation, Vietnam's domestic anti-corruption campaign, and intertwined local real estate turmoil and credit crunch.

2. 2024 Vietnam Economy Forecast: Valerie shared her optimistic outlook for Vietnam's economy in 2024 with her expectation that the government will implement stimulus measures and improve policies to achieve a 6 to 6.5% GDP growth target. She believes that this is driven by the upcoming 2026 14th National Congress as well as the the continued shift from traditional industries to technology-intensive sectors, particularly semiconductors and software. She also emphasized Vietnam's transition from 'Made in Vietnam' to 'Make in Vietnam', signifying a new industrial policy push to move up the production value chain (as Singapore had done in the 1970s).

3. US & China "Love Triangle": They discussed President Joe Biden and President Xi Jinping's 2023 diplomatic visits to Vietnam and how Western and Chinese media portrayed Vietnam's relationship with US and China. Valerie shared how the Vietnam government is focused on technology deals with the US, and infrastructure with China - and which country they are most aligned with.

Jeremy and Valerie also discussed the role of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the economy, Vietnamese youth’s passion for entrepreneurship, and the significance of educational reforms in fostering innovation.

Supported by Hive Health

Are you expanding or launching a business in the Philippines? Ensuring your employees' good health is key to attracting and retaining top talent. That's where Hive Health comes in, especially for startups and small to medium-sized businesses. They specialize in providing top-quality and hassle-free healthcare plans tailored to your workplace. Learn more at www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:34) Valerie Vu:

Hey, Jeremy happy new year and hope you had a good break. And yeah, I'm excited to return to the show. Personally, I took a break as well. So I'm excited to discuss what's ahead for Vietnam.

(01:44) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And so, before we talk about what's in the future, we have to talk about what happened over the last 2023, right? What are the biggest developments that we had? And also that encompasses a lot of stuff that actually happened in November and December that we didn't get to discuss because both of us were busy taking a holiday. So, Valerie, what would you say are the big things that you think happened in 2023?

(02:03) Valerie Vu:

Yeah, I would like to conclude with a positive note. So I would talk about the not so positive note first. So 2023 was a bit challenging year for Vietnam, especially with headwinds from global economic uncertainties the anti-corruption campaign that's swiped a lot of real estate companies and projects in the market. Regardless, we still have positive growth of 5.05%, which is good, but it's below our government and national assembly target. So the national assembly target for last year was 6. So, it's not ideal that we did not meet the growth expectation. But if you look at the whole ASEAN region and all the developing countries it's still a very positive signal and positive growth. And Vietnam attracted really a strong FDI capital growth in 2023 reaching more than 36 billion which is a 32% year-on-year growth coming from more than a hundred different countries and territories. And then I think another really strong standing point is we are moving forward with establishing strong external relations. So, we welcomed President Biden in September and established a comprehensive partnership with the US, and then a few months later back in December, we also welcomed President Xi Jinping. And then he also promised more partnerships and also more infrastructure development and investment in Vietnam. So it's really showing how we are putting ourselves as a very important country in the region. So even though we had a lot of challenges and we did not meet our growth expectation of 2023 I'm so looking forward to 2024 when our government is having a target growth of between 6 to 6.5%, and really increases our GDP per capita to 4700 USD.

And also, the government has a really strong target of increasing the contribution of manufacturing and processing to our GDP, increasing our average productivity growth. They are also aiming to reduce the agricultural workforce. So really aggressive in moving to the goal of making Vietnam to be a developed country in the future. So, yeah, that's what the government is putting ahead for 2024.

(04:13) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, that's amazing. Sounds like there's two major parameters that we're talking about. One is, I think, the actual economy versus the economy that the government has been planning for. And the second, like you said, is the kind of global, regional dynamics where, you know, the relationships with the U. S. and China are big parts of it, as well as the FDI in terms of investment flows. I guess for the U. S. China Vietnam one is probably what's all over the news. I mean, it was like the Biden trip and the Xi Jinping trip. And I was reading it and I was like, no, this is like those Korean drama love triangle dynamic where Vietnam is being wooed by two different guys.

(04:47) Valerie Vu: Yeah, but like the industry that we are establishing the relationship with each country is quite different. So, for the US we are asking for more like investment into the semiconductor in high technology and manufacturing industry. And for China I think it's more leaning toward like infrastructure. Like road train development, given how China has been putting up for the Silk Road development. So they promised to help us build more like public, transportation road, train, et cetera. So very different kind of targets here.

(05:20) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, I think it's interesting because, you read the headlines very much like, okay, President Biden visit, okay, Vietnam is all in on America. Then you read the Chinese headlines. It looks like Vietnam. Oh, no, it's going all in on China. And I'm like, Hey, I think Vietnam's is looking to take care of Vietnam's interest first, and is neutral slash, taking you benefit of the situation to maximize what they can, right? So I don't think there's a specific, I don't know what's the word, binary, are you in or out kind of dynamic that a lot of the headlines are pushing for.

(05:47) Valerie Vu:

Yeah, I don't agree with the all-in kind of tagline either because we cannot choose either party entirely given our geographic location. China is very important for us. If you look back in history, they helped a lot in the Vietnam War. And also for the US, ever since we reopened our economic partnership, it also helped with our economic growth because most of the made-in-Vietnam products, the largest buyers are from the US. So it's hard to say we can go all in on anyone. I think it's let's just be friends and kind of do business with everyone rather than having to choose one side over another.

(06:27) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, I mean, I think most countries in ASEAN and Southeast Asia have that mentality. It's just that the headlines are all, it's very boring if you wrote that headline, right? Which is like, hey, let's all be friends and trade and make money together. I just think that the headlines are very like, I think they have this interest in making like a seesaw mentality, which is, okay, this half the year is US. Okay, the other half of the year, clearly Vietnam is China. And then there's a bit of a seesaw dynamic, which is. I think good for headlines. But as someone from Southeast Asia, I'm like it's a bit too sensationalist about it as well.

(06:55) Valerie Vu:

Yeah.

(06:56) Jeremy Au:

I think what's interesting, of course, is that you mentioned that Vietnam is looking to maximize the benefits to the economy from both the US and from China. And I think we talked about the other side, which is that the economy was underperforming versus government expectations.

And, you know, when I was visiting a couple of times in Vietnam, you and I were hanging out once and I was asking you about, hey, we were in this prime district and we saw quite a few shops that were closed. And I was kind of curious what's going on because if you have this belief as a very hot economy, you won't see so many shops like closed or shuttered. So could you share a little bit more, Valerie, about what happened in 2023 for that?

(07:25) Valerie Vu:

Yeah. So I would account that mostly for the decrease in the export because there's like a huge plunge in made-in Vietnam products from a country like the US or Europe. And also the effect of the anti-corruption campaign. So anti-corruption campaign touches a lot on fast-growing industries and have high value industries such as real estate so people Immediately lost like a lot of their income or jobs that were mostly tagged by the real estate so immediately they have to correct their spending and also like their mindset, uh, spending behavior.

So that's why I think consumer in Vietnam went through a major correction last year, tightened their budget. And that's why a lot of street shop house consumer-facing shop have to close down. And that's why you saw a lot of empty shops in the most expensive real estate piece in Vietnam last year. That's the two largest reasons why.

(08:21) Jeremy Au:

And so I think this is actually a good transition which is that, what do we think the economy is going to happen? What do you think we are going to see in 2024 from your perspective?

