Trasy Lou: Uber & Atome GM Launching Markets, Motherhood vs. Entrepreneurship, and Fintech Founder Learnings - E381

· Podcast Episodes,Women,Founder

 

“Hire for potential. Don't hire for what you have done. And why I say that is nobody actually wanted to do things that they have done over and over again, but more on doing things a little bit different, a little bit harder every single . time, Hire them now so that we can groom them to do the next thing that they might not have thought about.” - Trasy Lou

“What I always say to a team is to set stretch goals and unleash their potential. We make the team grow together and make sure that everyone is doing something that they're passionate about.As a leader, we have to support the team to reach a goal that they think is impossible. Once they reach that goal, they would feel so good ans that they’ve grown a lot in the role. It’s super important when building teams and putting people in the right spot in an area that they love doing and giving them stretched tasks that they feel so good about after they have accomplished it.” - Trasy Lou

“A market launcher usually likes to move around. They love to share knowledge, but at the end, they need to find someone local that understands the local nuances to really move the country forward to the next stage. So I really like that setup. At Atome, when we're launching in different countries, there are a couple of members in the regional team to help the GM or even to hire the GM to make sure that we could have a local person to be in charge of the country to make it successful. So that really accelerates the growth.” - Trasy Lou

Trasy Lou, Cofounder & CEO of Fluid, and Jeremy Au discussed three main topics:

1. Uber & Atome GM Launching Markets: Trasy highlighted the mission-driven culture at Uber, the importance of data-driven decision-making, and the autonomy she had as a GM. Her time as GM at two growth-stage startups exemplified the resilience required to lead teams towards a shared mission. She also discussed the unique challenges of market launching, emphasizing the value of playbook sharing across countries to avoid reinventing the wheel and accelerate growth. Key insights included setting stretch goals, hiring for potential, and fostering a flat organizational structure for open communication

2. Fintech Founder Learnings: Trasy discussed how she founded Fluid, a flexible financing solution for B2B purchases, amidst a funding winter. She outlined the challenges and learning curves associated with fundraising and starting a fintech startup during economically tough times. She dispelled common misconceptions about fintech, specifically the differences between consumer and B2B fintech solutions. She also gave her advice on fundraising, highlighting the need for preparation and strategic timing.

3. Balancing Motherhood & Entrepreneurship: Trasy shared her personal journey of balancing the roles of a GM, founder, and mother. Her experiences during critical moments at Uber, including having her water break during a conference call, underscored the underestimated strength of women in leadership positions. She emphasized the importance of support systems, both within organizations and at home, for successful entrepreneurship and parenthood.

Jeremy and Trasy also talked about scaling across different geographies, hiring for potential to build effective teams, and securing debt facilities in fintech.

Supported by HDMall

HD Mall is a healthcare marketplace in Southeast Asia connecting patients to over 1,800 medical providers. This covers multiple categories such as dental, aesthetics, and elective surgeries. Over 300,000 patients have accessed more affordable healthcare via HD Mall. Get yourself a well-deserved health checkup. If you're in Thailand, go to hdmall.co.th. If you're in Indonesia, go to hdmall.id.

(01:30) Jeremy Au:

Hey, Trasy, really excited to have you on the show. I'd love for you to introduce yourself.

(01:34) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, sure. Well, thank you for inviting me to this show Jeremy. So my name is Trasy. I'm currently the CEO and Cofounder of Fluid, which is flexible financing for B2B purchases. And I am also a mother of three young kids and prior to building Fluid full time, which is February 2023, I was a regional General Manager of Atome, the leading Buy Now ,Pay Later Fluid company across different markets in Asia.

(01:55) Jeremy Au:

So how did you first get into technology?

(01:57) Trasy Lou:

Wow. That was back in 2015. After I graduated from my MBA in Hong Kong, I wanted to have a change after my MBA to really get into a different industry because my background is actually hospitality. I'm originally from Macau. After my graduation, I just worked in like hotel industry. So it was super, I would say, like a very different background versus a lot of other entrepreneurs. So after my MBA, I decided to make a change and that's how I got a role at Uber, as a GM of Macau.

(02:28) Jeremy Au:

What was the experience at Uber like? I mean, those were the early days and very busy. So could you share a little bit more about that?

(02:33) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, definitely. I think joining Uber is really a life changing experience. And if you talk to any ex-Uber, they will probably tell you the same. It's really an experience where it's hard to replicate and why I really love my experience there it's because I really see a few good things at Uber.

Number one is it's a very mission-driven organization. So when you go to work, you will feel that everybody is actually driving towards the same mission, which is to make transportation as reliable as running water. I still remember that mission. And even though it's really difficult, at that time, 2015, 2014 when taxi was still having, it's still having a lot of powers in a lot of countries, it was tough.

You will see police coming to the office asking us questions but then the next day, like the team would just come back to work and say, Hey, you know, let's fight for this mission again. So that really changes my thought about how to actually run a company. It's how do we actually get these talents that are so aligned with a mission to really drive that mission forward. And I still remember when I was eight months pregnant and I was doing a campaign for Macau, which is to fight with the government to legalize ride-sharing. I gather like tens of thousands of letters from different residents and march to the government office to really deliver the letters together with our drivers, partners. So that doesn't happen lightly but that is the mission that I see that everybody is trying to work towards. So that's number 1.

I think the other thing that I really like about Uber and really as a GM, it's an organization where we make decision with numbers. So every morning everyone would go to work and the first thing that we would do is really to open what we call is like heaven, where you will see your numbers very clearly. You will see your supplies, whether you have enough drivers, you have enough vehicles on the road to meet the demand. And you would see different cars in different areas on the map, and that's the first thing you do even when you're like biting your egg sandwich, drinking your coffee, but that's the first thing that you need to do. So I think that also changes or maybe instill the importance of making decisions with numbers in my career after. And I would say as a GM there, you have a lot of autonomy. You are the one that's driving the decisions for your country. So that really gives people a lot of power and the sense of impact and belonging in the organization.

(04:47) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. So what's interesting is that, you know, you were a GM and you were having your first child during the entire experience. Could you share a little bit more about what that was like?

(04:56) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, women are actually stronger than what we thought. I still remember I had my last conference call while my water broke.

(05:04) Jeremy Au:

Whoa.

(05:05) Trasy Lou:

During a conference call. And I still remember my Operations Manager, who is a male, was like, "Whoah, let's go to the hospital, go rush there now." But that was quite interesting. But women are really stronger than what we thought. And we could really do whatever it takes and work harder towards a mission that you believe in. So I would say it's not as hard as what we thought as long as we really love what we do and really believe that we are making an impact.

But of course, you know, the organization also gave a lot of support, flexible working hours, which I believe is super important for women to be successful, especially even after giving birth, you have to breastfeed and also that the team is super open about breastfeeding, pumping during meetings, which, as long as you don't mind, which I don't, I think that is an understanding that we need to have for women to be successful in a workplace.

And I still remember, since I was actually the only female GM at Uber in APAC at that time and also I was the only married one with a child, raising children, it's kind of like a foreign concept to a lot of male GMs at that time, but they gained the understanding, and that I think it's understanding that as a female leader that you can actually share with some of your male co-workers.

