Aaron Fu: Africa Market Complexity, Terrorism Tragedy & Purpose and Venture Capital Mission - E375

· VC and Angels,Fintech,sustainability,Purpose,Podcast Episodes

“My own Africa story completely reset how I view life and what I value in friends and work. You're meant to value a certain set of things whether that's a great apartment, or stature in your career, or being on the cover of The Straits Times, but my time in Kenya really helped reset that for me, and it's been great. It's also been trying because I had to live through a few terror attacks, and I lost one of my best friends in one of those. So, it kind of changed my perspective on how short life is and what we should spend life doing.” - Aaron Fu

“When I reflect on being brave, it's been about recognizing that there are things that I can't control and there are things that I can. One of my bravest moments was going back to Africa after the tragedy. Being able to come to grips with something like that means you’re taking a personal risk. Your family has to understand that risk because everyone else around you takes that together with you. It’s important to have a real conversation with them and make them understand why that risk is valuable for you.” - Aaron Fu

“I love understanding things in a different context. I like the idea of things being the same, but different. A lot of what’s being built in Africa and Latin America is inventing things from the ground up, whether that's new money transfer systems, new addressing systems, or new identity systems. It's the chance to build humanity from scratch. I'm not saying it's as extreme as we have to move to Mars and have to rebuild everything, but it’s pretty similar. It's intellectually very satisfying but also meaningful. If you're able to offer access to some of these services to some of these tremendously underserved populations, it makes a world of difference to large swaths of people in their daily lives. So, the meaning of it was as much a driver as the intellectual spark of it.” - Aaron Fu

Aaron Fu, VC at Digital Currency Group, and Jeremy Au talked about three main themes:

1. Venture Capital Mission: Aaron narrated his decisions to focus on fintech, venture capital, and emerging markets. He emphasized the importance of aligning professional choices with his personal values, and how investing as a career lets him help build the future

2. Africa Market Complexity: Aaron dissected the multiple frames of Africa's market, across country, city and vertical. He compared accessibility, infrastructural development, and political stability, with examples of how government regulations and competition with local telecommunications companies shape the practical business reality for emerging startups.

3. Terrorism Tragedy & Risk: Aaron shared about the tragic loss of a friend and colleague in a terrorist attack in Nairobi, Kenya. He discussed the real dangers of operating on the ground, and also the sense of purpose in building a better future for the next generation in Africa.

Jeremy and Aaron also talked about the impact of digital transformation, the evolution of consumer behavior, and the significance of building sustainable business models.

Supported by Hive Health

Are you expanding or launching a business in the Philippines? Ensuring your employees' good health is key to attracting and retaining top talent. That's where Hive Health comes in, especially for startups and small to medium-sized businesses. They specialize in providing top-quality and hassle-free healthcare plans tailored to your workplace. Learn more at www.ourhivehealth.com

(01:21) Jeremy Au:

Hey Aaron, really excited to have you on the show. We had a great time on the beach in Bali. Thanks for the Hustle Fund Camp. I just thought you had an amazing story, and I would love to share that with the broader world. Aaron, could you please introduce yourself?

(01:33) Aaron Fu:

Hey, Jeremy. So good to be on here. It feels like a bit of a dream come true. I still remember seeing you walk in at the Hustle Fund camp and going like, Oh my God, it's Jeremy. Quick intro, my name's Aaron. I'm from Singapore but have been on a mission to live and work on all continents of the world for the last couple of decades. And I'm currently based in New York. I used to live in Kenya for a couple of years, used to live in Eastern Europe for a couple of years. And I have the pleasure of been venture investing in primarily fintech, but also a bunch of generalist funds but focused on emerging markets this whole time.

(02:03) Jeremy Au:

Awesome. So how did you get into tech in the first place?

(02:06) Aaron Fu:

This is a story of my dad getting me my first computer when I was about, I think eight and started sort of wondering what we can do with this command prompt is like really cool. And it was always curious, I guess, but never really started building anything like on tech until I was like in high school. One of the first things I built was sort of a movie sharing site, which, now they're in reflection with might not have been like a hundred percent like above board. And then I think in Singapore while I was actually at Standard Chartered. I built a rideshare app as well, which was trying to introduce motorcycle ride sharing to a country of people that really didn't like the heat so that did less well, we scaled out to Myanmar and Cambodia. So I've always been interested in building technology. But I think my parents always felt that a job that didn't involve a three piece suit and cufflinks wasn't a real job. So I guess after graduation, ended up in finance and began that career in Europe and then sort of spent a couple of years in Singapore as well. And then took that career to Kenya. So yeah always wanted to be here and great I found a way to meld my sort of geekiness and getting to build stuff with a suit sometime with LPs.

(03:15) Jeremy Au: And what's interesting is there's not just tech and not just emerging markets, but you're doing venture capital. So how did you get into this career per se?

(03:22) Aaron Fu:

It was completely by accident and I have nothing but my friends to be grateful for that. So I was actually with Standard Chartered leading the digital bank strategy for them in Africa. So across eight markets. And it was that point when I saw so much more innovation and cool things happening outside the bank than inside the bank. There's still cool things happening in the bank. All respect. I love the green and blue. But so much more cool things happening outside the bank. And I think I had a couple of friends who were based in Hong Kong who were running venture funds as well. My good friend, David Lynch, who was a CTO of DBS in Hong Kong at the time, was working with a venture fund called Nest to run an accelerator. And basically he said, you should pitch them on the idea of Africa. So I came to Hong Kong twice, climbed the peak three times and basically started raising a fund for Africa with the thesis of investing in companies, on the continent to take across to Asia as their next market, because we saw very similar demographics rapidly urbanizing populations, very mobile first, young populations, but still primarily agrarian. So yeah, completely by accident. And I always thought that I would be back building a business or maybe even back in corporate. No, I'll be back building a business in two or three years, but 10 years in venture, I'm still here and I guess it's been a really cool ride.

It's just really fun to work with founders and learn about new things all the time across new regions. So, I think I'm getting pretty addicted to it.

(04:49) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. And what's interesting is that, you know, what we see is we see a lot of Southeast Asian diaspora, obviously, and they're either kind of working in Southeast Asia in terms of venture capital or tech or classically, they studied in the U. S. And to some extent U. K, and to some extent Europe. And then they live, work there. So we see a lot of Vietnamese, for example, in France, because they studied there. They work there. And then, they go to tech and because of the engineering background or experiences. And it's interesting because, you're going and really spending a lot of time working in Africa and other emerging markets.

So could you share a little bit more about how that passion came about?

(05:21) Aaron Fu:

I think even when I was in, in college, I was pretty left wing, and joined a bunch of organizations that were very much focused on social justice, very much looking at how can economics or how can business models or social enterprise sort of lift up economies and people. And so I think when I started looking into microfinance and I started looking into new form lending models, I started getting a lot more curious about these markets and it seemed a lot more meaningful than trying to roll out a new home loan product in Singapore. I'm sure that's fine too, but it just seemed a lot more meaningful.

(05:54) Aaron Fu:

And I love understanding things in a different context, that idea of same, but different. And the more I looked into what was being built in Africa and what was being built in Latin America, a lot of it was inventing things from the ground up, right? Like whether that's new money transfer systems or new addressing systems or new identity systems. It's like the chance to almost build humanity from scratch. I'm not saying it's as extreme as we have to move to Mars and have to rebuild everything, but like pretty similar.

And I think it's just fun. It's intellectually very satisfying, but also just meaningful. If you're able to offer access to some of these services to some of these populations that are tremendously underserved, it makes a world of a difference to large swaths of people in their daily lives. So, I think the meaning of it was as much a driver as, like, the intellectual spark of it.

(06:42) Jeremy Au:

Let's double click into what that means to be a world of difference for somebody to have access, because it's one of those classic social enterprise, non profit access to water, access to, you know. So, but what does it mean in this context in terms of technology, in terms of FinTech? Could you share some examples of what you've been looking at?

(06:58) Aaron Fu:

Yeah. Sure. So I think when I was first doing a scan of all the cool things I wanted to invest in Kenya, the one that like really stands out to mine is a company called Okay HI which was built by a few ex Googlers that had moved to move to Kenya. And basically their mission was simple. It was to offer addresses to the unaddressed, right? I think there's something that you and I in the modern world, take for granted in that everyone has 220 Smith Street Unit 2, but what if you don't have that? What if your default address and sort of sense of home is across two rivers, come across the big tree, take a right, you know, if you hit the cow farm, you've gone too far, right?

I think that makes it very difficult to include it. So their mission was simply to give addresses to everyone that doesn't have an address. And you might think of it as a pure like social mission because it seems like, oh, that's a nice thing for people to have, but it's also like an economic empowerment tool where with an address, suddenly you have access to financial services. Suddenly you have access to a bank account. Suddenly your employer can kind of kYC. Suddenly you have access to a whole bunch more services because you have an address. And I think that was just like such a really cool example of something that I really wanted to get behind. And it was a good sort of melding pot of something that was really impactful, but then also had like dramatic potential.

If you were the single source of addresses for every bank account opening, like in East Africa, in West Africa, you're really winning. It's a tremendously profitable business. So I think being able to find that mix of something that was highly impactful, but also highly scalable and highly profitable was cool.

(08:30) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. And what's interesting is that it feels like there's a pragmatic aspect about it, which is that addresses requires some level of mapping, logistics, government collaboration, and so forth. So what are some of the operator gritty details of building such a company, for example, in Africa?

(08:47) Aaron Fu:

Yeah. I'm sure, you know, your listeners keep up with all this out there. And it's sort of this narrative of mobile internet is going to transform Africa and it has in many ways, but I think some of the challenges are that most of that connectivity is really centered around the cities. Once you get a little bit further out, that connectivity really drops. So you've really got to build something that can cater for sort of low data bandwidth environments. I think that's certainly one thing, which a lot of engineers and product leaders and other parts of the world aren't yet so familiar with.

(09:16) Aaron Fu:

I think there's also this other idea of identity, even internet identities being sort of phone number first versus email address first. So, when I think I was launching like a few apps in Kenya, it didn't occur to me that you could have a Facebook account with a phone number, but no email address. So when we try to pull the email addresses, your unique identifier, which obvious to most people in the world, everyone has an email address. But there are lots of people that are on WhatsApp that are on all these other services that don't have an email address. So I think the sort of being able to reset your design paradigm is really important.