(08:29) Valerie Vu:

Yeah, in 2024 National Assembly, like I mentioned, have a target of GDP growth of 6 to 6. 5%. And to do this, we need to do more quantitative easing, kind of relax more credit to SMEs. So that's what I'm expecting for this year, more credit given to SMEs, to business owners. That's the only way to fill the role to their target of six to 6. 5%. And also kind of the government has been really encouraged the growth of digital economy. Changing the mindset from made in Vietnam to make in Vietnam. It sounds like not too much difference, but the make in Vietnam, meaning like we own the technology. And we kind of pivot from lower value products such as textile or garments industry to more software and also semiconductors. And hardware kind of elements, electronics et cetera in the economy. So, the Ministry of Science and Technology and also the Ministry of Information and Communication have been really I guess pushing for the agenda of having more make-in Vietnam products. And I guess that's why the largest technology corporation in Vietnam, FPT Corp has been also investing in US tech startups so that they can learn the technology from US and bring it back to Vietnam. So yeah they invested in Landing.Ai found founded by Andrew Ng. And I think that's a really strategic investment because FPT software, their largest revenue is mostly from like, outsourcing, but they want to move up from outsourcing and bringing more deep technology into Vietnam and fuel the dream of make in Vietnam products to happen.

(10:05) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, I think that's a really great assessment there because there's an interesting part where everybody in Southeast Asia is trying to move up the value chain. Singapore is where it is because he also was moving out of the value chain. I mean, Singapore also used to have a made-in-Singapore story, and then they also transitioned to try to make more in Singapore. So try to move up in terms of the capital assets and the manufacturing and the technology needed. I'm so curious because you mentioned a forecast that the government has had. Are you optimistic? Are you pessimistic about the economy, you know, exceeding or falling short of that target?

(10:36) Valerie Vu:

So I'm always an optimistic person. So I think we will meet the target. But 2024, in general, I think it's still going to be a challenging year but the recovery is coming on this way because. We have a major national Congress meeting in Q1, 2025. And a lot of economic simulation will come into support for the economy. So in order for that meeting in Q1 2025 to be successful, 2024, we have to show our major progress. So I'm positive that in 2024, we will be able to meet the National Assembly target growth of six to 6.5%.

(11:14) Jeremy Au:

I'm curious about what are the implications of the 2025 Congress. For example in China, to some extent, obviously there's a succession dynamic as well, but also it changes some of the economic decisions about which industries to favor or prioritize versus industries to de-prioritize, right? So I think we saw that, for example, in China, their Congress effectively years ago has caused the deprioritization of real estate, right? And the prioritization of domestic consumption as the new engine. And a deprioritization of some big tech companies as well as education tech. But a prioritization of semiconductor and hardware and manufacturing and electric vehicles. So I'm curious, as you look down, the next few years, what do you think are some implications of the Congress, or which directions it could potentially go based on the Congress?

(11:59) Valerie Vu:

Yeah. So we actually take a lot of learning from China. And that's why we did a major anti-corruption campaign in the real estate sector. So we definitely de-prioritize real estate and correct the value of real estate to what it should be. In terms of de-prioritization, I don't think consumer and edtech would be the ones. Just because we are still very in like nascent stage of having our own and strong consumer industry, as well as education. Vietnamese, as we mentioned in the previous episode, really prioritize for education. And we still send a lot of international students to countries like US, Australia, Canada every year. So definitely not those two industry. But obviously real estate.

What are we prioritizing? I think definitely EV. If you read the news watch the news past few days actually the founder and chairman of Vingroup actually became VinFast CEO. Previously, the CEO was Miss Madam Thuy. But now, the founder actually came in and became the CEO. So really show his commitment and also given the size and the importance of Vingroup to Vietnam's economy, you can clearly see the government and also the corporate placing EV as one of the major industries for the country. So EV um, then next I would say, more digital economy, semiconductors. We have been in talk, and we invited NVIDIA founder and CEO Jensen Huang to Vietnam. He's kind of entertained the idea that, like, he would open a factory of a fab in Vietnam, but he also say the same thing to other neighboring countries such as Malaysia. So we don't know but we invited Jensen Huang to Vietnam for a reason. So I would say, like, semiconductors and I would say lastly, cloud computing. Vietnam aims to have more digital enterprises and even government agencies right now being forced to use cloud computing using internet data centers and yeah, Vietnam right now data center market is still very in its infancy. So the room for growth is still huge. A lot of corporate enterprises will have to invest in the data center, in cloud computing.

(14:07) Jeremy Au:

And what's interesting is that this was a question that was by a listener in our previous episode, the question about cloud computing. When you think about cloud computing, obviously there are two parts, right? One is the building of cloud centers, data storage, and facilities. And the other side, of course, is the adoption by businesses and government individuals for cloud computing. What are the factors in play for Vietnam?

(14:27) Valerie Vu: I think the factors right now is we have many local, mainly investment by local technology and telecom businesses that are investing and building new internet data centers. So the leaders of the country in this sector would be, you VNPT which is a state-owned enterprise. And then Viettel, another state-owned enterprise that focuses on telecommunication. And then a few, followed by some smaller private enterprises such as CMC Corporation. VNG, which you are also familiar with also has its own data center at a smaller scale compared to the state-owned enterprise one.

(15:02) Valerie Vu:

And there's a lot of talk between Google and Amazon AWS to actually build data centers in Vietnam in the future. This discussion has been going on for years that, in the future, if a foreign enterprise or foreign MNC like Amazon or Google, want to operate in Vietnam, they have to establish a data center within Vietnam, within the Vietnam lane. But that discussion has not been legalized yet. So there's no enforcement yet, but I know that Google and the AWS team are well aware, and they are planning for this. I think AWS is a bit ahead of Google in terms of moving and building a data center in Vietnam.

(15:41) Jeremy Au:

A lot of this has to do with this Chinese thing, right? Which is the US-China relationship kind of fracturing quite a bit. So, for example, the semiconductor China's busy building a semiconductor industry to have resilience. Vietnam is building a semiconductor industry because people are not trusting the Taiwan security of that supply of semiconductors. So they want to build in Vietnam. There's engineers, the US side but electric vehicles is quite interesting as well, because you can imagine that Vietnam is going to be competing with the Chinese manufacturers of EV as well. Is it more because it's happening because it's competition or is it happening more because there's actually synergies across the borders between Vietnam and China?

(16:17) Valerie Vu:

I would say more of a competition. In terms of synergy, there's definitely like synergy between like, because of how close we are with China but we don't have competitive advantage or moat in the industry. I would say most of the battery are owned by Chinese suppliers. So they own the suppliers and supply chain. battery is like more than 50% cost of making a electronic vehicle. So I don't, honestly, I don't think we really have a competitive advantage in the industry.

(16:47) Jeremy Au:

Gotcha. Yeah, because I think semiconductor has a competitive advantage called, US is willing to have a China plus one strategy. So there's a competitive strategic tailwind in that sense. Whereas I think for the the EV side, it feels like, so far the world seems like this is not a national security concern the same way. So it's a little bit more harmonious in terms of trade barriers and flows. But like you said, therefore, in that case, then I don't really see the competitive advantage of Vietnam. I think the way I think about it as well is that it's not only about being able to manufacture the battery but also being able to recycle and process the battery after it's used because if you're able to do that, then you can lower the cost of the vehicle away from the cost of the entire battery, like I said, over 50%, 60%. And you can actually transform it to the cost of the usage, so, you take the manufacturing cost minus the recycling and processing cost, that differential divided by 10, 000 charges is your cost of the vehicle, right?

So it is actually a huge competitive advantage because China can not only manufacture, but they can also process and recycle the battery because they had a processing side, right? So I think it's very hard for anybody in the world to compete with the Chinese battery chain.

(17:49) Valerie Vu:

Yeah, I agree. Yeah.

(17:50) Jeremy Au:

It's very difficult because I think Singapore is trying to build battery recycling but we don't do battery manufacturing. So without that, you don't have the whole flywheel. I think America is also trying to do more battery manufacturing because they actually have the raw minerals, but they don't have the ability to do the processing and recycling really afterwards because it's such a environmentally I wouldn't say taxing, but you need a lot of requirements to do so. And you need a lot of government support as well. So when you look at all of this, I'm just kind of curious. What are your hopes for the Vietnamese startup ecosystem?