(06:20) Jeremy Au:

Could you share a little bit more about your reflections on what it takes to be an effective GM? Because, you know, you were a GM twice, right? Once at Uber and once at Atome. So, what are your thoughts about what makes an effective GM?

(06:31) Trasy Lou:

Yeah number one, I think that's always what I say to a team is set stretch goal and unleash your potential. I think how we actually make the team grow together is to make sure that everyone is doing something that they're passionate about, but really set a goal that they feel is impossible, or close to impossible to reach, but as a leader to give them everything that we can to support them to reach that goal. And once they reach that goal, they would feel so good about themselves. They would feel that they have grown a lot in the role. So I think that that is super important when building teams and really putting people in the right spot in area that they love doing, but really give them stretched tasks that they feel so good about after they have accomplished it. I think that's really important as a leader, it's how do you actually support your team to reach the potential that they didn't think that they could do. I think that's definitely number one.

And I would say number two is to hire for potential. Don't hire for what you have done. And why I say that is nobody actually wanted to do things that they have done over and over again, but more on doing things a little bit different, a little bit harder every single time, so we always look for people that have potential to take the next step, but hire them now so that we can groom them to do the next thing that they think they might not have thought about.

So as a leader, it's very important for us to really identify the passionate potential in that candidate or in that team member and put them in the right role. So I think that's the second thing. And I would say the third thing is autonomy. I'd like to stress that we need to build a very flat organization where everybody's ideas are heard, and everybody's voice is heard. Maybe they're at the very front, or maybe like a lower level that actually are very close to the customers, where as leader, we always have to hear from our employees from our customer perspective, what they think of how to change your product, how to actually innovate, improve the organization. So I do believe that having a flatter structure, open communications, letting everybody speak their mind is super important as a leader.

(08:33) Jeremy Au:

How do you think that GMs are measured from your perspective?

(08:36) Trasy Lou:

Wow. That's a very good questions. There are a few things that I, I think are important. Number one, of course, it's a commercial metrics, like whether you're driving your GME, your revenue, whether you're making money, you're in economics, you know, all that. Second would be the satisfaction of your team, whether you're able to retain talents, whether you're able to attract talents, and that can be measured with some of the metrics like retention or the quality of work from your team.

And I think number three is really about measuring the GM with the big picture and long-term thinking. I see a lot of great GMs that are more focusing on the current, but not really making decisions for the future of the company. So I think not, not just reaching the commercial goals in a shorter term, but thinking about what's next, what is the path to get to the mission? What is the path to actually really drive to the vision of the company? That requires measuring in every single GM of the country.

(09:27) Jeremy Au:

What's interesting is that, you know, there's lots of companies that have GMs and they also have market launching, right? Which is an activity, but also a separate role. Previously we had a guest called Ashwin. He came on to share by his experience being a market launcher for Lime and other kind of companies across the region. Could you share a little bit more about that because, you know, there's a different phase right in the market entry and there's a GM, you know, so how do you think about that?

(09:49) Trasy Lou:

I love the idea of market launcher, and that's also a program that I have launched together with my boss at Atome who was the CEO of Atome. What I love about that was because when I was a GM at Uber, the market launcher actually share a lot of playbooks from the other countries for me, so that I was able to actually take those with playbooks and localize that for my country and there are tons of good learnings at Uber from the other countries as well. So there's no reason for any new GM to reinvent the wheel. And at Uber, one thing that they did very well was there's like a central location where you can see, oh, you know, this country run this campaign and this is how it's measured. And so everybody can actually read about those great campaigns and localize that for the country and even actually invite the person in charge of that campaign or in certain countries to come over.

So I think that actually accelerates the growth of every single GM in the other countries with the market launcher. And also, it also takes a different DNA of a market launcher versus a GM, whereas the market launcher usually like to move around. They love to share the knowledge but at the end, they need to find someone local that understand the local nuances to really move the country forward to the next stage. So I do really like that setup. So that's why at Atome, when we're launching the different countries, and there are a couple of members in the regional team to help the GM or even to hire the GM to make sure that we could have a local person to be in charge of the country to make it successful. So I really love the idea and that really accelerates the growth.

(11:18) Jeremy Au:

Is there a transition point from market launch towards more of a GM mentality or is it more of like a spectrum?

(11:24) Trasy Lou:

I would say, I would say that at least at Uber, the market launcher is a different person so that it's more like the market launcher kind of transfer all the knowledge and playbooks that he knows to the GM, and then he would pretty much go to the next country. And that's how Uber was able to actually launch, I think like hundreds of countries within a very short time. So as a GM, basically, when you're hired, you're already thinking how to actually make this country grow faster or hit the next milestone. So I would say the mentality of a GM is it's to be owning the country, everything in every single aspect, P&L, people, hiring, culture .Whereas the launcher is pretty much, it's a salaries, the growth of the GM to be successful in that role.

(12:06) Jeremy Au:

You've been a GM at one, you know, like you said, a travel and transportation company and the second being, you know, a FinTech company. So any differences from your perspective?

(12:16) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, definitely a lot. So when I joined Uber, it was 2015. It was relatively big in the U. S. already, and APAC was just starting where I could learn a lot from the other country's GMs and everybody's super smart. Whereas when I joined Atome, I was the first GM and when I joined, we actually just had a product so it was at a very different stage.

I still remember we were doing like $3,000 GMV per month when I joined and yeah, so when I left, it was like nine-digit US dollars GMV per month. So it's actually grown really fast and it's the real scaling a product from zero to one. But I do think that even at Uber versus Fintech, which is the Buy Now, Pay Later, the differences is that I had to actually learn a lot about finance.

I had to learn a lot about how different financial product works and also banking partnerships and all that, but there are actually, surprisingly, a lot of similarities. So how to actually grow the business is very similar. Some of the strategies we could actually use from Uber versus Atome because for Uber, like when I was running Uber Eats, I actually run both Uber Eats and Uber rides. Uber Eats is like a three -dimensional marketplaces, whereas Atome is the same. Like we have, merchants, we have our product, we have our users, same for Uber Eats, like there's restaurants the eaters and the products. So scaling that marketplace, what we call, you know, it's a marketplace, is relatively similar in our strategy. So, I would say that the knowledge is something that I need to learn from a financial, industrial perspective but growing the business, the perspective about growing the business are quite similar.

(13:52) Jeremy Au:

So what's interesting is that since then you've decided to build your own company. Could you share a little bit more about why you decided to found Fluid?

(13:58) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, definitely. I think it's a, it's an area that has a lot of potential that we can unlock. So how I got this idea was when I was working at Atome, there are merchants asking, Hey, can you actually do an installment for our business customers? So just, just for everybody's benefit, Fluid is actually a, you can call it like B2B Buy Now, Pay Later, but we do more than that. We're a flexible financing for B2B purchases where the buyers can pay now and they can also pay with credit terms. We only focus on B2B, our marketplaces and suppliers. And we have like checkout that can be integrated with a website. We also can be integrated with marketplaces or even traditional supply invoicing systems whereas the suppliers or the suppliers would get paid pretty much immediately after the goods are delivered. So our unique selling point is that the suppliers give us a fee and they don't have to worry about accounts receivables, collection, and they don't have to talk to lenders for lending money, that's a borrowing, to borrow money to actually give credit terms to their buyers.