And I think speaking about design paradigms, that is something that like, I've always found really curiously different between Africa and Latin America in that I've really seen Latin America benefit a lot from that sort of cultural proximity to the US in that sort of e-commerce paradigms and digital banking paradigms, but a lot easier for mass populations to understand and adopt and engage with. But I think because of a bit of a dissonance between Africa and the US, I guess, there's not, they're not physically as close. It is harder to educate and to get people thinking about, Oh, I could order things this way, or I could get my things delivered this way, or I can access finance this way. I think design choices and really understanding a user that's coming from a very different place and has different sort of Interaction points with technology is important.

(10:33) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, it's interesting because a lot of emerging markets have that kind of like first exposure. So, for example, Southeast Asia, I think the past few years have seen the first wave of wealth tech, so, the concept of managing wealth, personal wealth from whatever scale, right? From private assets to public markets. But I think there's something that's starting to percolate out of Singapore into, you see the rise of those robot visors in Vietnam in the Philippines and so forth. So there's a lot of customer education that's going on. From your perspective, what do you see as some of the necessary attributes? Because I think you've seen a lot of startups die in the customer education phase, some companies seem to make it work.

(11:05) Aaron Fu:

I selfishly, like most of the time, I usually will invest in the second or third follower especially in emerging markets, especially if they're trying to introduce like a new way of doing something. And that's partly because a few reasons, but one of which is unlike Singapore, where you can imagine sort of a credit bureau is already built, payment systems are already built, KYC systems are already built very often, if you're a first mover, say in e-commerce in Kenya, I remembered Jumia had to build their own logistic systems, their own payment systems, the whole like spectrum of it. And so there's a lot of upfront capital expenditure beyond the software and beyond the core product that you have to invest in if you are first mover into a new, way of doing something.

As a second mover, first mover already has spun up all these other services. You can very easily plug in and the customer base is already been identified. So certainly I do feel that like first mover advantage is very hard to capitalize on. I think the other interesting challenge sometimes we see in Africa and some other emerging markets is this idea that there are a lot of dominant corporations and telcos, especially that have a reputation, deservedly or not of sort of replicating whatever a start up does and undercutting price or engage government to change regulations in a certain way to make sure that they win out of that, that I think is also a constant challenge that entrepreneurs that are first to market with a product face as well.

I think case in point for me was, I'm really good friends with the guys who launched the equivalent of Lipa Na M-PESA, so payment through M-PESA or mobile money at a store versus peer to peer, it's a company called Kopo Kopo. And they were gaining so much traction, right? They were launching in petrol stations, like in supermarkets and like all the above and were really skyrocketing. And I guess, one day the dominant telco decided this should be our business. And then went straight to all these large local corporate brand names and went, you should be working with us. We'll charge you less. We'll offer superior product. And you're just dead. It's really difficult to navigate some of these environments sometimes. So I have all the respect for anyone trying to bring anything to life, like in Africa I think the common startup analogy is building a company is something like building a plane as you jump off a cliff, right?

I think in Africa, you're doing that while blindfolded and your hands tied behind your back, it's just so difficult. So there's nothing but admiration and yeah, empathy for folks that are trying to build out there. And that's why I think I really go out of my way and I think a lot of investors in Africa go out their way to make sure that founders are properly backed because it's already such a harsh look.

(13:32) Jeremy Au:

Yeah, I think that's common, right? I mean, for example, in Vietnam, there was a class of startups in the wealth tech space that had their licenses pinged, right? And you call it regulatory actions and so forth, but it's on one side. And of course, across Southeast Asia, there's a lot of like payment transfers, money transfers. And I think a lot of governments have been inspired by Singapore that this should be a national system and there doesn't need to be a toll keeper. And so, for some markets where there's no local player effectively, then, obviously, there's a huge upgrade. And then , for example, Vietnam, there are some dominant payment rails that were corporate and startup oriented. And yeah, it's getting slowly evaporated, by, I think government decision, which I think is fair in some ways, but also, it's a risk for founders to be thoughtful about.

(14:11) Aaron Fu:

It's definitely a risk for founders. I think it's a risk for like venture investors as well. So like, I think the more famous, recent story was in, in Lagos, in Nigeria. One day they decided that they were going to ban motorcycle taxis in the city. At least the ones that were app based. And so suddenly three companies just had no business. They had to quickly pivot towards being primarily parcel delivery and hopefully tide it over. And I think, again, as venture investors, you get this phone call from your LPs going is this going to happen to all the markets? So, I think a lot of my LPs sort of go like, why are you so calm about it all? I'm like, it's bound to happen. It's factored into the model. We know that there's a 20 percent chance they'll shut this business down, but this company operates in three, four other markets for that just reason. They're not going to shut down four markets simultaneously. So there's a way to manage that risk, but for folks that I guess that are more used to more predictable and predictable regulatory environments, it is sort of a really tough thing to get their heads around.

(15:09) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. You know, I think it's interesting because you use the word markets, right? So, multiple markets. And I think for most people, they have a pretty spotty mental map of Africa. And so, when you say markets, are you looking at it in terms of like cities? Suburbs and neighborhoods, countries, regions? How should we be thinking about Africa as a single market? I guess continents. But how should we think about the market breakout? Yeah,

(15:29) Aaron Fu:

Yeah. I think one of your suggestions around looking at it as individual cities is probably the most apt, right? So I think Lagos in Nigeria, in West Africa, is probably like one of the most thriving but I think sometimes people prefer to sell the idea of the overall country of Nigeria in terms of population size, total GDP, but I think if you, and that's great from a TAM perspective, but if you look at who we can actually service and who is actually buying your digital payments and who is actually using your e-commerce facilities, like that's all in one city, right?

So I think the city led approach is probably the one that I'm certainly most of a fan of. Maybe giving your listeners like a quick sort of tour around the continent. I think in East Africa, Nairobi is really has always been leading the way, whether that's because of M-PESA, mobile money. It's also home to like the largest UN headquarters outside of New York. So there's usually a lot of like international activity there. Lots of Pan Africa companies are domiciled there. So again, very similar to the Singapore for Southeast Asia story. So it benefits a lot from that. I think obviously in Southern Africa.

South Africa between Johannesburg and Cape Town. They're two very strong ecosystems. Again, slightly different in their own sort of ways. In West Africa, you've got Lagos, you've got Accra, which is sort of next door, which many people describe as a calmer Lagos. But it's also a much smaller market. We've seen a lot of founders launch in Accra to sort of pilot, and then once that pilot has been proven out, then launch into Lagos with sort of their seed or pre series A sort of watches. Dakar, so Francophone Africa is a region that we're very excited about as well, because it's many ways like the single biggest sub region, which shares the same regulators, the same currency. So Dakar and Abidjan are both thriving cities, deep connections to Europe. I think you look at North Africa, I think a lot of funds treat North Africa as a completely separate sub region as well, because if you look at culture, links stage of development of the cities, it's also like way up there, so you've got sort of Casablanca and Morocco. You've got Cairo, which is soaked up, I think, like 25 to 30 percent of all funding that has gone into Africa. So Cairo is a really thriving city.

So I think the city led approach to me is the one that makes the most sense because then you're really designing for that environment. But I guess it depends on which sector you're building for, right? So if you're building in Agritech, then of course you want to look beyond the cities because that's where your customer base is. But for most companies, especially if it's like being built I feel like the city led approach probably makes the most sense.

(17:52) Jeremy Au:

Let's talk about headlines, because every time I open up the news, I think there's only three stories I read about Africa. So, the first, of course, is that in Africa, the population growth is fast. China demographic is just starting to slow down. India is starting to slow down as well. So by 2100, Africa will be huge or large continent, lots of people, large TAM. I think that's one story.

The second story is very much oh, there's crisis. There's political chaos. There's a rebellion. There's a coup. So, this is the kind of news that we see.

And then the third thing is, some sort of like a lot of human interest stories. So it's like this one family in Africa that is going through this experience, whether it's positive or negative. So those seem to be the three sort of headlines that comes to mind on the news, if I open up the New York Times or Wall Street Journal or The Economist. So I'm just curious, what do you think is your story? How would you describe like the pragmatic side of what you're seeing in Africa?

(18:40) Aaron Fu:

By the way, I think like the first two observations and the first two kinds of stories are very intricately linked. If you think about the population boom, sure, that is super exciting. It is going to be the workforce of the world for the next decades to come, that so much is guaranteed and I think beyond the number of people just the energy and the hunger for success is just unprecedented. And I know, like Chinese people and folk from South Asian subcontinent have a reputation for working really hard and striving. But I think I've seen it happen in Nigeria, Kenya, where people fight really hard to be successful. So I think that hunger among the youth to make it work is such a powerful force.

If you look at Nigerian diaspora and Silicon Valley and London, they're leading a lot of companies and really making headways. So that part to me is really exciting. A lot of them have also begun to engage with internet economy for the first time, whether as creators or as developers, you've got sort of that, unicorn and Andela that was looking to create, develop a workforce in Africa for the world. So, I really believe that all these efforts will lead towards an economically prosperous nation.

But towards the second narrative that you have, it also presents tremendous risk because if the youth in Africa are not able to find the jobs and fulfillment and meaning that they need, then obviously they're going to turn towards their leaders, obviously they're going to turn towards maybe less savory sort of day to day tasks. And that's a major risk. If we get job creation in Africa wrong, the world will pay the price. When we look at migrants getting on boats to try and cross the Mediterranean, when we look at African migrants trying to get to Mexico to even get up to the US, this all has a root cause. And that root cause is domestic economic prosperity. And I, for one, whether foolishly or not, believe that the key to unlocking that is in its own talent, its own entrepreneurial talent. So, I invest in a lot of companies that try and help SMEs become stronger, more robust, try and help them gain access to more finance, because I think Africa needs to create sort of jobs for itself, not just as a profitable enterprise, but as a necessity for the world to continue to be stable.

(20:49) Aaron Fu:

So, I think those narratives that you mentioned make a lot of sense to me. I think my own Africa story has this one where I feel like it completely reset how I view life and the meaning of it and what I value in friends and what I value in work and it sort of allowed me that, right? I feel you would empathize that sitting in Singapore, you're meant to value a certain set of things whether that's a great apartment or stature in your career, cover of Straits Times, like whatever that is, but I think time in Kenya really helped reset that for me. And it's been really great. It's also been really trying because obviously I had to live through a few terror attacks, which hit home very hard. Actually, I lost one of my best friends in a terror attack a couple of years ago, and yesterday was actually the anniversary of that. And so it's kind of changed my perspective on how short life is and what we should spend life doing.