(18:18) Valerie Vu:

Yeah. So it's because it seems like semiconductors will be the next frontier for Vietnam economic growth and what we discussed from a few episodes ago we still, like a lot of qualified engineers to be able to accommodate for all of the FDI and all of the, especially in like semiconductor chain moving to Vietnam. So I'm hoping that startup in Vietnam can catch that wave helping with our productivity growth helping with increasing more digital businesses to thrive in Vietnam because, our goal is to make digital economy constitute for at least like 30% of our GDP. Whereas right now, it's about 10%. So, our room for growth is still huge. So I would say that I'm more excited about the startup that target like the productivity and increasing labor skill set Vietnam.

(19:05) Jeremy Au:

I think for myself, I agree with you about education tech seems to be pretty hot still. Obviously, there was some education tech failures over the past few years. But I think there's still a big hunger by the middle class. So I think it's less about the demand side, but more about the supply side. Having issues like founders not really knowing how to scale that. Do the right unit economics, the right operational efficiency. For me, when I look at Vietnam, I think it's gonna be interesting because the semiconductor tailwind is actually quite essential as part of a value chain, if this push actually manages to sustain over a 10 or 20 year time frame. I think people don't really understand, but Singapore used to have actually a very strong silicon industry about 10 years to 20 years ago. And unfortunately, most of that hollowed out, right? And a lot of it went to Penang and Malaysia, but also frankly, most of it went to Taiwan and to China as well, because it's such a low cost of production place. So, I think if this push really allows Vietnam to have that 20-year timeframe. I think there's actually a lot of fundamental companies that should come out if you do silicon and semiconductor, like you can do, say, graphics cards with Jensen Huang and NVIDIA.

But actually there's a lot of compute data center companies. I think this is basically a value chain that you can really move up. And I don't think it's necessarily an investment thesis that can bear fruit today but I think it's actually a really interesting piece, which is, yeah, can you imagine Vietnam becoming the TSMC of the world. Then actually there's gonna be a very interesting evolution slash technology tree that will come out from it.

(20:25) Valerie Vu:

Yeah. It's definitely like the evolution of Made in Vietnam to Make in Vietnam. I honestly I don't know like how many step or how hard that is to make that happen but it definitely requires to learn from more developed ecosystems, such as the US. That's why equity, invested in lending AI. So I would assume that we would invest more Besides education. We would invest more in like technology learning, like AI application s among the industry and we're going to push for more digital transformation for enterprises. That's my hope for Vietnam in this year.

(20:59) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. I think a big mistake that Singapore did was that there was a, at a time, an assumption that engineers was not really a really good profession to advocate for in Singapore. And so one of the big decisions they made was like teaching engineering students about how to manage other engineers in, for example, countries like India or in the rest of the world. And so, I think without that deep tech, or you can say that fundamental understanding of hardware as well, then you don't get all the building blocks for the rest of the ecosystem and I don't know, I mean, like I'm not an expert on some of this stuff, but I think that if you look at Silicon Valley, it was called Silicon Valley because it started with Silicon, and then everything else got layered on top of it. A lot of the deep tech, a lot of the R& D, even chat GPT and open AI is very much based on a fundamental understanding of both hardware and software, right? And it's interesting to see that Singapore kind of gave up that lead in that sense on the hardware side to focus on software and more importantly focusing less on software engineers and focusing more on engineering managers, right?

So I think it makes sense from a population perspective. Maybe there's not enough density of engineers and so forth, but I think it's interesting to see that Vietnam side really take off. And I think that's why we see a lot of Singaporean engineering companies hiring a lot actually in Vietnam now. When I was in Vietnam, I was meeting a lot of the Singaporean companies that was just hiring like 10, 50, 100, 200 engineers in Vietnam. And they're supposed to work with Singapore HQ. But I think it's an interesting partnership, I would say.

(22:17) Valerie Vu:

Yeah. I think I'm not only Singaporean company building the tech team in Vietnam, right? There's some many like American companies, Australian company. They all realize how good software engineers or tech talents Vietnam is. So a lot of them actually have their, some of their tech team in Vietnam. So like Synopsis, Atlassian yeah, many more.

(22:36) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. I think it would be interesting because, I think that's where the flywheel is which is you have all these technical talent that's being trained now and speaking with a government agency in Singapore and I basically said, Hey, I don't have an issue with us outsourcing and having a great team in Vietnam but I think what would be interesting is, everybody who's a junior engineer in Vietnam, the next company is going to be a senior engineering manager leadership, right? And the next after that, they're going to become CEOs and co-founders after that, right? So honestly, only two, I don't know, what is it, talent cycles away from a new generation of Vietnamese startups that are highly technical and well trained. And I was like, I said, it's not competitive binary zero something between Singapore and Vietnam, but is this an interesting dynamic where these are the flows of capital and talent that we're seeing? So I think that I think there's good news for the Vietnamese ecosystem for sure. And I think also to some extent it's not replicated in the rest of Southeast Asia, so if you look at Indonesia or the Philippines or Thailand, I think the focus on engineering and the focus on training engineers and that talent pool and also combining that with people outsourcing that talent role for technical teams to work remotely. It's actually quite a unique combination for Vietnam.

(23:38) Valerie Vu:

Yeah. So before this recording, I was mentoring for a university incubation and yeah, that was my feedback as well. They had a good idea and kind of agenda of building a university incubation, but the agenda was more targeting into like the business students and I feel like they lack the incorporation of the technology engineering students which you might not know or heard of the university name before, but they are actually like top tier engineering university of Vietnam. So I'm just quite amazed. I'm still quite amazed by how passionate young people, young Vietnamese are with entrepreneurship and, they spend extra time outside of school, outside of their work to invest in this university incubation.

(24:23) Jeremy Au:

When you meet university students in Vietnam, what do you notice about them?

(24:27) Valerie Vu:

Yeah, so most of them are really curious really hungry. But some of the business students tend to hang out together and kind of forget about the technology, the stem, and the engineering students. So there's not a lot of cross-section between the non-business and the business student together. So I'm hoping that there will be more like hackathon between both business student and non-business students, but overall most of them are very curious and really want to like advance in their career planning. The only thing is right now, they are still attracted by big names, big consulting, big tech, or big banks name. But I think in the near future, the culture will change and they will be more attracted to like startups.

(25:07) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, hopefully so. I mean, I also teach entrepreneurship at the universities in Singapore, like National University of Singapore, Singapore Management University. One thing I would say is that, don't worry, the business students in Singapore also don't hang out with the engineers in Singapore.

(25:20) Valerie Vu:

Oh, really? Oh, I didn't know.

(25:22) Jeremy Au:

It's a common problem. I think it's just that business people are, you know,

(25:25) Valerie Vu: I think they should hang out. more. Yeah. They should hang out more with each other. Yeah.

(25:29) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And I think I would say that that's an interesting dynamic and hopefully we'll see more cross-pollination not only across different faculties like business and engineering, but also across different countries as well. On that note, I'd love to wrap things up and summarize the three big takeaways I got from this conversation.

First of all, I thought it was really fascinating to hear about the reflections on 2023. It was nice to hear about the underperformance of the Vietnamese economy versus the government target, as well as the love triangle between Vietnam, USA and China in terms of what it shows up in headlines versus what is actually the strategic incentives and imperatives for Vietnam.

Secondly, thanks for sharing about what you expect for 2024. I'm glad to hear about your optimism that there will be both stimulus and a focus on economy by policymakers in Vietnam on that. You do believe that there will be a very strong effort to hit the 6 to 6.5% GDP growth target.