So without end to end solutions, they can pretty much grow the business without thinking about accounts receivable or getting loans from the third party. So that's a concept, but why I got the idea was like, go back to the reason was when I was at Atome, the merchants are asking whether we could have the installment plan for the B2B customers. Then I started thinking, oh okay, maybe there's like a good opportunity and started to talk with potential customers and realize that there are also similar startups in the US and Europe that raise a bunch of money and doing quite well. And that's why I decided to take a leap of faith to do something by myself.

But of course, that also has a bit related to like timing and my co-founder, at the same time, my co-founder who used to be the head of product in Atome in the very early stage, he even joined earlier than I did and also had a FinTech product in Coupang in Korea. Kim reached out to me and said, Hey, Trasy, you want to do something together? So I'm like, Oh, okay, great. I have a good co-founder. I have a good idea. And I believe that's the right time for me to start my own company. So I took a leap of faith.

(15:55) Jeremy Au:

Amazing. So you took a leap of faith, and what's the difference between being a GM versus being a founder from your perspective?

(16:01) Trasy Lou:

Oh, growing the business pretty much is the same. But I think the only area that I feel very unsure, really didn't know about is fundraising. So being a founder, I had to not just think about how to grow the business, how to build a team, which was the role of a GM, but how to make the company survive, how to have enough money to keep the ball rolling.

And that actually took up significant amount of my time to network with VCs, network with founders, making sure that we have a plan to have sufficient capital to grow our business. I think that's the part that I had to learn from scratch. And the other thing is, as a founder, you tend to, or at least myself, tend to worry a lot more at the beginning. You would be like, Oh, what if I fail? What if the team members I hired cannot make it? Well, we cannot make it and we kind of failed the team members that believe in us. You know, I think that sense of responsibility was quite strong at the beginning.

But of course, after two months, I decided not to think about that and just to focus on building the business and getting the money in.

(17:04) Jeremy Au:

What advice would you give to founders who are preparing to fundraise, especially for our first time founders?

(17:09) Trasy Lou:

I made so many mistakes along the way. I would say that the strategy of fundraising is to get all the VCs to say yes or no at the same time, so you can actually have your leverage in negotiation. So, Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Actually we, we had fundraise twice. Number one. The first time was back in March, like early March, 2023 when we first started. And I, the first mistake that I made was I didn't really prepare a very nice deck. I was just like, Oh, this is what we're going to do. And let's actually, actually put a few slides together and let's talk to Sequoia, Sequoia, which I was like, I changed my you know, my position to founder and somebody reached out to me and he said, Hey, let's talk. Your background's interesting.

So without even thinking of preparing my pitch, we spoke to Sequoia, and of course, that was a failure because they asked a lot of questions that we didn't think about, and I didn't know how to answer. So number one is really prepare very well and rehearse with an experienced VC like Jeremy or like founders that are experiencing in fundraising to give you advice of how to actually make the pitch better.

And then the second thing is there's the timing is to think about which, how long does this VC actually take time to make the decision versus some others. Some VCs are very fast. Some VCs took a little bit longer time, so how do you actually time it in a way where you can make a number of more than like maybe five or ten VCs to say yes or no at the same time? I think that needs a little bit of strategic thinking. So number one is really a lot of preparation. Number two is to time is to make the timing of the VCs discussion strategically. So those would be my two pieces of advice based on my mistakes that I've made.

(18:48) Jeremy Au:

Well, I myself, as a first time founder have made those mistakes as well. So, you know, I think it's a function of the fact that as founders, we are geared to work first and build first. And it's a different activity motion for the fundraising side as well.

(19:00) Trasy Lou:

Yeah.

(19:00) Jeremy Au:

Looking forward, you know, can you share a little bit more about some of the dynamics of Fluid and how the business works?

(19:06) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, definitely. So our mission is really to simplify B2B payments. So at the tap of a button, your B2B purchases will be financed. So what we really wanted to do is to help the suppliers and buyers to get financing easier and not, not just financing, but also pay now.

So I think now we, I would like to say that we are at a stage where we see early product market fit and we are scaling our business with the first version of our product and so I really look forward to 2024 with some of the VCs that really believe in us and investing in us, and of course, angel investors as well.

So looking at 2024, we really wanted to use this product as a scale the market. And also identify a few, industries that we would really like to be a leader in. So that would be the goal of 2024.

(19:54) Jeremy Au:

There's a lot of lending in Southeast Asia. You mentioned Atome, which is Buy Now, Pay Later on the consumer credit side. There's also the B2B on the lending side. How should founders and operators think about building a lending business in Southeast Asia?

(20:07) Trasy Lou:

Wow, that's a very, very, very good questions. A caveat is I am still learning. Definitely there are new knowledge that I gain every day running this business, but at least from my experience from Atome, running a successful lending business really has two fronts. Number one is raising sufficient debt facility to really scale the business. When I was at the told me one of the competitors strategy or at least when we see why some of the competitors are not doing as well as they were actually they were not able to secure the debt facility and that funding to scale the business. So when they actually go and talk to merchants, they might not be able to support the books that they have currently, so that really, Atome, they had a really experienced team of finance leadership that is experienced with raising that capital and also have strong partnership with banks. So that really enabled the growth of the business. So number one is really get the debt facility, plan early, build that relationship early, and really need to get the debt locally to ensure that we have the best cost of funding and also not having the exchange currency risk. So that's number one.

And of course, the second thing is risk, managing the risk is super important in the lending business. And how do we actually build a robust model? What kind of data are unique to your model that the other lenders don't have? I think that that really enables us to maintain the par 30, par 60 or, and also the default rate at a manageable level so that we are able to continue to get that facility, continue to get these bank partnerships and further scale the growth. So I do believe that those two are super important in the lending business.

(21:38) Jeremy Au:

Any myths or misconceptions that you think exist about building a fintech company in Southeast Asia?

(21:44) Trasy Lou:

Oh I think maybe I can share a little bit about the context of of Fluid when we first started fundraising. And we started fundraising at the funding winter and also right after the consumer BNPL saying, hey, the economics was hard and like the valuation of partner, like, really fell quite significantly. So, common things I heard from the VCs. Oh, now you're building a similar product, but in the B2B space how,, they would actually compare us with like a consumer side, but when we're thinking about a B2B space, it's really solving a completely different problem where we're, you're thinking about us as like a more like a trade financing product than like a consumer lending product so that I think that's, there's a number one misconception that we have, some of the VCs have or other people have when we're speaking to them. So when we're looking at Fluid versus Consumer BNPL why we're solving a different problem is every single time when you trade, when you buy products as a business to grow your your business, you know, to offer your service to the customers.

You really need credit terms. And when we looking at numbers, over 70% of the consumer of the merchants of the businesses actually need credit terms to run the business. So that is an essential part of the equation to make the business successful. So I think the misconception is always to compare us with consumer BNPL outside where when we're actually solving a different problem.

And and going back to your question about FinTech, I was saying, like, FinTech, I think, at least for my conversations with the VCs is still an area that we do believe in, and a lot of VCs believe in and we have seen successful FinTech company, quite a lot actually in Asia, for example, like Aspire or like, NEOM, you know, those, those are really successful fintech and a lot of VCs still have a strong hope in this area and how we can make it successful.