(21:40) Jeremy Au:

Could you share a little bit more details about where and why this terror attack happened?

(21:44) Aaron Fu:

Yeah, sure. It's tough because I feel partly responsible for it, but it happened at the sort of Dusit hotel, which was, if you're familiar with Africa, there are a lot of these compounds, like a hotel plus office complex. And there were a bunch of gunmen. I think they came to be from Al Shabaab who had come in and they took over for days. Suddenly there was one evening where we heard that it had happened and we were all desperately trying to check who was there, who was not there, who's still there. And why it hit home for me beyond my friend was that I had a co-working space that was there too. So I had people that were employees that were also there and they had barricaded themselves in that space. They were frantically texting. And it's tough. They don't teach you how to deal with this. I certainly didn't feel emotionally equipped to understand how to deal with this.

So a night passed. And basically we were trying to ring every hospital to figure out where he was, where our friends were. And yeah, eventually, they did find his body. And he actually went out in the first wave. So he went out in a blast. So at least we know it was slightly painless is what I guess the doctors told us, but it's tough. And I was scheduled to fly out for another engagement 24 hours later. And that was a very somber ride to the airport for sure. And to be honest, I left not being sure if I would want to come back. But I think back to my earlier point around stability and employment and economic prosperity being a driver for radicalism, unless we're there to try and solve it, this will persist. So yeah, his passing was also the catalyst for me starting a small, micro VC with a few of his friends and myself, because it was always his dream. And his name is Jason Spindler. It was always his dream to start a fund with all of us. And so, the least we could do was give it a shot.

So we're glad like we brought that to life as well. And that was nice, but yeah, it's not without its own tragedy and I can't even begin to describe my family and my friends' reactions to it back in Singapore as well. It just felt very out of this world for them because you read in the news and it always seems two or three levels apart from your own life. And it's different when it's people who are super close to you.

(23:52) Jeremy Au:

Wow. That's super heavy. And I appreciate you sharing that. Well, I mean, that's the first thing I had respond is that, you can't be responsible for that. I mean, he was working at a coworking space and the responsibility's on criminals and the folks who decided to carry out attack. I mean, you know, so,

(24:06) Aaron Fu:

Sure, but you can't fight that feeling in your mind. But like, you know, if we weren't friends, if I hadn't invited him to come work at the space, maybe he would be around, but then we wouldn't have been friends. And then that would have been also sucky. So

(24:17) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. That's a crazy story. I think that's something that's on the minds of many folks, because personal safety is one of the benefits of working in the US. A lot of people stay in Europe, even Singapore, people want to stay there. And so personal safety and risk is a big part for people's minds. And honestly, it deters a lot of folks from working in emerging markets. How do you think people should be thoughtful about that dynamic?

(24:37) Aaron Fu:

Yeah, I think, and this is going to be a horrible generalization but I think by and large, most Singaporeans I speak to about opportunities in Africa probably overestimate the risk by a factor of about 10X purely because of the stories that they hear. I think media is very good at overtelling certain aspects of it. So I really just say that come spend some time, speak to more people that have lived there or have built businesses there or have spent time there. See it for yourself, experience it for yourself and things will get better. When I was in Kenya, I made sure that every year, we brought a few interns from SMU or from Singapore Poly just to experience a few months because they'll go back and they'll tell their friends.

And suddenly, because someone that spent time there, it's significantly more de-risked. I also remember when I first landed in Kenya. I was maybe one of the Singaporeans that were there. We all knew each other. We had the same WhatsApp group. It was a great close community, but we always wondered why there weren't more. So I will say that it's risk reward, right? I think Nairobi is obviously a lot safer than a few of the other surrounding sort of countries too. So pick it. I remembered when Standard Chartered had first offered to send me to Africa. Yeah, It was Lagos first. And I remember HR sending a whole bunch of different apartment choices, but there were no photos of the bedroom. They were all photos of the fences and the generator and the water supply. I was like, Oh my God. But it just goes to show what the focus is.

So, you know, I think it's just focusing on things that could go wrong, but I think it's much better to spend your heart and your mind on things that will go right like what happens if my experience becomes very positive? It's kind of, you manage your own risks, right? I'd say things like if you were first time on the continent, please don't land straight into Mogadishu. I think that's a bad idea. Don't do that. Land to Nairobi, please, you know, get people to go around with you.

(26:28) Jeremy Au:

Yeah. Before we turn to the next chapter, what is the name of that micro VC fund and perhaps a website where people could reach out if they want to chip in?

(26:35) Aaron Fu:

Sure. Yeah. Yeah. It's called Sherpa Ventures and the website is sherpa.africa.

(26:40) Jeremy Au:

Awesome. So on the next chapter, what I want to ask you is, could you share about a time that you personally have been brave?

(26:45) Aaron Fu:

Besides that , one. I think to me, when I reflect on being brave it's been about recognizing that there are things that I can't control and there are things that I can. For me when I talked about leaving for the airport that day, not coming back, I think the first time landing back into Africa after that happened, that to me was probably one of my bravest moments in the last few years. I'd say being able to come to grips with you're taking a personal risk. Your family has to understand that you're taking that risk because it's not just your right to take that risk, right? Everyone else around you takes that together with you and having that real conversation with them going like, I understand that you think this risk is unnecessary, but I need to tell you about why it's important to me.

So I think there's two layers to it. The first is taking that step to come back. And the second is making sure that the people around me were comfortable with that as well and fighting harder than ever to make sure that Africa got the right capital, talent, support and attention that it needs to thrive.

Yeah, and making that a mission. So I'd say that would be the story. It's not as specific, but yeah.

(27:49) Jeremy Au:

I think what's interesting is that obviously, you mentioned about checking in with your family and loved ones, and I know that you recently became a dad. So I was just kind of curious about perhaps, has becoming a parent change how you look at mission and impact because I know it has for me. I'm just kind of curious for you how it has shifted.

(28:04) Aaron Fu:

I think it's the most beautiful thing about becoming a parent is that it shifts your timeline out significantly out into the future. I think prior to Daniel coming into our lives, I thought in two, three decades ahead, now I am more comfortable thinking a century ahead. What is the world we want to create for him? What are the products that should exist in his time? What technologies would exist in his time? And what governance will exist around the technologies at the time, right? So it's certainly helped me ruthlessly prioritize the work I engage in, the founders I decide to spend time with, and the teams that I decide to surround myself with and work with as well.

And it just focuses your attention on what is the world you want to create in 50 to 100 years. Yeah, 50 years, 100 years time, right? And it's for him. It's not really for me anymore. And so, yeah it's definitely changed that risk appetite. I certainly am looking forward to how my travel schedule is now that he's in our lives and he can spend more time home. But yeah, I think being able to reflect on what kind of world you want to create for him in a hundred years probably is the biggest change.

(29:08) Jeremy Au:

When you think about the next 100 years, what do you think is for sure going to happen? And what do you think is not sure what's going to happen?

(29:14) Aaron Fu:

I think Africa's significance when it comes to impact on the global economy will be felt, and I use the word impact because I don't, I think the jury's still out as to whether it's positive or negative but there's such incredible momentum towards making it positive that we hope. In terms of what I'm not sure about is in a hundred years I'm not sure that sort of liberal democracy that has led the way this whole time is going to be the predominant model of government, like in the world or the most respected form of government in the world that, and that, that part like really worries me. Cause I think we take that for granted in our lives that of course there's a general trend towards more democratic rule, the general trend towards more, I guess socialist governments, but that's not necessarily how history might pan out. And that is probably something that I'm watching really close to you. And I think that interplays a lot with economic prosperity as well. I think when you have economies where the youth do not see a way out, you end up in situations with bad leaders. Bad leaders only self perpetuate and when you have entire sub regions of bad leaders going for decades, you put the world at risk.

So that's probably the bit that I'm less sure about, but I'm a hundred percent sure that Africa will have a major impact on the world economy in one way, shape, or form. Either from a talent perspective, or from an idea generation perspective, from a clean energy perspective, right? There's just so much happening on the continent that's it's crazy.

(30:37) Aaron Fu:

I have to also kind of one my, my angel portfolio also is very heavily geared towards sustainability and climate these days. And so recently I invested in a company in Kenya that's doing direct air carbon capture. And I believe that because of Kenya's unique geology sitting on that volcanic fault with near limitless geothermal energy, if done right, they could suck so much carbon out of the air on completely renewable energy based and create a thriving economy doing that, right? We have the opportunity to get it right and that makes me very hopeful. That makes me very hopeful and I hope that you know more investors and more individuals start looking into these opportunities as well.

(31:15) Jeremy Au:

Great. Thank you so much for sharing. On that note, I'd love to wrap things up by summarizing the three big takeaways I got from this. First of all, thank you so much for sharing about how you got into FinTech, venture capital, and, emerging markets, especially Africa. I thought it was just fascinating to hear about those individual career decisions that you made, but also I think some of the personal benefits and mission and parameters that you were thinking about in order to make that leap.

Secondly, thank you so much for sharing about Africa as a market. I thought it was fascinating to look at it in terms of the discussion about whether it's a city versus region versus country versus continent level. So I thought it was interesting to see the trade offs in terms of total adjustable market. I also mentioned about connectivity, political stability, as well as market opportunity and local market competition. So it's interesting to see also some of the similar dynamics in emerging markets, for example, with government regulation changes, as well as local telcos competing, or Sherlocking or competing with local startups.

Lastly, thank you so much for sharing about your personal experiences. I really appreciated how much you shared about your friendship with your coworker who unfortunately passed away in that terrorist attack. I think it's a sobering reflection about the fact that emerging markets, there is risk in each market, but there's also a strong sense of purpose and mission that goes behind investing and bring capital. I thought it was very special that you shared about why you're doing it, which is for the next 100 years about investing in a future where there are strong leaders, strong institutions, strong talent and strong economies to give people a better future. On that note, thank you so much for sharing your story, Aaron.

(32:44) Aaron Fu:

Thank you, Jeremy for the chance. I've listened to you almost every other day on my ride to Connecticut and it's been a dream to get the chat. So thank you for sharing my story.