And lastly, thanks for sharing some of the root causes that really driving this was nice to dive into the semiconductor side. Dive into infrastructure, dive into the educational outlook and spirit of the next generation. So looking forward to catch up with you next time.

(26:32) Valerie Vu:

Thank you, Jeremy. And looking forward for our next discussion.

Valerie Vu, Founding Partner Ansible Ventures, dan Jeremy Au membahas tiga topik utama:

1. Pertumbuhan PDB Vietnam 2023 di Bawah Target: Valerie Vu merefleksikan tantangan yang dihadapi oleh perekonomian Vietnam pada tahun 2023, termasuk pertumbuhan PDB 2023 sebesar 5,1% yang lebih rendah dari target pemerintah sebesar 6,5%. Mereka membahas akar penyebab seperti perlambatan ekonomi global, perlambatan impor, suku bunga AS, inflasi, kampanye anti-korupsi domestik Vietnam, dan gejolak real estat lokal yang saling terkait dan krisis kredit.

2. Prakiraan Ekonomi Vietnam 2024: Valerie membagikan pandangan optimisnya terhadap perekonomian Vietnam pada tahun 2024 dengan harapannya bahwa pemerintah akan mengimplementasikan langkah-langkah stimulus dan meningkatkan kebijakan untuk mencapai target pertumbuhan PDB sebesar 6 hingga 6,5%. Beliau percaya bahwa hal ini didorong oleh Kongres Nasional ke-14 tahun 2026 yang akan datang serta pergeseran yang terus berlanjut dari industri tradisional ke sektor padat teknologi, terutama semikonduktor dan perangkat lunak. Ia juga menekankan transisi Vietnam dari 'Made in Vietnam' menjadi 'Make in Vietnam', yang menandakan dorongan kebijakan industri baru untuk meningkatkan rantai nilai produksi (seperti yang dilakukan Singapura pada tahun 1970-an).

3. "Segitiga Cinta" AS & Tiongkok: Mereka membahas kunjungan diplomatik Presiden Joe Biden dan Presiden Xi Jinping pada tahun 2023 ke Vietnam dan bagaimana media Barat dan Tiongkok menggambarkan hubungan Vietnam dengan AS dan Tiongkok. Valerie berbagi tentang bagaimana pemerintah Vietnam berfokus pada kesepakatan teknologi dengan AS, dan infrastruktur dengan Tiongkok - dan negara mana yang paling mereka sukai.

Jeremy dan Valerie juga mendiskusikan peran investasi asing langsung (FDI) dalam perekonomian, semangat kaum muda Vietnam untuk berwirausaha, dan pentingnya reformasi pendidikan dalam mendorong inovasi.

(01:34) Valerie Vu:

Hei, Jeremy selamat tahun baru dan semoga liburan Anda menyenangkan. Dan ya, saya sangat bersemangat untuk kembali ke acara ini. Secara pribadi, saya juga beristirahat sejenak. Jadi saya bersemangat untuk membahas apa yang akan terjadi di Vietnam.

(01:44) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Jadi, sebelum kita berbicara tentang apa yang akan terjadi di masa depan, kita harus berbicara tentang apa yang terjadi pada tahun 2023 yang lalu, bukan? Apa saja perkembangan terbesar yang kami alami? Dan juga mencakup banyak hal yang sebenarnya terjadi di bulan November dan Desember yang tidak sempat kami bahas karena kami berdua sibuk berlibur. Jadi, Valerie, menurut Anda, apa saja hal-hal besar yang menurut Anda terjadi di tahun 2023?

(02:03) Valerie Vu:

Ya, saya ingin menyimpulkan dengan catatan positif. Jadi saya akan berbicara tentang catatan yang tidak begitu positif terlebih dahulu. Jadi tahun 2023 adalah tahun yang sedikit menantang bagi Vietnam, terutama dengan adanya ketidakpastian ekonomi global dan kampanye anti-korupsi yang menggeser banyak perusahaan dan proyek real estat di pasar. Terlepas dari itu, kami masih memiliki pertumbuhan positif sebesar 5,05%, yang mana ini bagus, tetapi masih di bawah target pemerintah dan majelis nasional. Jadi target DPR untuk tahun lalu adalah 6. Jadi, tidak ideal jika kami tidak memenuhi ekspektasi pertumbuhan. Tetapi jika Anda melihat seluruh kawasan ASEAN dan semua negara berkembang, ini masih merupakan sinyal yang sangat positif dan pertumbuhan yang positif. Dan Vietnam benar-benar menarik pertumbuhan modal FDI yang kuat pada tahun 2023 yang mencapai lebih dari 36 miliar yang merupakan pertumbuhan 32% dari tahun ke tahun yang berasal dari lebih dari seratus negara dan wilayah yang berbeda. Dan kemudian saya pikir poin lain yang sangat kuat adalah kami bergerak maju dengan membangun hubungan eksternal yang kuat. Jadi, kami menyambut Presiden Biden pada bulan September dan menjalin kemitraan komprehensif dengan AS, dan kemudian beberapa bulan kemudian di bulan Desember, kami juga menyambut Presiden Xi Jinping. Dan kemudian dia juga menjanjikan lebih banyak kemitraan dan juga lebih banyak pembangunan infrastruktur dan investasi di Vietnam. Jadi ini benar-benar menunjukkan bagaimana kami menempatkan diri kami sebagai negara yang sangat penting di kawasan ini. Jadi, meskipun kami memiliki banyak tantangan dan kami tidak memenuhi ekspektasi pertumbuhan kami di tahun 2023, saya sangat menantikan tahun 2024 ketika pemerintah kami memiliki target pertumbuhan antara 6 hingga 6,5%, dan benar-benar meningkatkan PDB per kapita kami menjadi 4700 USD.

Dan juga, pemerintah memiliki target yang sangat kuat untuk meningkatkan kontribusi manufaktur dan pengolahan terhadap PDB kita, meningkatkan pertumbuhan produktivitas rata-rata. Mereka juga bertujuan untuk mengurangi tenaga kerja pertanian. Jadi sangat agresif dalam bergerak menuju tujuan menjadikan Vietnam sebagai negara maju di masa depan. Jadi, ya, itulah yang diutamakan oleh pemerintah untuk tahun 2024.

(04:13) Jeremy Au:

Ya, itu luar biasa. Sepertinya ada dua parameter utama yang kita bicarakan. Salah satunya adalah, menurut saya, ekonomi aktual versus ekonomi yang telah direncanakan oleh pemerintah. Dan yang kedua, seperti yang Anda katakan, adalah jenis dinamika global dan regional di mana, Anda tahu, hubungan dengan AS dan Cina adalah bagian besar darinya, serta FDI dalam hal arus investasi. Saya kira untuk AS-Cina Vietnam mungkin yang paling banyak diberitakan. Maksud saya, ini seperti perjalanan Biden dan perjalanan Xi Jinping. Dan saya membacanya dan saya seperti, tidak, ini seperti dinamika cinta segitiga dalam drama Korea di mana Vietnam dirayu oleh dua orang yang berbeda.

(04:47) Valerie Vu: Ya, tapi seperti industri yang kami jalin, hubungan dengan masing-masing negara sangat berbeda. Jadi, untuk Amerika Serikat kami meminta lebih banyak investasi seperti investasi di bidang semikonduktor di industri teknologi tinggi dan manufaktur. Dan untuk Cina, saya rasa lebih condong ke arah infrastruktur. Seperti pembangunan kereta api, mengingat bagaimana Cina telah mempersiapkan pembangunan Jalur Sutra. Jadi mereka berjanji untuk membantu kami membangun lebih banyak lagi seperti jalan umum, transportasi, kereta api, dan lain-lain. Jadi sangat berbeda jenis targetnya di sini.