(23:30) Jeremy Au:

Looking ahead, what do you think are important aspects? Because you've done the market entry side. You've done the fintech side. You've done the lending side. Do lending businesses scale well across different geographies?

(23:41) Trasy Lou:

It really depends on how you build a risk model. So that's why we're very intentional when building a risk model in one country versus the other is to make, is to making sure what aspects can be scalable across different markets. So, even Atome, I think the sources of information could be different, but how the model works could be very similar. So that is the part that we focus on scalability, whereas the sources of information would be different across different countries. So I think that's definitely the area that we could scale, but when you're looking at, of course, managing risk across different markets in Asia, very different for example, in emerging markets, we have to pay a lot more attention to fraud, whereas in developed market, probably the attention to fraud could be slightly less. So those are the nuances that we look at when we go to different markets.

(24:25) Jeremy Au:

Could you share about a time that you personally have been brave?

(24:27) Trasy Lou:

Yeah. Yeah. Thanks for asking that. Definitely it's really to start a startup during the funding winter when everybody, VC, founders, friends, family asked me not to do it, but I do actually see a lot of benefits in starting startup in a funding winter. A number one is there a lot of talents. I found that it's a lot easier to hire great talents now versus when everybody is actually building a company. And now, we have unfortunately ops across different really great tech companies around the world, and these talents are actually looking to do the best next thing. And how do we actually attract them to the company? It's super important, but that actually also position us in the current situation, position us in a better, uh, in a better time to actually attract this talent to join startups. I think that's number one.

The other thing is a lot of great startups are born out of the winter season and that actually make the founders a lot more cautious or disciplined in using the fund and really make cautious decision of what we are actually taking next. So I do think that there are a lot of good things coming out from this funding winter. And I do believe that the next unicorn or like next Amazon will be actually coming out of this this time.

(25:38) Jeremy Au:

I'll say another thing that we've discussed before that has been brave is that if you've chosen to become a mother of three kids while also being a founder as well. So I'm kind of curious about how that's going.

(25:49) Trasy Lou:

Yeah, it's really great. Actually, I'm not even joking here. I know it sounds difficult, but it's been actually really great. There are actually, I would say a number of reasons why or how we make it work. Number one, I think as a female entrepreneur, you need to pick the right partner in the household. So you need to have a very supportive husband to really make it work. So, so for my case, when I was working for a company, my husband was running his own startup or his own company. And now he's not, so I feel like we kind of switched roles. And then he is in a more I would say, a more stable role where he was able to spend more time with the family, with the kids.

Our kids are like age three, five and seven, still very young, but we were actually able to switch role in different stages of our life. And I think that's super important for any female founder to plan the career is to plan together with your partner. And I do think that it will be a very difficult situation when both partners, the couples are actually running their own business or having a very demanding job, and that would not be very good for the well being of the children. So, picking the right partner would be important in building your business. And also, I think the timing would be quite important.

I think the second reason why I think it's great is because my kids are now three, five, seven, and Singapore has very good education system where the kids can go to school for the whole day after they turn three, four especially so the demand of a mother is, I would say different. It's not like we have to still breastfeed and which I was intentional of starting the business while all the kids are coming out of the diaper and not breastfeeding. And also when my husband has a bit more stable role so I think those kinds of support system are super important to be in place before starting a business as a female founder, especially as a mother.

(27:34) Jeremy Au:

I think, you know, it's not just for women, but also for men, right? I think a lot of them are pretty scared about setting up families because they know they're founders, like, you know, so much busy, you can't focus on your family or it's going to take you away from your work. Any words of advice for people who are, you know, kind of exciting, whether to set up a family or not, or whether it's be a founder or not in the context of setting up a family.

(27:54) Trasy Lou:

I would say, my piece of advice to, or at least from my experience is don't start it too late. I do think that a lot of you know, some of my friends are thinking about it and then like, then it could be too late to have children especially for women. I do believe that we are really stronger than what we think we are and as long as we are disciplined with our time, good with our time management, I do believe that we will be able to do both you know, having the great support system at home choosing the right partners. So, I would say, looking at my career, after my MBA, I switched to a tech industry, and then I was also quite intentional in looking for a partner to build a family. And because I know that I was late 20s, actually, like if you're looking at the time right now is I also started out a little bit earlier, having children, but I love the timing because now my kids have grown up and it's my time to shine, you know, I have a family.

I have a I have kids but at the same time, I'm building my own startup. So I think that when the kids are at a certain age, they can go to school by themselves and that's really the best time to do it. But I think for men, you guys a little bit more flexible because the women are the one that have to do the duties sometimes that the men unfortunately cannot help. But I do think that having a family make you more disciplined and also plan ahead in terms of your career and how to really work together as a team to make this really successful.

(29:16) Jeremy Au:

Thank you so much for sharing. On that note, I'd love to summarize the three big takeaways I got from the conversation. First of all, thank you so much for sharing about what's it like to be a GM at both Uber and Atome. It was fascinating to hear about your advice about how to be successful at a job, how the job should be measured, and also what are the key dimensions of market launching versus being responsible for the country versus how to hire for the country team. So really fascinating set of experiences and advice there.

Secondly, thank you so much for sharing about Fluid and what you're thinking in terms of FinTech. And what's it like to build a fintech startup during a funding winter? And also a lot of experiences about what you think are the myths and misconceptions about lending, risk management, and also your own personal advice of how fintech startups should go about fundraising and learn what they need to learn to be strategic in their approach.

Lastly, thanks for sharing about the entire time as a personal journey both as a, like you said, a GM who had their water break during the conference call, all the way to becoming a mother of three kids, but also choosing to be a founder as well. So thank you for that very honest conversation. I love what you said that women are stronger than they think. And I think there's some very good and personal advice about how to be thoughtful about both family planning, as well as career planning, as well as choosing to build a new startup on that note.

Thank you so much, Trasy, for sharing your experience.

(30:33) Trasy Lou:

Thank you. Thanks for inviting me over, Jeremy. Really great sharing some of the experience that I had and hope it's useful for some of the people that are thinking to start a company.

"Rekrutlah orang yang berpotensi. Jangan merekrut untuk apa yang telah Anda lakukan. Dan mengapa saya mengatakan itu adalah karena tidak ada seorang pun yang benar-benar ingin melakukan hal-hal yang telah mereka lakukan berulang kali, tetapi lebih kepada melakukan hal-hal yang sedikit berbeda, sedikit lebih sulit setiap saat, Rekrut mereka sekarang sehingga kita dapat mempersiapkan mereka untuk melakukan hal berikutnya yang mungkin tidak terpikirkan oleh mereka." - Trasy Lou

 

"Apa yang selalu saya katakan kepada tim adalah untuk menetapkan tujuan yang lebih tinggi dan mengeluarkan potensi mereka. Kami membuat tim tumbuh bersama dan memastikan bahwa setiap orang melakukan sesuatu yang mereka sukai, sebagai pemimpin, kami harus mendukung tim untuk mencapai tujuan yang menurut mereka tidak mungkin. Begitu mereka mencapai tujuan tersebut, mereka akan merasa sangat senang karena mereka telah berkembang pesat dalam peran tersebut. Sangatlah penting ketika membangun tim dan menempatkan orang-orang di tempat yang tepat di area yang mereka sukai dan memberikan mereka tugas yang menantang sehingga mereka merasa sangat senang setelah menyelesaikannya." - Trasy Lou