 

"Kisah saya di Afrika benar-benar mengubah cara pandang saya terhadap kehidupan dan apa yang saya hargai dari teman dan pekerjaan. Anda ditakdirkan untuk menghargai hal-hal tertentu, apakah itu apartemen yang bagus, atau status dalam karier Anda, atau menjadi sampul depan The Straits Times, tetapi waktu saya di Kenya benar-benar membantu mengatur ulang hal tersebut untuk saya, dan itu luar biasa. Hal ini juga sangat sulit karena saya harus hidup melalui beberapa serangan teror, dan saya kehilangan salah satu teman terbaik saya dalam salah satu serangan tersebut. Jadi, hal ini mengubah perspektif saya tentang betapa singkatnya hidup ini dan apa yang harus kita lakukan dalam hidup ini." - Aaron Fu

 

"Ketika saya merenungkan tentang menjadi pemberani, ini adalah tentang menyadari bahwa ada hal-hal yang tidak dapat saya kendalikan dan ada hal-hal yang dapat saya kendalikan. Salah satu momen paling berani saya adalah kembali ke Afrika setelah tragedi tersebut. Mampu menghadapi hal seperti itu berarti Anda mengambil risiko pribadi. Keluarga Anda harus memahami risiko tersebut karena semua orang di sekitar Anda ikut menanggung risiko tersebut. Penting untuk melakukan percakapan yang nyata dengan mereka dan membuat mereka mengerti mengapa risiko itu berharga bagi Anda." - Aaron Fu

 

"Saya suka memahami berbagai hal dalam konteks yang berbeda. Saya menyukai gagasan bahwa segala sesuatunya sama, tetapi berbeda. Banyak hal yang sedang dibangun di Afrika dan Amerika Latin adalah menciptakan sesuatu dari bawah ke atas, apakah itu sistem transfer uang baru, sistem pengalamatan baru, atau sistem identitas baru. Ini adalah kesempatan untuk membangun kemanusiaan dari awal. Saya tidak mengatakan bahwa hal ini seekstrim kita harus pindah ke Mars dan membangun kembali semuanya, namun ini cukup mirip. Secara intelektual sangat memuaskan tetapi juga bermakna. Jika Anda dapat menawarkan akses ke beberapa layanan ini kepada beberapa populasi yang sangat kurang terlayani, itu membuat perbedaan besar bagi sebagian besar orang dalam kehidupan sehari-hari mereka. Jadi, makna dari proyek ini merupakan pendorong sekaligus percikan intelektual dari proyek ini." - Aaron Fu

Aaron Fu, VC di Digital Currency Group, dan Jeremy Au membicarakan tiga tema utama:

1. Misi Modal Ventura: Aaron menceritakan keputusannya untuk fokus pada fintech, modal ventura, dan pasar negara berkembang. Ia menekankan pentingnya menyelaraskan pilihan profesional dengan nilai-nilai pribadinya, dan bagaimana berinvestasi sebagai karier memungkinkannya membantu membangun masa depan

2. Kompleksitas Pasar Afrika: Aaron membedah berbagai kerangka pasar Afrika, baik di tingkat negara, kota, maupun vertikal. Dia membandingkan aksesibilitas, pembangunan infrastruktur, dan stabilitas politik, dengan contoh-contoh bagaimana peraturan pemerintah dan persaingan dengan perusahaan telekomunikasi lokal membentuk realitas bisnis praktis untuk perusahaan rintisan yang sedang berkembang.

3. Tragedi dan Risiko Terorisme: Aaron berbagi tentang kehilangan teman dan kolega yang tragis dalam serangan teroris di Nairobi, Kenya. Dia membahas bahaya nyata dari beroperasi di lapangan, dan juga rasa tujuan dalam membangun masa depan yang lebih baik untuk generasi berikutnya di Afrika.

Jeremy dan Aaron juga berbicara tentang dampak transformasi digital, evolusi perilaku konsumen, dan pentingnya membangun model bisnis yang berkelanjutan.

(01:21) Jeremy Au:

Hai Aaron, sangat senang sekali Anda bisa hadir di acara ini. Kami bersenang-senang di pantai di Bali. Terima kasih untuk Hustle Fund Camp. Saya rasa Anda memiliki cerita yang luar biasa, dan saya ingin sekali membagikannya kepada dunia yang lebih luas. Aaron, bisakah Anda memperkenalkan diri?

(01:33) Aaron Fu:

Hei, Jeremy. Senang sekali berada di sini. Rasanya seperti mimpi yang menjadi kenyataan. Saya masih ingat saat melihat Anda masuk ke kamp Hustle Fund dan berkata, Ya Tuhan, itu Jeremy. Perkenalan singkat, nama saya Aaron. Saya berasal dari Singapura, namun saya telah menjalankan misi untuk tinggal dan bekerja di semua benua di dunia selama beberapa dekade terakhir. Dan saat ini saya tinggal di New York. Saya pernah tinggal di Kenya selama beberapa tahun, pernah tinggal di Eropa Timur selama beberapa tahun. Dan saya senang sekali melakukan investasi ventura terutama di bidang fintech, tetapi juga sejumlah dana generalis tetapi berfokus pada pasar negara berkembang selama ini.

(02:03) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi, bagaimana Anda bisa terjun ke dunia teknologi?

(02:06) Aaron Fu:

Ini adalah cerita tentang ayah saya yang memberikan komputer pertama saya ketika saya berusia sekitar delapan tahun dan mulai bertanya-tanya apa yang bisa kita lakukan dengan command prompt ini, sepertinya sangat keren. Dan saya selalu penasaran, saya kira, tapi tidak pernah benar-benar mulai membangun sesuatu seperti di bidang teknologi sampai saya duduk di bangku SMA. Salah satu hal pertama yang saya buat adalah semacam situs berbagi film, yang sekarang sudah direfleksikan dan mungkin tidak seratus persen seperti di atas. Dan kemudian saya pikir di Singapura ketika saya masih bekerja di Standard Chartered. Saya juga membangun aplikasi berbagi tumpangan, yang mencoba memperkenalkan berbagi tumpangan sepeda motor ke negara yang tidak terlalu menyukai cuaca panas, sehingga tidak berjalan dengan baik, dan kami melebarkan sayap ke Myanmar dan Kamboja. Jadi saya selalu tertarik untuk membangun teknologi. Namun, saya rasa orang tua saya selalu merasa bahwa pekerjaan yang tidak melibatkan setelan jas tiga potong dan manset bukanlah pekerjaan yang sesungguhnya. Jadi saya kira setelah lulus, saya bekerja di bidang keuangan dan memulai karier di Eropa dan kemudian menghabiskan beberapa tahun di Singapura. Dan kemudian membawa karier itu ke Kenya. Jadi ya, saya selalu ingin berada di sini dan saya menemukan cara untuk memadukan kegemaran saya dan membuat sesuatu dengan setelan jas dengan piringan hitam.

(03:15) Jeremy Au: Dan yang menarik adalah bukan hanya teknologi dan bukan hanya pasar negara berkembang, tapi Anda juga melakukan modal ventura. Jadi bagaimana Anda bisa masuk ke karir ini?

(03:22) Aaron Fu:

Itu benar-benar tidak disengaja dan saya tidak punya apa-apa selain teman-teman saya untuk bersyukur atas hal itu. Jadi, saya sebenarnya bekerja di Standard Chartered untuk memimpin strategi bank digital mereka di Afrika. Jadi di delapan pasar. Dan pada saat itulah saya melihat lebih banyak inovasi dan hal-hal keren yang terjadi di luar bank daripada di dalam bank. Masih ada hal-hal keren yang terjadi di dalam bank. Dengan segala hormat. Saya suka warna hijau dan biru. Namun, jauh lebih banyak hal keren yang terjadi di luar bank. Dan saya rasa saya memiliki beberapa teman yang berbasis di Hong Kong yang juga menjalankan dana ventura. Teman baik saya, David Lynch, yang merupakan CTO DBS di Hong Kong pada saat itu, bekerja dengan dana ventura bernama Nest untuk menjalankan akselerator. Dan pada dasarnya dia berkata, Anda harus mempresentasikan ide tentang Afrika kepada mereka. Jadi saya datang ke Hong Kong dua kali, mendaki puncaknya tiga kali dan pada dasarnya mulai menggalang dana untuk Afrika dengan tesis berinvestasi di perusahaan-perusahaan, di benua itu untuk dibawa ke Asia sebagai pasar berikutnya, karena kami melihat demografi yang sangat mirip dengan populasi yang mengalami urbanisasi dengan cepat, populasi yang sangat mobile dan muda, namun masih didominasi oleh agrikultur. Jadi ya, benar-benar tidak sengaja. Dan saya selalu berpikir bahwa saya akan kembali membangun bisnis atau bahkan mungkin kembali bekerja di perusahaan. Tidak, saya akan kembali membangun bisnis dalam dua atau tiga tahun lagi, tetapi 10 tahun di dunia usaha, saya masih di sini dan saya rasa ini adalah perjalanan yang sangat keren.

Sangat menyenangkan bisa bekerja sama dengan para pendiri dan belajar tentang hal-hal baru setiap saat di berbagai wilayah baru. Jadi, saya rasa saya mulai ketagihan.

(04:49) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Dan yang menarik adalah, Anda tahu, apa yang kami lihat adalah kami melihat banyak diaspora Asia Tenggara, tentu saja, dan mereka bekerja di Asia Tenggara dalam hal modal ventura atau teknologi atau secara klasik, mereka belajar di Amerika Serikat, Inggris, dan Eropa. Dan kemudian mereka tinggal dan bekerja di sana. Jadi kita melihat banyak orang Vietnam, misalnya, di Prancis, karena mereka belajar di sana. Mereka bekerja di sana. Dan kemudian, mereka masuk ke bidang teknologi dan karena latar belakang atau pengalaman teknik. Dan ini menarik karena, Anda pergi dan benar-benar menghabiskan banyak waktu untuk bekerja di Afrika dan pasar negara berkembang lainnya.

Jadi, bisakah Anda berbagi lebih banyak tentang bagaimana semangat itu muncul?

(05:21) Aaron Fu:

Saya pikir bahkan ketika saya masih kuliah, saya cukup sayap kiri, dan bergabung dengan banyak organisasi yang sangat fokus pada keadilan sosial, sangat memperhatikan bagaimana ekonomi atau bagaimana model bisnis atau perusahaan sosial dapat mengangkat ekonomi dan masyarakat. Jadi saya pikir ketika saya mulai melihat ke dalam keuangan mikro dan saya mulai melihat model-model pinjaman bentuk baru, saya mulai merasa lebih penasaran dengan pasar-pasar ini dan tampaknya jauh lebih bermakna daripada mencoba meluncurkan produk pinjaman rumah baru di Singapura. Saya yakin itu juga tidak masalah, namun hal ini terasa lebih bermakna.