(05:20) Jeremy Au:

Ya, menurut saya ini menarik karena, Anda membaca berita utama seperti, oke, kunjungan Presiden Biden, oke, Vietnam sangat mendukung Amerika. Kemudian Anda membaca berita utama Tiongkok. Sepertinya Vietnam. Oh, tidak, itu semua tentang Cina. Dan saya seperti, Hei, saya pikir Vietnam ingin menjaga kepentingan Vietnam terlebih dahulu, dan bersikap netral, memanfaatkan situasi ini untuk memaksimalkan apa yang mereka bisa, bukan? Jadi saya rasa tidak ada, saya tidak tahu apa istilahnya, biner, apakah Anda masuk atau keluar dari jenis dinamika yang didorong oleh banyak berita utama.

(05:47) Valerie Vu:

Ya, saya juga tidak setuju dengan tagline all-in karena kami tidak dapat memilih salah satu pihak sepenuhnya mengingat lokasi geografis kami. Tiongkok sangat penting bagi kami. Dan juga bagi AS, sejak kami membuka kembali kemitraan ekonomi kami, hal ini juga sangat membantu pertumbuhan ekonomi kami karena sebagian besar produk buatan Vietnam, pembeli terbesarnya berasal dari AS. Jadi, sulit untuk mengatakan bahwa kami bisa menyerang siapa pun. Saya pikir, mari kita berteman dan berbisnis dengan semua orang daripada harus memilih satu pihak daripada yang lain.

(06:27) Jeremy Au:

Ya, maksud saya, saya rasa sebagian besar negara di ASEAN dan Asia Tenggara memiliki mentalitas seperti itu. Hanya saja, berita utamanya, sangat membosankan jika Anda menulis berita utama seperti itu, bukan? Seperti, hei, mari kita semua berteman dan berdagang dan menghasilkan uang bersama. Saya hanya berpikir bahwa berita utamanya sangat seperti, saya pikir mereka memiliki minat untuk membuat mentalitas jungkat-jungkit, yaitu, oke, setengah tahun ini adalah AS. Oke, setengah tahun berikutnya, jelas Vietnam adalah Cina. Dan kemudian ada sedikit dinamika jungkat-jungkit, yaitu. Saya pikir bagus untuk berita utama. Tapi sebagai seseorang dari Asia Tenggara, saya rasa ini agak terlalu sensasional juga.

(06:55) Valerie Vu:

Ya.

(06:56) Jeremy Au:

Saya pikir yang menarik, tentu saja, Anda menyebutkan bahwa Vietnam ingin memaksimalkan manfaat bagi perekonomiannya baik dari AS maupun dari Tiongkok. Dan saya rasa kita telah membicarakan sisi lain, yaitu bahwa perekonomiannya berkinerja buruk dibandingkan dengan ekspektasi pemerintah.

Dan, Anda tahu, ketika saya berkunjung beberapa kali ke Vietnam, Anda dan saya pernah nongkrong bersama dan saya bertanya kepada Anda tentang, hei, kami berada di distrik utama ini dan kami melihat beberapa toko yang tutup. Dan saya agak penasaran apa yang sedang terjadi karena jika Anda memiliki keyakinan bahwa ekonomi di sana sangat panas, Anda tidak akan melihat begitu banyak toko yang tutup atau tutup. Jadi bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak, Valerie, tentang apa yang terjadi pada tahun 2023 untuk itu?

(07:25) Valerie Vu:

Ya. Jadi saya akan menjelaskan sebagian besar penurunan ekspor karena ada penurunan besar dalam produk buatan Vietnam dari negara seperti Amerika Serikat atau Eropa. Dan juga efek dari kampanye anti-korupsi. Jadi kampanye anti-korupsi banyak menyentuh industri yang tumbuh cepat dan memiliki industri bernilai tinggi seperti real estat sehingga orang-orang langsung kehilangan banyak pendapatan atau pekerjaan mereka yang sebagian besar ditandai oleh real estat sehingga mereka harus segera memperbaiki pengeluaran mereka dan juga pola pikir mereka, eh, perilaku belanja.

Jadi itulah mengapa saya pikir konsumen di Vietnam mengalami koreksi besar tahun lalu, memperketat anggaran mereka. Dan itulah mengapa banyak ruko yang berhadapan langsung dengan konsumen harus tutup. Dan itulah mengapa Anda melihat banyak toko kosong di kawasan real estat termahal di Vietnam tahun lalu. Itulah dua alasan terbesarnya.

(08:21) Jeremy Au:

Jadi menurut saya, ini sebenarnya adalah transisi yang baik, yaitu, menurut kita, apa yang akan terjadi pada ekonomi? Menurut Anda, apa yang akan kita lihat pada tahun 2024 dari sudut pandang Anda?

(08:29) Valerie Vu:

Ya, pada tahun 2024, seperti yang saya sebutkan, DPR memiliki target pertumbuhan PDB sebesar 6 hingga 6,5%. Dan untuk mencapai hal tersebut, kita perlu melakukan lebih banyak pelonggaran kuantitatif, seperti melonggarkan lebih banyak kredit untuk UKM. Jadi itulah yang saya harapkan untuk tahun ini, lebih banyak kredit yang diberikan kepada UKM, kepada para pemilik bisnis. Itulah satu-satunya cara untuk memenuhi target pertumbuhan ekonomi mereka yang sebesar 6,5%. Dan juga pemerintah benar-benar mendorong pertumbuhan ekonomi digital. Mengubah pola pikir dari made in Vietnam menjadi make in Vietnam. Kedengarannya tidak terlalu banyak perbedaan, tetapi make in Vietnam, artinya kami memiliki teknologinya. Dan kami beralih dari produk bernilai rendah seperti industri tekstil atau garmen ke lebih banyak perangkat lunak dan juga semikonduktor. Dan elemen-elemen perangkat keras, elektronik dan sebagainya dalam perekonomian. Jadi, Kementerian Ilmu Pengetahuan dan Teknologi dan juga Kementerian Informasi dan Komunikasi telah benar-benar mendorong agenda untuk memiliki lebih banyak produk buatan Vietnam. Dan saya kira itulah sebabnya perusahaan teknologi terbesar di Vietnam, FPT Corp juga telah berinvestasi di perusahaan rintisan teknologi AS sehingga mereka dapat mempelajari teknologi dari AS dan membawanya kembali ke Vietnam. Jadi, ya, mereka berinvestasi di Landing.Ai yang didirikan oleh Andrew Ng. Dan menurut saya itu adalah investasi yang sangat strategis karena perangkat lunak FPT, pendapatan terbesar mereka sebagian besar berasal dari outsourcing, tetapi mereka ingin beralih dari outsourcing dan membawa teknologi yang lebih dalam ke Vietnam dan mendorong impian untuk mewujudkan produk buatan Vietnam.

(10:05) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya pikir itu adalah penilaian yang sangat bagus karena ada bagian yang menarik di mana semua orang di Asia Tenggara mencoba untuk meningkatkan rantai nilai. Singapura berada di posisi yang tepat karena dia juga bergerak keluar dari rantai nilai. Maksud saya, Singapura juga dulunya memiliki cerita tentang produk buatan Singapura, dan kemudian mereka juga beralih untuk mencoba membuat lebih banyak produk di Singapura. Jadi cobalah untuk bergerak naik dalam hal aset modal dan manufaktur serta teknologi yang dibutuhkan. Saya sangat penasaran karena Anda menyebutkan perkiraan yang dimiliki pemerintah. Apakah Anda optimis? Apakah Anda pesimis tentang ekonomi, Anda tahu, melebihi atau kurang dari target itu?