"Seorang pelopor pasar biasanya suka berpindah-pindah. Mereka senang berbagi pengetahuan, tetapi pada akhirnya, mereka perlu menemukan seseorang yang memahami nuansa lokal untuk benar-benar memajukan negara ini ke tahap berikutnya. Jadi, saya sangat menyukai pengaturan itu. Di Atome, saat kami meluncurkan di berbagai negara, ada beberapa anggota di tim regional untuk membantu GM atau bahkan mempekerjakan GM untuk memastikan bahwa kami dapat memiliki orang lokal yang bertanggung jawab atas negara tersebut agar berhasil. Jadi hal tersebut benar-benar mempercepat pertumbuhan." - Trasy Lou

Trasy Lou, Co-Founder & CEO Fluid, dan Jeremy Au membahas tiga topik utama:

1. Peluncuran Pasar Uber & GM Atome: Trasy menyoroti budaya yang digerakkan oleh misi di Uber, pentingnya pengambilan keputusan berdasarkan data, dan otonomi yang ia miliki sebagai GM. Pengalamannya sebagai GM di dua perusahaan rintisan yang sedang dalam tahap pertumbuhan menunjukkan ketangguhan yang dibutuhkan untuk memimpin tim menuju misi bersama. Dia juga membahas tantangan unik dalam peluncuran pasar, menekankan nilai berbagi pedoman di berbagai negara untuk menghindari penciptaan ulang dan mempercepat pertumbuhan. Wawasan utama termasuk menetapkan tujuan yang lebih luas, merekrut orang yang berpotensi, dan membina struktur organisasi yang datar untuk komunikasi yang terbuka.

2. Pembelajaran Pendiri Fintech: Trasy membahas bagaimana ia mendirikan Fluid, solusi pembiayaan fleksibel untuk pembelian B2B, di tengah musim dingin pendanaan. Ia menguraikan tantangan dan kurva pembelajaran yang terkait dengan penggalangan dana dan memulai startup fintech selama masa-masa sulit secara ekonomi. Dia menghilangkan kesalahpahaman umum tentang fintech, khususnya perbedaan antara solusi fintech konsumen dan B2B. Ia juga memberikan sarannya tentang penggalangan dana, menyoroti perlunya persiapan dan waktu yang strategis.

3. Menyeimbangkan Peran Sebagai Ibu dan Kewirausahaan: Trasy membagikan perjalanan pribadinya dalam menyeimbangkan peran sebagai GM, pendiri, dan ibu. Pengalamannya selama masa-masa kritis di Uber, termasuk ketika ia mengalami pecah ketuban saat melakukan panggilan konferensi, menggarisbawahi kekuatan perempuan yang diremehkan dalam posisi kepemimpinan. Ia menekankan pentingnya sistem pendukung, baik di dalam organisasi maupun di rumah, untuk keberhasilan kewirausahaan dan menjadi orang tua.

Jeremy dan Trasy juga berbicara tentang penskalaan di berbagai wilayah geografis, perekrutan untuk potensi untuk membangun tim yang efektif, dan mendapatkan fasilitas utang di fintech.

(01:30) Jeremy Au:

Hai, Trasy, sangat senang sekali Anda bisa hadir di acara ini. Saya ingin Anda memperkenalkan diri.

(01:34) Trasy Lou:

Ya, tentu saja. Terima kasih telah mengundang saya ke acara ini, Jeremy. Jadi nama saya Trasy. Saat ini saya adalah CEO dan Co-Founder Fluid, yang merupakan pembiayaan fleksibel untuk pembelian B2B. Dan saya juga seorang ibu dari tiga anak kecil dan sebelum membangun Fluid secara penuh waktu, yaitu pada bulan Februari 2023, saya adalah General Manager regional Atome, perusahaan Beli Sekarang, Bayar Nanti Fluid terkemuka di berbagai pasar di Asia.

(01:55) Jeremy Au:

Jadi, bagaimana Anda pertama kali terjun ke dunia teknologi?

(01:57) Trasy Lou:

Wow. Itu terjadi pada tahun 2015. Setelah saya lulus dari MBA saya di Hong Kong, saya ingin melakukan perubahan setelah MBA saya untuk benar-benar masuk ke industri yang berbeda karena latar belakang saya sebenarnya adalah perhotelan. Saya berasal dari Macau. Setelah lulus, saya hanya bekerja di industri perhotelan. Jadi itu sangat luar biasa, menurut saya, seperti latar belakang yang sangat berbeda dengan banyak pengusaha lainnya. Jadi setelah meraih gelar MBA, saya memutuskan untuk melakukan perubahan dan itulah bagaimana saya mendapatkan peran di Uber, sebagai GM Macau.

(02:28) Jeremy Au:

Seperti apa pengalaman di Uber? Maksud saya, saat itu adalah masa-masa awal dan sangat sibuk. Jadi bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang hal itu?

(02:33) Trasy Lou:

Ya, tentu saja. Saya rasa bergabung dengan Uber benar-benar merupakan pengalaman yang mengubah hidup saya. Dan jika Anda berbicara dengan mantan karyawan Uber, mereka mungkin akan mengatakan hal yang sama. Ini benar-benar pengalaman yang sulit untuk ditiru dan mengapa saya sangat menyukai pengalaman saya di sana, karena saya benar-benar melihat beberapa hal baik di Uber.

Pertama, Uber adalah organisasi yang sangat digerakkan oleh misi. Jadi, ketika Anda pergi bekerja, Anda akan merasa bahwa semua orang benar-benar bekerja untuk mencapai misi yang sama, yaitu membuat transportasi yang dapat diandalkan seperti air yang mengalir. Saya masih ingat misi itu. Dan meskipun sangat sulit, pada saat itu, 2015, 2014 ketika taksi masih memiliki, masih memiliki banyak kekuatan di banyak negara, itu sulit.

Anda akan melihat polisi datang ke kantor dan mengajukan pertanyaan kepada kami, namun keesokan harinya, tim akan kembali bekerja dan berkata, Hei, Anda tahu, ayo kita perjuangkan misi ini lagi. Jadi hal tersebut benar-benar mengubah pemikiran saya tentang bagaimana cara menjalankan sebuah perusahaan. Bagaimana kita bisa mendapatkan talenta-talenta yang sangat selaras dengan misi untuk benar-benar mendorong misi tersebut ke depan. Dan saya masih ingat ketika saya hamil delapan bulan dan saya melakukan kampanye untuk Macau, yaitu berjuang dengan pemerintah untuk melegalkan ride-sharing. Saya mengumpulkan sekitar puluhan ribu surat dari penduduk yang berbeda dan berbaris ke kantor pemerintah untuk benar-benar mengantarkan surat-surat tersebut bersama para mitra pengemudi kami. Jadi hal itu tidak terjadi dengan mudah, tetapi itulah misi yang saya lihat sedang diupayakan oleh semua orang. Jadi itu adalah nomor 1.