(05:54) Aaron Fu:

Dan saya senang memahami berbagai hal dalam konteks yang berbeda, ide yang sama, tetapi berbeda. Dan semakin saya melihat apa yang sedang dibangun di Afrika dan apa yang sedang dibangun di Amerika Latin, banyak hal yang diciptakan dari bawah ke atas, bukan? Seperti sistem transfer uang baru atau sistem pengalamatan baru atau sistem identitas baru. Ini seperti kesempatan untuk hampir membangun umat manusia dari nol. Saya tidak mengatakan bahwa hal ini ekstrem seperti kita harus pindah ke Mars dan membangun ulang semuanya, tapi hampir mirip.

Dan menurut saya, ini sangat menyenangkan. Secara intelektual sangat memuaskan, namun juga sangat bermakna. Jika Anda dapat menawarkan akses ke beberapa layanan ini kepada beberapa populasi yang sangat kurang terlayani, hal ini akan membuat perbedaan yang sangat besar bagi sebagian besar orang dalam kehidupan sehari-hari mereka. Jadi, menurut saya, makna dari hal ini adalah sebagai pendorong, seperti halnya percikan intelektualnya.

(06:42) Jeremy Au:

Mari kita klik dua kali untuk mengetahui apa artinya membuat perbedaan bagi seseorang untuk mendapatkan akses, karena ini adalah salah satu perusahaan sosial klasik, akses non profit ke air, akses ke, Anda tahu. Jadi, apa artinya dalam konteks ini dalam hal teknologi, dalam hal FinTech? Bisakah Anda berbagi beberapa contoh dari apa yang telah Anda lihat?

(06:58) Aaron Fu:

Ya. Tentu. Jadi saya pikir ketika saya pertama kali melakukan pemindaian terhadap semua hal keren yang ingin saya investasikan di Kenya, salah satu yang sangat menonjol bagi saya adalah perusahaan bernama Okay HI yang dibangun oleh beberapa mantan karyawan Google yang pindah ke Kenya. Dan pada dasarnya misi mereka sederhana. Yaitu untuk menawarkan alamat kepada mereka yang tidak memiliki alamat, bukan? Saya pikir ada sesuatu yang Anda dan saya di dunia modern ini, anggap remeh, yaitu setiap orang memiliki alamat 220 Smith Street Unit 2, tapi bagaimana jika Anda tidak memilikinya? Bagaimana jika alamat default Anda dan semacam rasa rumah Anda adalah di seberang dua sungai, melintasi pohon besar, belok ke kanan, Anda tahu, jika Anda sampai di peternakan sapi, Anda sudah terlalu jauh, bukan?

Saya rasa hal itu membuatnya sangat sulit untuk memasukkannya. Jadi misi mereka hanyalah memberikan alamat kepada semua orang yang tidak memiliki alamat. Dan Anda mungkin menganggapnya sebagai misi sosial murni karena sepertinya, oh, itu adalah hal yang bagus untuk dimiliki oleh orang-orang, tetapi ini juga seperti alat pemberdayaan ekonomi di mana dengan alamat, tiba-tiba Anda memiliki akses ke layanan keuangan. Tiba-tiba Anda memiliki akses ke rekening bank. Tiba-tiba atasan Anda bisa melakukan KYC. Tiba-tiba Anda memiliki akses ke lebih banyak layanan karena Anda memiliki alamat. Dan saya pikir itu adalah contoh yang sangat keren dari sesuatu yang benar-benar ingin saya lakukan. Dan itu adalah semacam perpaduan yang bagus dari sesuatu yang benar-benar berdampak, namun juga memiliki potensi yang dramatis.

Jika Anda adalah sumber tunggal alamat untuk setiap pembukaan rekening bank, seperti di Afrika Timur, di Afrika Barat, Anda benar-benar menang. Ini adalah bisnis yang sangat menguntungkan. Jadi, menurut saya, bisa menemukan perpaduan antara sesuatu yang sangat berdampak, tetapi juga sangat terukur dan sangat menguntungkan itu keren.

(08:30) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Dan yang menarik adalah rasanya ada aspek pragmatis tentang hal ini, yaitu bahwa alamat memerlukan beberapa tingkat pemetaan, logistik, kolaborasi dengan pemerintah, dan sebagainya. Jadi, apa saja detail yang harus diperhatikan oleh operator dalam membangun perusahaan seperti itu, misalnya, di Afrika?

(08:47) Aaron Fu:

Ya, saya yakin, Anda tahu, para pendengar Anda mengikuti semua ini di luar sana. Dan ini semacam narasi tentang internet seluler yang akan mengubah Afrika dan dalam banyak hal memang benar, tetapi saya pikir beberapa tantangannya adalah sebagian besar konektivitas tersebut benar-benar berpusat di sekitar kota. Begitu Anda pergi sedikit lebih jauh, konektivitas itu benar-benar menurun. Jadi, Anda benar-benar harus membangun sesuatu yang dapat melayani lingkungan dengan bandwidth data yang rendah. Saya rasa itu adalah satu hal yang belum begitu dipahami oleh banyak insinyur dan pemimpin produk serta bagian dunia lainnya.

(09:16) Aaron Fu:

Saya pikir ada juga ide lain tentang identitas, bahkan identitas internet yang mengutamakan nomor telepon dibandingkan alamat email. Jadi, ketika saya pikir saya meluncurkan beberapa aplikasi di Kenya, tidak terpikir oleh saya bahwa Anda bisa memiliki akun Facebook dengan nomor telepon, tetapi tidak memiliki alamat email. Jadi, ketika kami mencoba menarik alamat email, pengenal unik Anda, yang jelas bagi sebagian besar orang di dunia, semua orang memiliki alamat email. Tetapi ada banyak orang yang menggunakan WhatsApp dan semua layanan lain yang tidak memiliki alamat email. Jadi menurut saya, kemampuan untuk mengatur ulang paradigma desain Anda sangatlah penting.

Dan saya pikir berbicara tentang paradigma desain, itu adalah sesuatu yang seperti, saya selalu menemukan perbedaan yang sangat aneh antara Afrika dan Amerika Latin, karena saya benar-benar melihat Amerika Latin mendapatkan banyak manfaat dari kedekatan budaya dengan AS dalam hal paradigma e-commerce dan paradigma perbankan digital, tetapi jauh lebih mudah bagi masyarakat untuk memahami dan mengadopsi serta terlibat. Namun, saya pikir karena ada sedikit perbedaan antara Afrika dan AS, saya kira, tidak ada, mereka tidak terlalu dekat secara fisik. Lebih sulit untuk mengedukasi dan membuat orang berpikir, Oh, saya bisa memesan barang dengan cara ini, atau saya bisa mengirimkan barang dengan cara ini, atau saya bisa mengakses keuangan dengan cara ini. Menurut saya, pilihan desain dan benar-benar memahami pengguna yang datang dari tempat yang sangat berbeda dan memiliki titik interaksi yang berbeda dengan teknologi adalah hal yang penting.

(10:33) Jeremy Au:

Ya, ini menarik karena banyak pasar negara berkembang yang baru pertama kali mengenalnya. Jadi, misalnya, Asia Tenggara, saya pikir beberapa tahun terakhir ini telah melihat gelombang pertama dari teknologi kekayaan, jadi, konsep mengelola kekayaan, kekayaan pribadi dari skala apa pun, bukan? Dari aset pribadi hingga pasar publik. Tapi saya pikir ada sesuatu yang mulai merembes keluar dari Singapura, Anda bisa melihat kemunculan robot-robot penjaga di Vietnam, Filipina, dan sebagainya. Jadi, ada banyak edukasi pelanggan yang sedang berlangsung. Dari sudut pandang Anda, apa yang Anda lihat sebagai beberapa atribut yang diperlukan? Karena saya rasa Anda telah melihat banyak startup yang mati dalam fase edukasi pelanggan, beberapa perusahaan tampaknya berhasil melakukannya.

(11:05) Aaron Fu:

Saya secara egois, seperti kebanyakan orang, saya biasanya akan berinvestasi pada pengikut kedua atau ketiga terutama di pasar negara berkembang, terutama jika mereka mencoba memperkenalkan cara baru untuk melakukan sesuatu. Dan itu sebagian karena beberapa alasan, tapi salah satunya tidak seperti Singapura, di mana Anda bisa membayangkan semacam biro kredit sudah dibangun, sistem pembayaran sudah dibangun, sistem KYC sudah dibangun dengan sangat sering, jika Anda adalah penggerak pertama, katakanlah di e-commerce di Kenya, saya ingat Jumia harus membangun sistem logistik mereka sendiri, sistem pembayaran mereka sendiri, seluruh spektrum yang serupa. Jadi, ada banyak pengeluaran modal di muka di luar perangkat lunak dan di luar produk inti yang harus Anda investasikan jika Anda adalah pelopor dalam cara baru dalam melakukan sesuatu.

Sebagai penggerak kedua, penggerak pertama telah menjalankan semua layanan lainnya. Anda bisa dengan mudah masuk dan basis pelanggan sudah teridentifikasi. Jadi tentu saja saya merasa bahwa keuntungan sebagai penggerak pertama sangat sulit untuk dimanfaatkan. Saya pikir tantangan menarik lainnya yang terkadang kita lihat di Afrika dan beberapa pasar negara berkembang lainnya adalah gagasan bahwa ada banyak perusahaan dan perusahaan telekomunikasi yang dominan, terutama yang memiliki reputasi, baik atau tidak, meniru apa pun yang dilakukan oleh perusahaan rintisan dan menekan harga atau melibatkan pemerintah untuk mengubah peraturan dengan cara tertentu demi memastikan bahwa mereka menang, dan menurut saya ini juga menjadi tantangan yang terus menerus dihadapi oleh para wirausahawan yang baru masuk ke pasar dengan sebuah produk.