(10:36) Valerie Vu:

Jadi saya selalu menjadi orang yang optimis. Jadi saya pikir kami akan memenuhi target. Namun tahun 2024, secara umum, saya rasa masih akan menjadi tahun yang penuh tantangan, namun pemulihan akan terjadi dengan cara ini. Kami memiliki pertemuan Kongres nasional yang besar pada kuartal pertama tahun 2025. Dan banyak simulasi ekonomi yang akan mendukung perekonomian. Jadi agar pertemuan di Q1 2025 itu berhasil, 2024, kita harus menunjukkan kemajuan besar kita. Jadi saya yakin bahwa pada tahun 2024, kita akan dapat memenuhi target pertumbuhan Majelis Nasional sebesar enam hingga 6,5%.

(11:14) Jeremy Au:

Saya ingin tahu apa saja implikasi dari Kongres 2025. Sebagai contoh di Tiongkok, sampai batas tertentu, jelas ada dinamika suksesi juga, tetapi juga mengubah beberapa keputusan ekonomi tentang industri mana yang harus didukung atau diprioritaskan versus industri yang tidak perlu diprioritaskan, bukan? Jadi saya rasa kita telah melihat hal itu, misalnya, di Cina. Kongres mereka beberapa tahun yang lalu secara efektif telah menyebabkan deprioritasisasi real estat, bukan? Dan memprioritaskan konsumsi domestik sebagai mesin baru. Dan deprioritasisasi beberapa perusahaan teknologi besar serta teknologi pendidikan. Tetapi prioritas pada semikonduktor dan perangkat keras serta manufaktur dan kendaraan listrik. Jadi saya penasaran, ketika Anda melihat ke bawah, beberapa tahun ke depan, menurut Anda apa saja implikasi dari Kongres tersebut, atau ke arah mana potensi yang dapat dituju berdasarkan Kongres tersebut?

(11:59) Valerie Vu:

Ya. Jadi kami benar-benar mengambil banyak pelajaran dari Tiongkok. Dan itulah mengapa kami melakukan kampanye anti-korupsi besar-besaran di sektor real estat. Jadi kami benar-benar tidak memprioritaskan real estat dan mengoreksi nilai real estat seperti yang seharusnya. Dalam hal de-prioritasisasi, saya rasa bukan konsumen dan edtech yang menjadi prioritas. Hanya karena kita masih dalam tahap awal untuk memiliki industri konsumen yang kuat dan kuat, begitu juga dengan pendidikan. Orang Vietnam, seperti yang kami sebutkan di episode sebelumnya, sangat memprioritaskan pendidikan. Dan kami masih mengirimkan banyak pelajar internasional ke negara-negara seperti Amerika Serikat, Australia, Kanada setiap tahunnya. Jadi jelas bukan dua industri tersebut. Tapi jelas real estat.

Apa yang kami prioritaskan? Menurut saya tentu saja mobil listrik. Jika Anda membaca berita beberapa hari terakhir ini, sebenarnya pendiri dan chairman Vingroup telah menjadi CEO VinFast. Sebelumnya, CEO-nya adalah Nona Madam Thuy. Tapi sekarang, sang pendiri benar-benar masuk dan menjadi CEO. Jadi benar-benar menunjukkan komitmennya dan juga mengingat ukuran dan pentingnya Vingroup bagi perekonomian Vietnam, Anda dapat dengan jelas melihat pemerintah dan perusahaan menempatkan EV sebagai salah satu industri utama bagi negara. Jadi EV, lalu selanjutnya saya akan mengatakan, lebih banyak ekonomi digital, semikonduktor. Kami telah melakukan pembicaraan, dan kami mengundang pendiri dan CEO NVIDIA, Jensen Huang, ke Vietnam. Dia agak terhibur dengan ide bahwa, dia akan membuka pabrik di Vietnam, tetapi dia juga mengatakan hal yang sama ke negara tetangga lainnya seperti Malaysia. Jadi kami tidak tahu, tetapi kami mengundang Jensen Huang ke Vietnam karena suatu alasan. Jadi saya akan mengatakan, misalnya, semikonduktor dan yang terakhir, komputasi awan. Vietnam bertujuan untuk memiliki lebih banyak perusahaan digital dan bahkan lembaga pemerintah saat ini dipaksa untuk menggunakan komputasi awan dengan menggunakan pusat data internet dan ya, pasar pusat data Vietnam saat ini masih sangat baru. Jadi, ruang untuk pertumbuhan masih sangat besar. Banyak perusahaan korporat yang harus berinvestasi di pusat data, di komputasi awan.

(14:07) Jeremy Au:

Dan yang menarik adalah bahwa ini adalah pertanyaan dari seorang pendengar di episode kami sebelumnya, yaitu tentang komputasi awan. Ketika Anda berpikir tentang komputasi awan, tentu saja ada dua bagian, bukan? Salah satunya adalah pembangunan pusat-pusat cloud, penyimpanan data, dan fasilitasnya. Dan sisi lainnya, tentu saja, adalah adopsi oleh bisnis dan individu pemerintah untuk komputasi awan. Apa saja faktor yang berperan untuk Vietnam?

(14:27) Valerie Vu: Saya rasa faktornya saat ini adalah kita memiliki banyak investasi lokal, terutama investasi oleh bisnis teknologi dan telekomunikasi lokal yang berinvestasi dan membangun pusat data internet baru. Jadi, para pemimpin negara di sektor ini adalah VNPT yang merupakan perusahaan milik negara. Kemudian Viettel, perusahaan milik negara lain yang berfokus pada telekomunikasi. Dan kemudian beberapa, diikuti oleh beberapa perusahaan swasta yang lebih kecil seperti CMC Corporation. VNG, yang juga Anda kenal juga memiliki pusat datanya sendiri dalam skala yang lebih kecil dibandingkan dengan perusahaan milik negara.

(15:02) Valerie Vu:

Dan ada banyak pembicaraan antara Google dan Amazon AWS untuk benar-benar membangun pusat data di Vietnam di masa depan. Diskusi ini telah berlangsung selama bertahun-tahun bahwa, di masa depan, jika perusahaan asing atau MNC asing seperti Amazon atau Google, ingin beroperasi di Vietnam, mereka harus membangun pusat data di Vietnam, di dalam jalur Vietnam. Tetapi diskusi itu belum disahkan. Jadi belum ada penegakan hukum, tetapi saya tahu bahwa Google dan tim AWS sangat menyadari hal ini, dan mereka sedang merencanakannya. Menurut saya, AWS sedikit lebih maju daripada Google dalam hal pemindahan dan pembangunan pusat data di Vietnam.

(15:41) Jeremy Au:

Banyak dari hal ini berkaitan dengan masalah Cina ini, bukan? Yang mana hubungan AS-Cina agak sedikit retak. Jadi, misalnya, semikonduktor China sedang sibuk membangun industri semikonduktor untuk memiliki ketahanan. Vietnam membangun industri semikonduktor karena orang tidak percaya dengan keamanan Taiwan untuk pasokan semikonduktor tersebut. Jadi mereka ingin membangun di Vietnam. Ada insinyur, dari pihak AS, tetapi kendaraan listrik juga cukup menarik, karena Anda dapat membayangkan bahwa Vietnam akan bersaing dengan produsen mobil listrik China juga. Apakah hal ini terjadi lebih karena persaingan atau lebih karena adanya sinergi lintas batas antara Vietnam dan Cina?

(16:17) Valerie Vu:

Menurut saya, ini lebih merupakan sebuah kompetisi. Dalam hal sinergi, pasti ada sinergi antara yang sejenis, karena seberapa dekat kami dengan China tetapi kami tidak memiliki keunggulan kompetitif atau parit di industri ini. Menurut saya, sebagian besar baterai dimiliki oleh pemasok China. Jadi mereka memiliki pemasok dan rantai pasokan. Baterai adalah lebih dari 50% biaya pembuatan kendaraan elektronik. Jadi, sejujurnya, saya tidak merasa kita benar-benar memiliki keunggulan kompetitif di industri ini.