Saya pikir hal lain yang sangat saya sukai dari Uber dan sebagai GM, ini adalah sebuah organisasi di mana kami mengambil keputusan dengan angka-angka. Jadi setiap pagi semua orang akan berangkat kerja dan hal pertama yang kami lakukan adalah membuka apa yang kami sebut sebagai surga, di mana Anda akan melihat angka-angka Anda dengan sangat jelas. Anda akan melihat persediaan Anda, apakah Anda memiliki cukup pengemudi, Anda memiliki cukup kendaraan di jalan untuk memenuhi permintaan. Dan Anda akan melihat mobil yang berbeda di area yang berbeda di peta, dan itulah hal pertama yang Anda lakukan bahkan ketika Anda sedang menggigit roti isi telur, meminum kopi, tetapi itulah hal pertama yang perlu Anda lakukan. Jadi saya pikir hal itu juga mengubah atau mungkin menanamkan pentingnya membuat keputusan dengan angka-angka dalam karier saya setelahnya. Dan menurut saya, sebagai GM di sana, Anda memiliki banyak otonomi. Andalah yang membuat keputusan untuk negara Anda. Jadi hal ini benar-benar memberikan banyak kekuatan dan rasa memiliki dampak dan rasa memiliki dalam organisasi.

(04:47) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi yang menarik adalah, Anda tahu, Anda adalah seorang GM dan Anda memiliki anak pertama Anda selama seluruh pengalaman itu. Bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang bagaimana rasanya?

(04:56) Trasy Lou:

Ya, wanita sebenarnya lebih kuat dari apa yang kita pikirkan. Saya masih ingat saat saya melakukan panggilan konferensi terakhir saat air ketuban saya pecah.

(05:04) Jeremy Au:

Whoa.

(05:05) Trasy Lou:

Selama panggilan konferensi. Dan saya masih ingat Manajer Operasional saya, yang seorang pria, berkata, "Wah, ayo pergi ke rumah sakit, cepat ke sana sekarang." Tapi itu cukup menarik. Namun, perempuan benar-benar lebih kuat dari yang kita kira. Dan kami benar-benar dapat melakukan apa pun dan bekerja lebih keras untuk mencapai misi yang kami yakini. Jadi menurut saya, hal ini tidak sesulit yang kita pikirkan selama kita benar-benar mencintai apa yang kita lakukan dan benar-benar percaya bahwa kita membuat dampak.

Tapi tentu saja, Anda tahu, organisasi ini juga memberikan banyak dukungan, jam kerja yang fleksibel, yang saya yakini sangat penting bagi wanita untuk menjadi sukses, terutama setelah melahirkan, Anda harus menyusui dan juga bahwa tim sangat terbuka tentang menyusui, memompa selama rapat, yang, selama Anda tidak keberatan, yang mana saya tidak keberatan, saya pikir itu adalah pemahaman yang perlu kita miliki agar wanita bisa sukses di tempat kerja.

Dan saya masih ingat, karena saya adalah satu-satunya GM perempuan di Uber di Asia Pasifik pada saat itu dan juga saya adalah satu-satunya yang sudah menikah dan memiliki anak, membesarkan anak, ini seperti konsep yang asing bagi banyak GM laki-laki pada saat itu, tetapi mereka mendapatkan pemahaman, dan menurut saya ini adalah pemahaman bahwa sebagai pemimpin perempuan, Anda dapat berbagi dengan rekan kerja laki-laki.

(11:18) Jeremy Au:

Apakah ada titik transisi dari peluncuran pasar ke arah mentalitas GM atau lebih seperti spektrum?

(11:24) Trasy Lou:

Menurut saya, setidaknya di Uber, market launcher adalah orang yang berbeda, sehingga lebih seperti market launcher mentransfer semua pengetahuan dan pedoman yang dia ketahui kepada GM, dan kemudian dia akan pergi ke negara berikutnya. Dan begitulah cara Uber dapat benar-benar meluncurkan, saya rasa ratusan negara dalam waktu yang sangat singkat. Jadi sebagai seorang GM, pada dasarnya, ketika Anda dipekerjakan, Anda sudah berpikir bagaimana caranya agar negara ini bisa berkembang lebih cepat atau mencapai tonggak sejarah berikutnya. Jadi menurut saya, mentalitas seorang GM adalah memiliki negara ini, segala sesuatu dalam setiap aspek, P&L, orang-orang, perekrutan, budaya, sedangkan pelopornya cukup banyak, yaitu gaji, pertumbuhan GM untuk menjadi sukses dalam peran tersebut.

(12:06) Jeremy Au:

Anda pernah menjadi GM di satu perusahaan, seperti yang Anda katakan, sebuah perusahaan perjalanan dan transportasi dan yang kedua, perusahaan FinTech. Jadi, apakah ada perbedaan dari sudut pandang Anda?

(12:16) Trasy Lou:

Ya, tentu saja banyak. Jadi ketika saya bergabung dengan Uber, saat itu tahun 2015. Saat itu Uber sudah cukup besar di Amerika Serikat, dan APAC baru saja dimulai, di mana saya bisa belajar banyak dari para GM di negara lain dan semua orangnya sangat pintar. Sedangkan ketika saya bergabung dengan Atome, saya adalah GM pertama dan ketika saya bergabung, kami baru saja memiliki sebuah produk, jadi kami berada pada tahap yang sangat berbeda.

Saya masih ingat ketika saya bergabung, kami menghasilkan sekitar $3.000 GMV per bulan, dan ketika saya keluar, GMV kami sudah mencapai sembilan digit dolar AS per bulan. Jadi, sebenarnya kami berkembang sangat cepat dan ini adalah penskalaan produk yang sesungguhnya dari nol menjadi satu. Tapi saya pikir bahkan di Uber versus Fintech, yang merupakan Beli Sekarang, Bayar Nanti, perbedaannya adalah saya harus benar-benar belajar banyak tentang keuangan.

Saya harus belajar banyak tentang cara kerja produk keuangan yang berbeda dan juga kemitraan perbankan dan sebagainya, tetapi sebenarnya, secara mengejutkan, ada banyak kesamaan. Jadi, cara mengembangkan bisnis sebenarnya sangat mirip. Beberapa strategi yang bisa kami gunakan dari Uber versus Atome, karena untuk Uber, seperti saat saya menjalankan Uber Eats, saya sebenarnya menjalankan Uber Eats dan Uber rides. Uber Eats itu seperti pasar tiga dimensi, sedangkan Atome juga sama. Seperti yang kami miliki, merchant, produk kami, pengguna kami, sama halnya dengan Uber Eats, seperti ada restoran, pemakan, dan produk. Jadi untuk menskalakan marketplace, yang kami sebut sebagai marketplace, strategi kami relatif sama. Jadi, menurut saya, pengetahuannya adalah sesuatu yang perlu saya pelajari dari sisi finansial, industri, tetapi menumbuhkan bisnis, perspektif tentang menumbuhkan bisnis itu sangat mirip.

(13:52) Jeremy Au:

Jadi yang menarik adalah sejak saat itu Anda memutuskan untuk membangun perusahaan Anda sendiri. Bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang mengapa Anda memutuskan untuk mendirikan Fluid?