Contoh kasus bagi saya adalah, saya berteman baik dengan orang-orang yang meluncurkan produk yang setara dengan Lipa Na M-PESA, jadi pembayaran melalui M-PESA atau uang mobile di toko dibandingkan peer to peer, yaitu sebuah perusahaan bernama Kopo Kopo. Dan mereka mendapatkan begitu banyak daya tarik, bukan? Mereka meluncurkannya di pom bensin, seperti di supermarket dan semua tempat lainnya dan benar-benar meroket. Dan saya rasa, suatu hari perusahaan telekomunikasi yang dominan memutuskan bahwa ini harus menjadi bisnis kami. Dan kemudian langsung mendatangi semua nama merek perusahaan lokal yang besar dan mengatakan, Anda harus bekerja sama dengan kami. Kami akan membebankan biaya yang lebih murah. Kami akan menawarkan produk yang lebih unggul. Dan Anda akan mati. Kadang-kadang sangat sulit untuk menavigasi beberapa lingkungan ini. Jadi saya sangat menghormati siapa pun yang mencoba menghidupkan sesuatu, seperti di Afrika, saya pikir analogi umum untuk startup adalah membangun perusahaan seperti membangun pesawat saat Anda melompat dari tebing, bukan?

Saya pikir di Afrika, Anda melakukan hal tersebut dengan mata tertutup dan tangan terikat di belakang, itu sangat sulit. Jadi tidak ada yang lain selain kekaguman dan ya, empati untuk orang-orang yang mencoba membangun di luar sana. Dan itulah mengapa saya pikir saya benar-benar berusaha keras dan saya pikir banyak investor di Afrika berusaha keras untuk memastikan bahwa para pendiri didukung dengan baik karena pandangan yang ada di sana sangat keras.

(13:32) Jeremy Au:

Ya, saya rasa itu hal yang biasa, bukan? Maksud saya, misalnya, di Vietnam, ada sekelompok perusahaan rintisan di bidang teknologi finansial yang lisensinya dibekukan, bukan? Dan Anda menyebutnya sebagai tindakan regulasi dan sebagainya, tapi itu di satu sisi. Dan tentu saja, di seluruh Asia Tenggara, ada banyak hal seperti transfer pembayaran, transfer uang. Dan saya rasa banyak pemerintah yang terinspirasi oleh Singapura bahwa ini seharusnya menjadi sistem nasional dan tidak perlu ada penjaga tol. Jadi, untuk beberapa pasar di mana tidak ada pemain lokal yang efektif, maka, jelas, ada peningkatan yang sangat besar. Dan kemudian, misalnya, Vietnam, ada beberapa jalur pembayaran dominan yang berorientasi pada perusahaan dan startup. Dan ya, hal ini perlahan-lahan mulai menguap, karena, menurut saya, keputusan pemerintah, yang menurut saya adil dalam beberapa hal, tetapi juga, ini adalah risiko yang harus dipikirkan oleh para pendiri.

(14:11) Aaron Fu:

Ini jelas merupakan risiko bagi para pendiri. Saya pikir ini juga merupakan risiko bagi investor ventura. Jadi, saya rasa cerita yang lebih terkenal dan baru-baru ini terjadi di Lagos, Nigeria. Suatu hari mereka memutuskan bahwa mereka akan melarang ojek di kota tersebut. Setidaknya yang berbasis aplikasi. Dan tiba-tiba tiga perusahaan tidak memiliki bisnis. Mereka harus segera beralih ke bisnis pengiriman paket dan berharap bisa bertahan. Dan saya pikir, sekali lagi, sebagai investor ventura, Anda mendapat telepon dari LP Anda, apakah ini akan terjadi di semua pasar? Jadi, saya pikir banyak LP saya yang bertanya, mengapa Anda begitu tenang dengan semua ini? Saya bilang, ini pasti akan terjadi. Itu sudah diperhitungkan dalam model. Kami tahu bahwa ada 20 persen kemungkinan mereka akan menutup bisnis ini, namun perusahaan ini beroperasi di tiga atau empat pasar lain karena alasan tersebut. Mereka tidak akan menutup empat pasar secara bersamaan. Jadi ada cara untuk mengelola risiko tersebut, namun bagi orang-orang yang saya rasa lebih terbiasa dengan lingkungan regulasi yang lebih mudah diprediksi dan dapat diprediksi, ini adalah hal yang sangat sulit untuk dipahami.

(15:09) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Anda tahu, menurut saya ini menarik karena Anda menggunakan kata pasar, bukan? Jadi, beberapa pasar. Dan saya pikir bagi kebanyakan orang, mereka memiliki peta mental yang cukup jerawatan tentang Afrika. Jadi, ketika Anda mengatakan pasar, apakah Anda melihatnya dalam hal seperti kota? Pinggiran kota dan lingkungan, negara, wilayah? Bagaimana seharusnya kita berpikir tentang Afrika sebagai sebuah pasar tunggal? Saya kira benua. Tapi bagaimana kita harus berpikir tentang pelarian pasar? Ya,

(15:29) Aaron Fu:

Ya, saya rasa salah satu saran Anda untuk melihatnya sebagai kota-kota individual mungkin adalah yang paling tepat, bukan? Jadi saya pikir Lagos di Nigeria, di Afrika Barat, mungkin seperti salah satu yang paling berkembang, tetapi saya pikir kadang-kadang orang lebih suka menjual gagasan tentang keseluruhan negara Nigeria dalam hal jumlah penduduk, total PDB, tetapi saya pikir jika Anda, dan itu bagus dari perspektif TAM, tetapi jika Anda melihat siapa yang sebenarnya dapat kami layani dan siapa yang benar-benar membeli pembayaran digital dan siapa yang benar-benar menggunakan fasilitas e-niaga Anda, seperti semua itu ada di satu kota, bukan?

Jadi saya pikir pendekatan yang dipimpin oleh kota mungkin adalah pendekatan yang paling saya sukai. Mungkin memberikan pendengar Anda semacam tur singkat keliling benua. Saya rasa di Afrika Timur, Nairobi benar-benar selalu menjadi yang terdepan, entah itu karena M-PESA, uang mobile. Kota ini juga merupakan rumah bagi markas PBB terbesar di luar New York. Jadi biasanya ada banyak aktivitas internasional di sana. Banyak perusahaan Pan Afrika yang berdomisili di sana. Jadi sekali lagi, sangat mirip dengan cerita Singapura untuk Asia Tenggara. Jadi, Pan Afrika mendapat banyak manfaat dari hal itu. Saya pikir jelas di Afrika Selatan.

Afrika Selatan antara Johannesburg dan Cape Town. Keduanya merupakan dua ekosistem yang sangat kuat. Sekali lagi, sedikit berbeda dalam hal tertentu. Di Afrika Barat, Anda memiliki Lagos, Anda juga memiliki Accra, yang berada di sebelahnya, yang digambarkan banyak orang sebagai Lagos yang lebih tenang. Namun, pasarnya juga jauh lebih kecil. Kami telah melihat banyak pendiri yang meluncurkan produk di Accra untuk melakukan uji coba, dan setelah uji coba tersebut terbukti berhasil, mereka kemudian meluncurkan produk di Lagos dengan jam tangan seri A atau seri awal. Dakar, jadi Francophone Afrika adalah wilayah yang sangat kami minati, karena dalam banyak hal merupakan sub-wilayah terbesar, yang memiliki regulator yang sama, mata uang yang sama. Jadi Dakar dan Abidjan merupakan kota yang berkembang pesat, dengan hubungan yang erat dengan Eropa. Saya pikir jika Anda melihat Afrika Utara, saya pikir banyak dana yang memperlakukan Afrika Utara sebagai sub wilayah yang benar-benar terpisah juga, karena jika Anda melihat budaya, hubungan tahap perkembangan kota-kota, itu juga seperti jauh di atas sana, jadi Anda punya semacam Casablanca dan Maroko. Ada Kairo, yang menurut saya telah menyerap sekitar 25 hingga 30 persen dari seluruh dana yang masuk ke Afrika. Jadi Kairo adalah kota yang sangat berkembang.

Jadi menurut saya, pendekatan yang dipimpin oleh kota adalah pendekatan yang paling masuk akal karena Anda benar-benar mendesain untuk lingkungan tersebut. Tapi saya rasa itu tergantung pada sektor mana yang Anda bangun, bukan? Jadi, jika Anda membangun di bidang Agritech, tentu saja Anda ingin melihat lebih jauh ke luar kota karena di situlah basis pelanggan Anda. Namun bagi sebagian besar perusahaan, terutama jika perusahaan tersebut sedang membangun, saya rasa pendekatan yang dipimpin oleh kota mungkin yang paling masuk akal.

(17:52) Jeremy Au:

Mari kita bicara tentang berita utama, karena setiap kali saya membuka berita, saya pikir hanya ada tiga berita yang saya baca tentang Afrika. Jadi, yang pertama, tentu saja, adalah bahwa di Afrika, pertumbuhan populasinya sangat cepat. Demografi Tiongkok baru saja mulai melambat. India juga mulai melambat. Jadi pada tahun 2100, Afrika akan menjadi benua yang besar atau besar, banyak orang, TAM yang besar. Saya pikir itu adalah satu cerita.

Cerita kedua adalah, oh, ada krisis. Ada kekacauan politik. Ada pemberontakan. Ada kudeta. Jadi, berita-berita seperti inilah yang kita lihat.

Dan yang ketiga adalah, semacam kisah-kisah yang sangat menarik. Jadi seperti satu keluarga di Afrika yang mengalami pengalaman ini, entah itu positif atau negatif. Jadi, tiga hal tersebut adalah tiga jenis berita utama yang muncul di berita, jika saya membuka New York Times atau Wall Street Journal atau The Economist. Jadi saya hanya ingin tahu, menurut Anda bagaimana cerita Anda? Bagaimana Anda menggambarkan sisi pragmatis dari apa yang Anda lihat di Afrika?

(18:40) Aaron Fu:

Ngomong-ngomong, menurut saya, dua pengamatan pertama dan dua jenis cerita pertama sangat berkaitan erat. Jika Anda berpikir tentang ledakan populasi, tentu saja, hal itu sangat menarik. Ini akan menjadi tenaga kerja dunia selama beberapa dekade ke depan, begitu banyak hal yang terjamin dan saya pikir di luar jumlah orang, energi dan rasa lapar untuk sukses belum pernah terjadi sebelumnya. Dan saya tahu, seperti halnya orang-orang Tiongkok dan orang-orang dari anak benua Asia Selatan memiliki reputasi untuk bekerja sangat keras dan berjuang. Namun saya rasa saya telah melihat hal tersebut terjadi di Nigeria, Kenya, di mana orang-orang berjuang keras untuk menjadi sukses. Jadi saya pikir rasa lapar di kalangan anak muda untuk membuatnya berhasil adalah kekuatan yang sangat kuat.