(16:47) Jeremy Au:

Kena kau. Ya, karena menurut saya semikonduktor memiliki keunggulan kompetitif yang disebut, AS bersedia memiliki strategi China plus satu. Jadi ada penarik strategis yang kompetitif dalam hal itu. Sedangkan saya pikir untuk sisi EV, rasanya, sejauh ini dunia sepertinya ini bukan masalah keamanan nasional dengan cara yang sama. Jadi sedikit lebih harmonis dalam hal hambatan dan arus perdagangan. Namun seperti yang Anda katakan, oleh karena itu, dalam hal ini, saya tidak benar-benar melihat keunggulan kompetitif Vietnam. Menurut saya, cara saya berpikir tentang hal ini adalah bahwa ini bukan hanya tentang kemampuan untuk memproduksi baterai tetapi juga kemampuan untuk mendaur ulang dan memproses baterai setelah digunakan, karena jika Anda dapat melakukannya, maka Anda dapat menurunkan biaya kendaraan dari biaya seluruh baterai, seperti yang saya katakan, lebih dari 50%, 60%. Dan Anda benar-benar dapat mengubahnya menjadi biaya penggunaan, jadi, Anda mengambil biaya produksi dikurangi biaya daur ulang dan pemrosesan, selisihnya dibagi 10.000 biaya adalah biaya kendaraan Anda, bukan?

Jadi, ini sebenarnya adalah keunggulan kompetitif yang sangat besar karena China tidak hanya dapat memproduksi, tetapi mereka juga dapat memproses dan mendaur ulang baterai karena mereka memiliki sisi pemrosesan, bukan? Jadi menurut saya, sangat sulit bagi siapa pun di dunia untuk bersaing dengan rantai baterai China.

(17:49) Valerie Vu:

Ya, aku setuju. Ya.

(17:50) Jeremy Au:

Ini sangat sulit karena menurut saya Singapura mencoba membangun daur ulang baterai, tetapi kami tidak membuat baterai. Jadi tanpa itu, Anda tidak akan memiliki roda gila secara keseluruhan. Saya pikir Amerika juga mencoba untuk melakukan lebih banyak manufaktur baterai karena mereka sebenarnya memiliki mineral mentah, tetapi mereka tidak memiliki kemampuan untuk melakukan pemrosesan dan daur ulang setelahnya karena hal ini sangat merugikan lingkungan, saya tidak akan mengatakan bahwa hal ini akan membebani Anda, tetapi Anda memerlukan banyak persyaratan untuk melakukannya. Dan Anda juga membutuhkan banyak dukungan dari pemerintah. Jadi, ketika Anda melihat semua ini, saya agak penasaran. Apa harapan Anda untuk ekosistem startup di Vietnam?

(18:18) Valerie Vu:

Ya. Jadi, karena sepertinya semikonduktor akan menjadi perbatasan berikutnya untuk pertumbuhan ekonomi Vietnam dan apa yang kita bahas dari beberapa episode yang lalu, kita masih membutuhkan banyak insinyur yang memenuhi syarat untuk dapat mengakomodasi semua FDI dan semua, terutama dalam rantai semikonduktor yang pindah ke Vietnam. Jadi saya berharap startup di Vietnam dapat menangkap gelombang tersebut dan membantu pertumbuhan produktivitas kami dengan meningkatkan lebih banyak bisnis digital untuk berkembang di Vietnam karena, tujuan kami adalah untuk membuat ekonomi digital menjadi setidaknya 30% dari PDB kami. Sedangkan saat ini, baru sekitar 10%. Jadi, ruang pertumbuhan kami masih sangat besar. Jadi, saya akan mengatakan bahwa saya lebih senang dengan startup yang menargetkan seperti produktivitas dan peningkatan keterampilan tenaga kerja di Vietnam.

(19:05) Jeremy Au:

Saya sendiri setuju dengan Anda bahwa teknologi pendidikan tampaknya masih cukup panas. Jelas, ada beberapa kegagalan teknologi pendidikan selama beberapa tahun terakhir. Namun saya rasa masih ada rasa lapar yang besar di kalangan kelas menengah. Jadi saya rasa ini bukan soal sisi permintaan, tapi lebih ke sisi penawaran. Ada masalah seperti para pendiri yang tidak benar-benar tahu bagaimana cara meningkatkannya. Melakukan ekonomi unit yang tepat, efisiensi operasional yang tepat. Bagi saya, ketika saya melihat Vietnam, saya pikir ini akan menarik karena penarik semikonduktor sebenarnya cukup penting sebagai bagian dari rantai nilai, jika dorongan ini benar-benar berhasil bertahan dalam jangka waktu 10 atau 20 tahun. Saya rasa orang-orang tidak terlalu paham, namun Singapura pernah memiliki industri silikon yang sangat kuat sekitar 10 tahun hingga 20 tahun yang lalu. Dan sayangnya, sebagian besar industri tersebut mengalami kemunduran, bukan? Dan banyak yang pergi ke Penang dan Malaysia, tetapi juga terus terang, sebagian besar pergi ke Taiwan dan ke Tiongkok juga, karena biaya produksinya yang rendah. Jadi, saya pikir jika dorongan ini benar-benar memungkinkan Vietnam untuk memiliki jangka waktu 20 tahun. Saya pikir sebenarnya ada banyak perusahaan fundamental yang harus keluar jika Anda membuat silikon dan semikonduktor, seperti yang bisa Anda lakukan, katakanlah, kartu grafis dengan Jensen Huang dan NVIDIA.

Tetapi sebenarnya ada banyak perusahaan pusat data komputasi. Menurut saya, pada dasarnya ini adalah rantai nilai yang benar-benar bisa Anda tingkatkan. Dan menurut saya, ini bukan tesis investasi yang dapat membuahkan hasil saat ini, tetapi saya pikir ini adalah bagian yang sangat menarik, yaitu, dapatkah Anda membayangkan Vietnam menjadi TSMC dunia. Maka sebenarnya akan ada evolusi pohon teknologi yang sangat menarik yang akan muncul darinya.

(20:25) Valerie Vu:

Ya, ini jelas seperti evolusi dari Made in Vietnam menjadi Make in Vietnam. Sejujurnya saya tidak tahu berapa banyak langkah atau seberapa sulit untuk mewujudkannya, tetapi yang pasti kita harus belajar dari ekosistem yang lebih maju, seperti AS. Itulah mengapa ekuitas, diinvestasikan untuk meminjamkan AI. Jadi saya berasumsi bahwa kami akan berinvestasi lebih banyak di samping pendidikan. Kami akan berinvestasi lebih banyak pada pembelajaran teknologi, seperti aplikasi AI di industri dan kami akan mendorong lebih banyak transformasi digital untuk perusahaan. Itulah harapan saya untuk Vietnam di tahun ini.

(20:59) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya rasa kesalahan besar yang dilakukan Singapura adalah adanya anggapan bahwa insinyur bukanlah profesi yang benar-benar baik untuk diadvokasi di Singapura. Maka salah satu keputusan besar yang mereka buat adalah mengajar mahasiswa teknik tentang bagaimana mengelola insinyur lain di, misalnya, negara-negara seperti India atau di seluruh dunia. Jadi, menurut saya tanpa teknologi yang mendalam, atau bisa juga dikatakan pemahaman mendasar tentang perangkat keras, maka Anda tidak akan mendapatkan semua blok bangunan untuk ekosistem lainnya dan saya tidak tahu, maksud saya, saya tidak ahli dalam beberapa hal ini, tetapi menurut saya, jika Anda melihat Silicon Valley, disebut Silicon Valley karena dimulai dengan Silicon, lalu semua yang lain berlapis-lapis di atasnya. Banyak dari teknologi canggih, banyak dari R & D, bahkan chatting GPT dan AI terbuka sangat didasarkan pada pemahaman mendasar tentang perangkat keras dan perangkat lunak, bukan? Dan menarik untuk melihat bahwa Singapura seperti melepaskan keunggulannya di sisi perangkat keras untuk fokus pada perangkat lunak dan yang lebih penting lagi, mengurangi fokus pada insinyur perangkat lunak dan lebih fokus pada manajer teknik, bukan?