(13:58) Trasy Lou:

Ya, tentu saja. Saya pikir ini adalah area yang memiliki banyak potensi yang bisa kita buka. Jadi bagaimana saya mendapatkan ide ini adalah ketika saya bekerja di Atome, ada pedagang yang bertanya, Hei, bisakah Anda melakukan cicilan untuk pelanggan bisnis kami? Jadi, hanya untuk keuntungan semua orang, Fluid sebenarnya adalah, Anda bisa menyebutnya seperti B2B Beli Sekarang, Bayar Nanti, tapi kami melakukan lebih dari itu. Kami adalah pembiayaan yang fleksibel untuk pembelian B2B di mana pembeli dapat membayar sekarang dan mereka juga dapat membayar dengan persyaratan kredit. Kami hanya fokus pada B2B, pasar dan pemasok kami. Dan kami memiliki pembayaran yang dapat diintegrasikan dengan situs web. Kami juga dapat diintegrasikan dengan marketplace atau bahkan sistem faktur pasokan tradisional dimana pemasok atau supplier akan dibayar segera setelah barang dikirim. Jadi nilai jual unik kami adalah bahwa pemasok memberi kami biaya dan mereka tidak perlu khawatir tentang piutang, penagihan, dan mereka tidak perlu berbicara dengan pemberi pinjaman untuk meminjamkan uang, itu adalah pinjaman, meminjam uang untuk benar-benar memberikan persyaratan kredit kepada pembeli mereka.

Jadi tanpa solusi menyeluruh, mereka bisa mengembangkan bisnis tanpa memikirkan piutang atau mendapatkan pinjaman dari pihak ketiga. Jadi itu adalah sebuah konsep, tapi mengapa saya mendapatkan ide tersebut, kembali ke alasannya adalah ketika saya masih di Atome, para merchant bertanya apakah kami bisa memiliki paket cicilan untuk pelanggan B2B. Kemudian saya mulai berpikir, oh oke, mungkin ada peluang yang bagus dan mulai berbicara dengan calon pelanggan dan menyadari bahwa ada juga startup serupa di Amerika Serikat dan Eropa yang mengumpulkan banyak uang dan melakukannya dengan cukup baik. Dan itulah mengapa saya memutuskan untuk mengambil lompatan keyakinan untuk melakukan sesuatu sendiri.

Namun tentu saja, hal ini juga sedikit berkaitan dengan waktu dan co-founder saya, pada saat yang sama, co-founder saya yang dulunya adalah kepala produk di Atome pada tahap paling awal, dia bahkan bergabung lebih awal daripada saya dan juga memiliki produk FinTech di Coupang di Korea. Kim menghubungi saya dan berkata, Hei, Trasy, apakah kamu ingin melakukan sesuatu bersama? Jadi saya seperti, Oh, oke, bagus. Saya punya co-founder yang baik. Saya punya ide yang bagus. Dan saya yakin ini adalah waktu yang tepat bagi saya untuk memulai perusahaan saya sendiri. Jadi aku mengambil lompatan iman.

(15:55) Jeremy Au:

Luar biasa. Jadi Anda mengambil sebuah lompatan besar, dan apa perbedaan antara menjadi GM dengan menjadi pendiri dari sudut pandang Anda?

(16:01) Trasy Lou:

Oh, mengembangkan bisnis hampir sama saja. Namun saya rasa satu-satunya area yang saya merasa sangat tidak yakin, benar-benar tidak tahu adalah penggalangan dana. Jadi sebagai seorang pendiri, saya tidak hanya harus memikirkan bagaimana mengembangkan bisnis, bagaimana membangun tim, yang merupakan peran seorang GM, tetapi bagaimana membuat perusahaan bertahan, bagaimana memiliki cukup uang untuk menjaga agar bola tetap berputar.

Dan hal tersebut benar-benar menyita banyak waktu saya untuk berjejaring dengan VC, berjejaring dengan para pendiri, memastikan bahwa kami memiliki rencana untuk memiliki modal yang cukup untuk mengembangkan bisnis. Saya pikir itu adalah bagian yang harus saya pelajari dari awal. Dan hal lainnya adalah, sebagai pendiri, Anda cenderung, atau setidaknya saya sendiri, cenderung lebih khawatir di awal. Anda akan berpikir, Oh, bagaimana jika saya gagal? Bagaimana jika anggota tim yang saya rekrut tidak bisa melakukannya? Ya, kita tidak bisa berhasil dan kita seperti mengecewakan anggota tim yang percaya pada kita. Anda tahu, saya rasa rasa tanggung jawab itu cukup kuat pada awalnya.

Namun tentu saja, setelah dua bulan, saya memutuskan untuk tidak memikirkan hal itu dan hanya fokus membangun bisnis dan mendapatkan uang.

(17:04) Jeremy Au:

Apa saran yang akan Anda berikan kepada para pendiri yang sedang mempersiapkan penggalangan dana, terutama bagi para pendiri yang baru pertama kali melakukannya?

(17:09) Trasy Lou:

Saya melakukan begitu banyak kesalahan di sepanjang jalan. Menurut saya, strategi penggalangan dana adalah membuat semua VC mengatakan ya atau tidak pada saat yang sama, sehingga Anda bisa memiliki pengaruh dalam negosiasi. Jadi, ya. Ya. Ya. Sebenarnya kami, kami melakukan penggalangan dana dua kali. Yang pertama. Pertama kali pada bulan Maret, sekitar awal Maret, 2023 ketika kami pertama kali memulai. Dan saya, kesalahan pertama yang saya lakukan adalah saya tidak benar-benar menyiapkan dek yang bagus. Saya hanya berpikir, Oh, inilah yang akan kita lakukan. Dan mari kita benar-benar, benar-benar menyusun beberapa slide dan mari kita bicara dengan Sequoia, Sequoia, yang mana saya seperti, saya mengubah posisi saya menjadi pendiri dan seseorang menghubungi saya dan berkata, Hei, mari kita bicara. Latar belakang Anda menarik.

Jadi tanpa berpikir untuk mempersiapkan presentasi saya, kami berbicara dengan Sequoia, dan tentu saja, itu adalah sebuah kegagalan karena mereka mengajukan banyak pertanyaan yang tidak kami pikirkan, dan saya tidak tahu bagaimana cara menjawabnya. Jadi, nomor satu adalah benar-benar mempersiapkan diri dengan sangat baik dan berlatih dengan VC yang berpengalaman seperti Jeremy atau para pendiri yang berpengalaman dalam penggalangan dana untuk memberi Anda saran tentang cara membuat presentasi yang lebih baik.

Dan yang kedua adalah waktu yang harus dipikirkan, berapa lama waktu yang dibutuhkan oleh VC ini untuk membuat keputusan dibandingkan VC lainnya. Beberapa VC sangat cepat. Beberapa VC membutuhkan waktu yang sedikit lebih lama, jadi bagaimana Anda mengatur waktu sedemikian rupa sehingga Anda bisa membuat lebih banyak VC daripada lima atau sepuluh VC untuk mengatakan ya atau tidak pada saat yang bersamaan? Saya rasa hal tersebut membutuhkan sedikit pemikiran strategis. Jadi nomor satu adalah persiapan yang matang. Nomor dua adalah mengatur waktu diskusi dengan VC secara strategis. Jadi itu adalah dua saran saya berdasarkan kesalahan yang pernah saya buat.