Jika Anda melihat diaspora Nigeria dan Silicon Valley serta London, mereka memimpin banyak perusahaan dan benar-benar membuat kemajuan. Jadi, bagi saya, hal ini sangat menarik. Banyak dari mereka yang juga mulai terlibat dengan ekonomi internet untuk pertama kalinya, baik sebagai kreator maupun pengembang, Anda bisa melihat semacam itu, unicorn dan Andela yang ingin menciptakan dan mengembangkan tenaga kerja di Afrika untuk dunia. Jadi, saya benar-benar percaya bahwa semua upaya ini akan mengarah pada negara yang makmur secara ekonomi.

Namun, terhadap narasi kedua yang Anda miliki, hal ini juga memiliki risiko yang sangat besar karena jika kaum muda di Afrika tidak dapat menemukan pekerjaan dan pemenuhan serta makna yang mereka butuhkan, maka jelas mereka akan beralih ke para pemimpin mereka, jelas mereka akan beralih ke pekerjaan yang mungkin lebih tidak enak. Dan itu adalah risiko besar. Jika kita salah dalam menciptakan lapangan kerja di Afrika, dunia akan menanggung akibatnya. Ketika kita melihat para migran yang menaiki kapal untuk mencoba menyeberangi Mediterania, ketika kita melihat para migran Afrika yang mencoba mencapai Meksiko bahkan sampai ke Amerika Serikat, semua ini memiliki akar masalah. Dan akar penyebabnya adalah kemakmuran ekonomi domestik. Dan saya, entah bodoh atau tidak, percaya bahwa kunci untuk membuka kunci itu ada pada bakat mereka sendiri, bakat kewirausahaan mereka sendiri. Jadi, saya berinvestasi di banyak perusahaan yang mencoba membantu UKM menjadi lebih kuat, lebih tangguh, mencoba membantu mereka mendapatkan akses ke lebih banyak keuangan, karena saya pikir Afrika perlu menciptakan semacam pekerjaan untuk dirinya sendiri, tidak hanya sebagai perusahaan yang menguntungkan, tetapi sebagai kebutuhan bagi dunia untuk terus stabil.

(20:49) Aaron Fu:

Jadi, saya rasa narasi-narasi yang Anda sebutkan sangat masuk akal bagi saya. Saya rasa kisah saya di Afrika sendiri memiliki kisah yang sama, di mana saya merasa kisah tersebut benar-benar mengatur ulang bagaimana saya memandang kehidupan dan maknanya dan apa yang saya hargai dari teman dan apa yang saya hargai dari pekerjaan, dan hal tersebut memungkinkan saya untuk melakukan hal tersebut, bukan? Saya rasa Anda akan berempati bahwa dengan tinggal di Singapura, Anda ditakdirkan untuk menghargai hal-hal tertentu, entah itu apartemen yang bagus atau kedudukan dalam karier Anda, sampul Straits Times, atau apa pun itu, tapi saya rasa waktu di Kenya benar-benar membantu mengatur ulang hal tersebut bagi saya. Dan itu benar-benar luar biasa. Hal ini juga sangat sulit karena jelas saya harus hidup melalui beberapa serangan teror, yang sangat memukul rumah saya. Sebenarnya, saya kehilangan salah satu teman terbaik saya dalam serangan teror beberapa tahun yang lalu, dan kemarin sebenarnya adalah hari peringatannya. Dan hal itu mengubah perspektif saya tentang betapa singkatnya hidup ini dan apa yang harus kita lakukan dalam hidup ini.

(21:40) Jeremy Au:

Bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak detail tentang di mana dan mengapa serangan teror ini terjadi?

(21:44) Aaron Fu:

Ya, tentu. Ini sulit karena saya merasa ikut bertanggung jawab, tapi itu terjadi di hotel Dusit, yang, jika Anda mengenal Afrika, ada banyak kompleks seperti ini, seperti hotel plus kompleks perkantoran. Dan ada banyak orang bersenjata. Saya pikir mereka berasal dari Al Shabaab yang masuk dan mereka mengambil alih selama berhari-hari. Tiba-tiba ada satu malam di mana kami mendengar bahwa hal itu telah terjadi dan kami semua berusaha keras untuk memeriksa siapa yang ada di sana, siapa yang tidak ada di sana, siapa yang masih di sana. Dan mengapa hal ini sangat mengena di hati saya, selain karena teman saya, karena saya juga memiliki ruang kerja bersama di sana. Jadi saya memiliki beberapa karyawan yang juga berada di sana dan mereka mengurung diri mereka sendiri di ruang tersebut. Mereka saling berkirim pesan dengan panik. Dan itu sulit. Mereka tidak mengajarkan Anda bagaimana cara menghadapinya. Saya tentu saja tidak merasa diperlengkapi secara emosional untuk memahami bagaimana menghadapi hal ini.

Malam pun berlalu. Dan pada dasarnya kami mencoba menelepon setiap rumah sakit untuk mencari tahu di mana dia berada, di mana teman-teman kami. Dan ya, akhirnya, mereka menemukan mayatnya. Dan dia benar-benar keluar pada gelombang pertama. Jadi dia keluar dalam sebuah ledakan. Jadi setidaknya kami tahu bahwa itu tidak terlalu menyakitkan, itulah yang dikatakan para dokter kepada kami, tapi itu sulit. Dan saya dijadwalkan terbang untuk pertunangan lain 24 jam kemudian. Dan itu adalah perjalanan yang sangat suram ke bandara. Dan sejujurnya, saya pergi dengan perasaan tidak yakin apakah saya ingin kembali. Namun saya berpikir kembali pada poin saya sebelumnya tentang stabilitas dan lapangan pekerjaan serta kemakmuran ekonomi yang menjadi pendorong radikalisme, kecuali jika kita ada di sana untuk mencoba menyelesaikannya, hal ini akan terus berlanjut. Jadi ya, meninggalnya beliau juga menjadi katalisator bagi saya untuk memulai sebuah perusahaan modal ventura kecil dengan beberapa teman dan saya sendiri, karena ini adalah mimpinya. Dan namanya adalah Jason Spindler. Selalu menjadi mimpinya untuk memulai sebuah dana bersama kami semua. Jadi, paling tidak yang bisa kami lakukan adalah mencobanya.

Jadi kami senang karena kami bisa menghidupkannya juga. Dan itu menyenangkan, tapi ya, ini bukan tanpa tragedi dan saya bahkan tidak bisa menggambarkan reaksi keluarga dan teman-teman saya di Singapura juga. Rasanya seperti di luar dunia ini bagi mereka karena Anda membaca di berita dan selalu terlihat berbeda dua atau tiga tingkat dari kehidupan Anda sendiri. Dan itu berbeda ketika itu adalah orang-orang yang sangat dekat dengan Anda.

(23:52) Jeremy Au:

Wow. Itu sangat berat. Dan saya hargai Anda yang mau membagikannya. Maksud saya, hal pertama yang saya tanggapi adalah, Anda tidak bisa bertanggung jawab atas hal itu. Maksud saya, dia bekerja di coworking space dan tanggung jawabnya ada pada para penjahat dan orang-orang yang memutuskan untuk melakukan penyerangan. Maksud saya, Anda tahu, begitu,

(24:06) Aaron Fu:

Tentu saja, tetapi Anda tidak bisa melawan perasaan itu dalam pikiran Anda. Tapi seperti, Anda tahu, jika kami tidak berteman, jika saya tidak mengundangnya untuk datang bekerja di tempat itu, mungkin dia akan ada di sana, tapi kemudian kami tidak akan berteman. Dan itu juga akan menjadi hal yang menyebalkan. Jadi.

(24:17) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Itu cerita yang gila. Saya rasa itu adalah sesuatu yang ada di benak banyak orang, karena keamanan pribadi adalah salah satu keuntungan bekerja di AS. Banyak orang yang tinggal di Eropa, bahkan Singapura, orang ingin tinggal di sana. Jadi, keamanan dan risiko pribadi adalah bagian besar dalam pikiran orang-orang. Dan sejujurnya, hal ini menghalangi banyak orang untuk bekerja di pasar negara berkembang. Menurut Anda, bagaimana seharusnya orang-orang bersikap bijaksana terhadap dinamika tersebut?

(24:37) Aaron Fu:

Ya, saya pikir, dan ini akan menjadi generalisasi yang buruk, tetapi saya pikir pada umumnya, kebanyakan orang Singapura yang saya ajak bicara tentang peluang di Afrika mungkin melebih-lebihkan risikonya sekitar 10X lipat karena cerita yang mereka dengar. Saya pikir media sangat pandai dalam melebih-lebihkan aspek-aspek tertentu. Jadi saya hanya ingin mengatakan bahwa luangkanlah waktu Anda, bicaralah dengan lebih banyak orang yang pernah tinggal di sana atau yang pernah membangun bisnis di sana atau yang pernah menghabiskan waktu di sana. Lihat sendiri, rasakan sendiri dan segalanya akan menjadi lebih baik. Ketika saya berada di Kenya, saya memastikan bahwa setiap tahun, kami membawa beberapa peserta magang dari SMU atau dari Singapore Poly untuk merasakan pengalaman selama beberapa bulan karena mereka akan kembali dan menceritakannya kepada teman-teman mereka.

Dan tiba-tiba, karena seseorang yang menghabiskan waktu di sana, hal ini jauh lebih tidak berisiko. Saya juga ingat ketika pertama kali mendarat di Kenya. Saya mungkin salah satu orang Singapura yang ada di sana. Kami semua saling mengenal satu sama lain. Kami memiliki grup WhatsApp yang sama. Itu adalah komunitas yang sangat dekat, tetapi kami selalu bertanya-tanya mengapa tidak ada lebih banyak lagi. Jadi saya akan mengatakan bahwa ini adalah risiko yang harus ditanggung, bukan? Saya rasa Nairobi jelas jauh lebih aman daripada beberapa negara lain di sekitarnya. Jadi pilihlah. Saya teringat ketika Standard Chartered pertama kali menawarkan untuk mengirim saya ke Afrika. Ya, saat itu Lagos yang pertama. Dan saya ingat HR mengirimkan banyak sekali pilihan apartemen yang berbeda, namun tidak ada foto kamar tidur. Yang ada hanyalah foto pagar, generator dan pasokan air. Saya seperti, Ya Tuhan. Tapi itu hanya untuk menunjukkan apa yang menjadi fokusnya.