Jadi saya rasa hal ini masuk akal dari perspektif populasi. Mungkin tidak ada cukup banyak insinyur dan sebagainya, tetapi saya pikir menarik untuk melihat sisi Vietnam benar-benar lepas landas. Dan saya pikir itulah mengapa kita melihat banyak perusahaan teknik Singapura yang merekrut banyak tenaga kerja di Vietnam sekarang. Ketika saya berada di Vietnam, saya bertemu dengan banyak perusahaan Singapura yang baru saja mempekerjakan 10, 50, 100, 200 insinyur di Vietnam. Dan mereka seharusnya bekerja dengan kantor pusat di Singapura. Namun menurut saya, ini adalah kemitraan yang menarik.

(22:17) Valerie Vu:

Ya, saya rasa bukan hanya perusahaan Singapura yang membangun tim teknologi di Vietnam, bukan? Ada banyak perusahaan seperti perusahaan Amerika, perusahaan Australia. Mereka semua menyadari betapa bagusnya insinyur perangkat lunak atau talenta teknologi di Vietnam. Jadi banyak dari mereka yang benar-benar memiliki tim teknologi mereka di Vietnam. Jadi seperti Synopsis, Atlassian, dan masih banyak lagi.

(22:36) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya pikir ini akan menarik karena, saya pikir di situlah roda penggeraknya, yaitu Anda memiliki semua talenta teknis yang sedang dilatih sekarang dan berbicara dengan lembaga pemerintah di Singapura dan saya pada dasarnya mengatakan, Hei, saya tidak memiliki masalah dengan kami melakukan outsourcing dan memiliki tim yang hebat di Vietnam, tetapi saya pikir yang akan menarik adalah, setiap orang yang merupakan insinyur junior di Vietnam, di perusahaan berikutnya akan menjadi pemimpin manajer teknik senior, bukan? Dan selanjutnya setelah itu, mereka akan menjadi CEO dan co-founder, bukan? Jadi sejujurnya, hanya dua, saya tidak tahu, apa itu, siklus talenta dari generasi baru startup Vietnam yang sangat teknis dan terlatih dengan baik. Dan saya seperti, saya katakan, ini bukan sesuatu yang kompetitif antara Singapura dan Vietnam, tetapi apakah ini merupakan dinamika yang menarik di mana ini adalah aliran modal dan talenta yang kita lihat? Jadi saya pikir, saya pikir ada kabar baik untuk ekosistem Vietnam. Dan saya pikir sampai batas tertentu hal ini tidak direplikasi di negara lain di Asia Tenggara, jadi jika Anda melihat Indonesia atau Filipina atau Thailand, saya pikir fokus pada teknik dan fokus pada pelatihan insinyur dan kumpulan talenta dan juga menggabungkannya dengan orang-orang yang mengalihdayakan peran talenta tersebut untuk tim teknis untuk bekerja dari jarak jauh. Ini sebenarnya merupakan kombinasi yang cukup unik untuk Vietnam.

(23:38) Valerie Vu:

Ya. Jadi sebelum rekaman ini, saya menjadi mentor untuk sebuah inkubasi universitas dan ya, itu adalah masukan saya juga. Mereka memiliki ide yang bagus dan semacam agenda untuk membangun inkubasi universitas, namun agendanya lebih menargetkan mahasiswa bisnis dan saya merasa mereka kurang melibatkan mahasiswa teknik teknologi, yang mungkin Anda belum pernah mendengar nama universitas tersebut sebelumnya, namun sebenarnya mereka adalah universitas teknik terbaik di Vietnam. Jadi saya cukup kagum. Saya masih cukup kagum dengan betapa bergairahnya anak muda, anak muda Vietnam dengan kewirausahaan dan, mereka meluangkan waktu ekstra di luar sekolah, di luar pekerjaan mereka untuk berinvestasi dalam inkubasi universitas ini.

(24:23) Jeremy Au:

Ketika Anda bertemu dengan mahasiswa di Vietnam, apa yang Anda perhatikan tentang mereka?

(24:27) Valerie Vu:

Ya, jadi kebanyakan dari mereka sangat penasaran dan sangat lapar. Namun beberapa mahasiswa bisnis cenderung berkumpul bersama dan melupakan teknologi, batang tubuh, dan mahasiswa teknik. Jadi tidak banyak yang menyatu antara mahasiswa non-bisnis dan bisnis. Jadi saya berharap akan ada lebih banyak acara seperti hackathon antara mahasiswa bisnis dan non-bisnis, tapi secara keseluruhan sebagian besar dari mereka sangat ingin tahu dan benar-benar ingin maju dalam perencanaan karir mereka. Satu-satunya hal adalah saat ini, mereka masih tertarik dengan nama-nama besar, konsultan besar, teknologi besar, atau nama bank besar. Namun saya rasa dalam waktu dekat, budaya tersebut akan berubah dan mereka akan lebih tertarik dengan startup.

(25:07) Jeremy Au:

Ya, mudah-mudahan begitu. Maksud saya, saya juga mengajar kewirausahaan di universitas-universitas di Singapura, seperti National University of Singapore, Singapore Management University. Satu hal yang ingin saya sampaikan adalah, jangan khawatir, mahasiswa bisnis di Singapura juga tidak bergaul dengan para insinyur di Singapura.

(25:20) Valerie Vu:

Oh, benarkah? Oh, aku tidak tahu.

(25:22) Jeremy Au:

Ini adalah masalah yang umum terjadi. Saya pikir itu hanya masalah orang bisnis, Anda tahu,

(Valerie Vu: Saya pikir mereka harus nongkrong. lagi. Ya. Mereka harus lebih banyak bergaul satu sama lain. Ya.

(25:29) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Dan saya rasa saya akan mengatakan bahwa itu adalah dinamika yang menarik dan mudah-mudahan kita akan melihat lebih banyak penyerbukan silang tidak hanya di berbagai fakultas yang berbeda seperti bisnis dan teknik, tetapi juga di berbagai negara. Untuk itu, saya ingin menyimpulkan dan meringkas tiga hal penting yang saya dapatkan dari percakapan ini.

Pertama-tama, saya pikir sangat menarik untuk mendengar tentang refleksi di tahun 2023. Senang mendengar tentang kinerja ekonomi Vietnam yang kurang baik dibandingkan dengan target pemerintah, serta cinta segitiga antara Vietnam, Amerika Serikat, dan Tiongkok dalam hal apa yang muncul di berita utama versus apa yang sebenarnya merupakan insentif dan keharusan strategis bagi Vietnam.

Kedua, terima kasih telah berbagi tentang apa yang Anda harapkan untuk tahun 2024. Saya senang mendengar tentang optimisme Anda bahwa akan ada stimulus dan fokus pada ekonomi oleh para pembuat kebijakan di Vietnam. Anda yakin bahwa akan ada upaya yang sangat kuat untuk mencapai target pertumbuhan PDB sebesar 6 hingga 6,5%.

Dan terakhir, terima kasih telah berbagi beberapa akar permasalahan yang benar-benar mendorong untuk menyelami sisi semikonduktor. Menyelami infrastruktur, menyelami pandangan pendidikan dan semangat generasi berikutnya. Saya sangat menantikan untuk bertemu dengan Anda di lain waktu.

(26:32) Valerie Vu:

Terima kasih, Jeremy. Dan sampai jumpa pada diskusi kita berikutnya.