Jadi, Anda tahu, saya pikir ini hanya berfokus pada hal-hal yang bisa saja salah, tetapi saya pikir jauh lebih baik untuk menghabiskan hati dan pikiran Anda pada hal-hal yang akan berjalan dengan baik, seperti apa yang akan terjadi jika pengalaman saya menjadi sangat positif? Ini semacam, Anda mengelola risiko Anda sendiri, bukan? Saya akan mengatakan hal-hal seperti jika Anda baru pertama kali ke benua ini, jangan langsung mendarat di Mogadishu. Saya pikir itu ide yang buruk. Jangan lakukan itu. Mendaratlah di Nairobi, tolong, Anda tahu, ajaklah orang untuk berkeliling bersama Anda.

(26:28) Jeremy Au:

Ya. Sebelum kita beralih ke bab berikutnya, apa nama dana VC mikro itu dan mungkin situs web di mana orang dapat menghubungi jika mereka ingin ikut serta?

(26:35) Aaron Fu:

Tentu. Ya. Ya, namanya Sherpa Ventures dan situs webnya sherpa.africa.

(26:40) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi pada bab berikutnya, yang ingin saya tanyakan adalah, bisakah Anda berbagi tentang saat-saat Anda secara pribadi merasa berani?

(26:45) Aaron Fu:

Selain itu, satu. Bagi saya, ketika saya merenungkan tentang keberanian, ini adalah tentang menyadari bahwa ada hal-hal yang tidak dapat saya kendalikan dan ada hal-hal yang dapat saya kendalikan. Bagi saya, ketika saya berbicara tentang pergi ke bandara hari itu, tidak kembali, saya pikir saat pertama kali mendarat kembali ke Afrika setelah hal itu terjadi, bagi saya itu mungkin salah satu momen paling berani dalam beberapa tahun terakhir. Menurut saya, untuk bisa menerima kenyataan itu, Anda harus mengambil risiko pribadi. Keluarga Anda harus memahami bahwa Anda mengambil risiko tersebut karena itu bukan hanya hak Anda untuk mengambil risiko tersebut, bukan? Semua orang di sekitar Anda juga harus menerima hal tersebut bersama Anda dan melakukan percakapan nyata dengan mereka seperti, saya mengerti bahwa Anda menganggap risiko ini tidak perlu, namun saya perlu memberi tahu Anda tentang mengapa hal ini penting bagi saya.

Jadi saya pikir ada dua lapisan untuk itu. Yang pertama adalah mengambil langkah untuk kembali. Dan yang kedua adalah memastikan bahwa orang-orang di sekitar saya juga merasa nyaman dengan hal itu dan berjuang lebih keras dari sebelumnya untuk memastikan bahwa Afrika mendapatkan modal, bakat, dukungan, dan perhatian yang tepat yang dibutuhkan untuk berkembang.

Ya, dan menjadikannya sebuah misi. Jadi menurut saya, itulah ceritanya. Tidak terlalu spesifik, tapi ya.

(27:49) Jeremy Au:

Saya pikir yang menarik adalah, Anda telah menyebutkan tentang memeriksa keluarga dan orang-orang yang Anda cintai, dan saya tahu bahwa Anda baru saja menjadi seorang ayah. Jadi saya hanya ingin tahu tentang mungkin, apakah menjadi orang tua telah mengubah cara pandang Anda terhadap misi dan dampaknya karena saya tahu hal itu terjadi pada saya. Saya hanya ingin tahu bagaimana perubahannya bagi Anda.

(28:04) Aaron Fu:

Menurut saya, hal yang paling indah dari menjadi orang tua adalah bahwa hal ini menggeser garis waktu Anda secara signifikan ke masa depan. Saya rasa sebelum Daniel hadir dalam kehidupan kami, saya berpikir dalam dua, tiga dekade ke depan, sekarang saya lebih nyaman untuk berpikir satu abad ke depan. Dunia seperti apa yang ingin kami ciptakan untuknya? Produk apa yang harus ada pada masanya? Teknologi apa yang akan ada di masanya? Dan tata kelola apa yang akan ada di sekitar teknologi pada saat itu, bukan? Jadi, hal ini sangat membantu saya untuk memprioritaskan pekerjaan yang saya lakukan, para pendiri yang saya pilih untuk menghabiskan waktu bersama mereka, dan tim yang saya pilih untuk mengelilingi diri saya dan bekerja bersama mereka.

Dan ini hanya memfokuskan perhatian Anda pada dunia yang ingin Anda ciptakan dalam 50 hingga 100 tahun mendatang. Ya, 50 tahun, 100 tahun lagi, bukan? Dan itu untuknya. Bukan untuk saya lagi. Jadi, ya, hal ini tentu saja mengubah selera risiko tersebut. Saya tentu saja menantikan bagaimana jadwal perjalanan saya sekarang setelah dia ada dalam kehidupan kami dan dia bisa menghabiskan lebih banyak waktu di rumah. Tapi ya, saya pikir bisa merenungkan dunia seperti apa yang ingin Anda ciptakan untuknya dalam seratus tahun ke depan mungkin adalah perubahan terbesar.

(29:08) Jeremy Au:

Ketika Anda berpikir tentang 100 tahun ke depan, menurut Anda apa yang pasti akan terjadi? Dan menurut Anda, apa yang tidak pasti akan terjadi?

(29:14) Aaron Fu:

Saya pikir signifikansi Afrika dalam hal dampak terhadap ekonomi global akan terasa, dan saya menggunakan kata dampak karena saya tidak tahu, saya pikir juri masih belum menentukan apakah itu positif atau negatif, tetapi ada momentum yang luar biasa untuk menjadikannya positif seperti yang kita harapkan. Dalam hal yang tidak saya yakini adalah dalam seratus tahun ke depan, saya tidak yakin demokrasi liberal yang telah memimpin selama ini akan menjadi model pemerintahan yang dominan, seperti di dunia atau bentuk pemerintahan yang paling dihormati di dunia, dan bagian itu benar-benar membuat saya khawatir. Karena saya pikir kita menerima begitu saja dalam kehidupan kita bahwa tentu saja ada kecenderungan umum menuju pemerintahan yang lebih demokratis, kecenderungan umum menuju lebih banyak, saya kira pemerintahan sosialis, tapi itu belum tentu bagaimana sejarah akan berjalan. Dan itu mungkin sesuatu yang saya saksikan sangat dekat dengan Anda. Dan saya pikir hal tersebut sangat berkaitan dengan kemakmuran ekonomi juga. Saya pikir ketika Anda memiliki ekonomi di mana kaum muda tidak melihat jalan keluar, Anda akan berakhir dalam situasi dengan pemimpin yang buruk. Pemimpin yang buruk hanya akan melanggengkan diri mereka sendiri dan ketika Anda memiliki seluruh wilayah dengan pemimpin yang buruk selama beberapa dekade, Anda menempatkan dunia dalam risiko.

Jadi, mungkin itulah hal yang kurang saya yakini, tetapi saya yakin seratus persen bahwa Afrika akan memiliki dampak besar pada ekonomi dunia dalam satu cara, bentuk, atau wujud. Entah dari perspektif bakat, atau dari perspektif penciptaan ide, dari perspektif energi bersih, bukan? Ada begitu banyak hal yang terjadi di benua ini, dan itu sangat luar biasa.

(30:37) Aaron Fu:

Saya juga harus memiliki portofolio malaikat saya yang juga sangat diarahkan pada keberlanjutan dan iklim akhir-akhir ini. Dan baru-baru ini saya berinvestasi di sebuah perusahaan di Kenya yang melakukan penangkapan karbon di udara secara langsung. Dan saya percaya bahwa karena geologi Kenya yang unik yang terletak di patahan gunung berapi dengan energi panas bumi yang hampir tak terbatas, jika dilakukan dengan benar, mereka dapat menyedot begitu banyak karbon dari udara dengan energi yang sepenuhnya terbarukan dan menciptakan ekonomi yang berkembang dengan melakukan hal tersebut, bukan? Kami memiliki kesempatan untuk melakukannya dengan benar dan itu membuat saya sangat berharap. Hal ini membuat saya sangat berharap dan saya harap Anda tahu lebih banyak investor dan lebih banyak orang yang mulai melihat peluang ini.

(31:15) Jeremy Au:

Bagus. Terima kasih banyak telah berbagi. Untuk itu, saya ingin mengakhiri acara ini dengan merangkum tiga hal penting yang saya dapatkan dari acara ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang bagaimana Anda masuk ke FinTech, modal ventura, dan pasar negara berkembang, terutama Afrika. Saya pikir sangat menarik untuk mendengar tentang keputusan karir individu yang Anda buat, tetapi juga saya pikir beberapa manfaat pribadi dan misi serta parameter yang Anda pikirkan untuk melakukan lompatan itu.

Kedua, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang Afrika sebagai sebuah pasar. Saya pikir sangat menarik untuk melihatnya dalam hal diskusi tentang apakah ini merupakan tingkat kota versus wilayah versus negara versus benua. Jadi saya pikir sangat menarik untuk melihat pertukaran dalam hal total pasar yang dapat disesuaikan. Saya juga menyebutkan tentang konektivitas, stabilitas politik, serta peluang pasar dan persaingan pasar lokal. Jadi menarik untuk melihat beberapa dinamika serupa di pasar negara berkembang, misalnya, dengan perubahan peraturan pemerintah, serta perusahaan telekomunikasi lokal yang bersaing, atau Sherlocking atau bersaing dengan perusahaan rintisan lokal.

Terakhir, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang pengalaman pribadi Anda. Saya sangat menghargai seberapa banyak Anda berbagi tentang persahabatan Anda dengan rekan kerja Anda yang sayangnya meninggal dunia dalam serangan teroris tersebut. Saya pikir ini adalah refleksi yang serius tentang fakta bahwa pasar negara berkembang, ada risiko di setiap pasar, tetapi ada juga tujuan dan misi yang kuat di balik investasi dan membawa modal. Saya pikir sangat istimewa bahwa Anda berbagi tentang mengapa Anda melakukannya, yaitu untuk 100 tahun ke depan tentang berinvestasi di masa depan di mana ada pemimpin yang kuat, institusi yang kuat, bakat yang kuat, dan ekonomi yang kuat untuk memberikan masa depan yang lebih baik bagi masyarakat. Untuk itu, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi kisah Anda, Aaron.

(32:44) Aaron Fu:

Terima kasih, Jeremy atas kesempatannya. Saya telah mendengarkan Anda hampir setiap hari dalam perjalanan saya ke Connecticut dan merupakan sebuah mimpi untuk bisa berbincang dengan Anda. Jadi, terima kasih telah berbagi cerita saya.