(18:48) Jeremy Au:

Saya sendiri, sebagai pendiri pertama kali juga pernah melakukan kesalahan-kesalahan itu. Jadi, Anda tahu, saya pikir ini adalah fungsi dari fakta bahwa sebagai pendiri, kita diarahkan untuk bekerja terlebih dahulu dan membangun terlebih dahulu. Dan ini adalah gerakan aktivitas yang berbeda untuk sisi penggalangan dana juga.

(Trasy Lou:

Ya.

(19:00) Jeremy Au:

Ke depannya, bisakah Anda berbagi sedikit lebih banyak tentang beberapa dinamika Fluid dan bagaimana bisnis ini bekerja?

(19:06) Trasy Lou:

Ya, tentu saja. Jadi misi kami benar-benar untuk menyederhanakan pembayaran B2B. Jadi hanya dengan mengetuk satu tombol, pembelian B2B Anda akan dibiayai. Jadi apa yang benar-benar ingin kami lakukan adalah membantu para pemasok dan pembeli untuk mendapatkan pembiayaan dengan lebih mudah dan tidak hanya membiayai, tetapi juga membayar sekarang.

Jadi saya pikir sekarang kami, saya ingin mengatakan bahwa kami berada pada tahap di mana kami melihat kecocokan pasar produk awal dan kami meningkatkan skala bisnis kami dengan versi pertama produk kami dan jadi saya sangat menantikan tahun 2024 dengan beberapa VC yang benar-benar percaya pada kami dan berinvestasi pada kami, dan tentu saja, investor malaikat juga.

Jadi, melihat tahun 2024, kami benar-benar ingin menggunakan produk ini sebagai alat untuk mengukur pasar. Dan juga mengidentifikasi beberapa industri yang benar-benar ingin kami jadikan sebagai pemimpin. Jadi itu akan menjadi tujuan di tahun 2024.

(19:54) Jeremy Au:

Ada banyak pinjaman di Asia Tenggara. Anda menyebutkan Atome, yaitu Beli Sekarang, Bayar Nanti di sisi kredit konsumen. Ada juga B2B di sisi pinjaman. Bagaimana para pendiri dan operator harus berpikir untuk membangun bisnis pinjaman di Asia Tenggara?

(20:07) Trasy Lou:

Wow, itu pertanyaan yang sangat, sangat, sangat bagus. Sebagai catatan, saya masih terus belajar. Pastinya ada pengetahuan baru yang saya dapatkan setiap hari dalam menjalankan bisnis ini, tapi setidaknya dari pengalaman saya di Atome, menjalankan bisnis pinjaman yang sukses memiliki dua sisi. Pertama, mengumpulkan fasilitas pinjaman yang cukup untuk benar-benar mengembangkan bisnis. Ketika saya berada di salah satu strategi kompetitor atau setidaknya ketika kami melihat mengapa beberapa kompetitor tidak melakukan sebaik mereka, mereka sebenarnya tidak dapat memperoleh fasilitas utang dan pendanaan untuk meningkatkan skala bisnis. Jadi ketika mereka benar-benar pergi dan berbicara dengan pedagang, mereka mungkin tidak dapat mendukung pembukuan yang mereka miliki saat ini, sehingga benar-benar, Atome, mereka memiliki tim kepemimpinan keuangan yang sangat berpengalaman yang berpengalaman dalam meningkatkan modal tersebut dan juga memiliki kemitraan yang kuat dengan bank. Jadi hal itu benar-benar memungkinkan pertumbuhan bisnis. Jadi nomor satu adalah benar-benar mendapatkan fasilitas utang, merencanakan lebih awal, membangun hubungan lebih awal, dan benar-benar perlu mendapatkan utang secara lokal untuk memastikan bahwa kami memiliki biaya pendanaan terbaik dan juga tidak memiliki risiko nilai tukar mata uang. Jadi itu nomor satu.

Dan tentu saja, hal kedua adalah risiko, mengelola risiko adalah hal yang sangat penting dalam bisnis pinjaman. Dan bagaimana kita benar-benar membangun model yang kuat? Data seperti apa yang unik pada model Anda yang tidak dimiliki oleh pemberi pinjaman lain? Saya rasa hal tersebut benar-benar memungkinkan kami untuk mempertahankan par 30, par 60, dan juga default rate pada tingkat yang dapat dikelola sehingga kami dapat terus mendapatkan fasilitas tersebut, terus mendapatkan kemitraan dengan bank-bank ini, dan terus meningkatkan pertumbuhan. Jadi saya percaya bahwa kedua hal tersebut sangat penting dalam bisnis pinjaman.

(21:38) Jeremy Au:

Adakah mitos atau kesalahpahaman yang menurut Anda ada dalam membangun sebuah perusahaan fintech di Asia Tenggara?

(21:44) Trasy Lou:

Oh, mungkin saya bisa berbagi sedikit tentang konteks Fluid saat pertama kali memulai penggalangan dana. Dan kami memulai penggalangan dana pada musim dingin pendanaan dan juga tepat setelah BNPL konsumen mengatakan, hei, ekonomi sedang sulit dan seperti valuasi mitra, seperti, benar-benar jatuh cukup signifikan. Jadi, hal-hal umum yang saya dengar dari para VC. Oh, sekarang Anda sedang membangun produk yang serupa, tetapi di ruang B2B bagaimana,, mereka akan benar-benar membandingkan kami dengan sisi konsumen, tetapi ketika kami berpikir tentang ruang B2B, itu benar-benar memecahkan masalah yang sama sekali berbeda di mana kami, Anda berpikir tentang kami lebih seperti produk pembiayaan perdagangan daripada produk pinjaman konsumen sehingga menurut saya itu, ada kesalahpahaman nomor satu yang kami miliki, beberapa VC miliki atau orang lain miliki ketika kami berbicara dengan mereka. Jadi, ketika kita melihat Fluid versus Consumer BNPL, mengapa kita memecahkan masalah yang berbeda adalah setiap kali Anda berdagang, ketika Anda membeli produk sebagai bisnis untuk mengembangkan bisnis Anda, Anda tahu, untuk menawarkan layanan kepada pelanggan.

Anda benar-benar membutuhkan persyaratan kredit. Dan ketika kita melihat angka-angka, lebih dari 70% konsumen dari pedagang bisnis sebenarnya membutuhkan persyaratan kredit untuk menjalankan bisnis. Jadi, itu adalah bagian penting dari persamaan untuk membuat bisnis sukses. Jadi saya rasa kesalahpahamannya adalah selalu membandingkan kami dengan konsumen BNPL di luar sana, padahal sebenarnya kami memecahkan masalah yang berbeda.

Dan kembali ke pertanyaan Anda tentang FinTech, saya katakan, FinTech, menurut saya, setidaknya dalam percakapan saya dengan para VC, masih menjadi area yang kami percayai, dan banyak VC yang percaya dan kami telah melihat perusahaan FinTech yang sukses, cukup banyak di Asia, misalnya, seperti Aspire atau NEOM, Anda tahu, itu adalah fintech yang sangat sukses dan banyak VC yang masih memiliki harapan yang besar di area ini dan bagaimana kami dapat membuatnya sukses.

(23:30) Jeremy Au:

Ke depannya, menurut Anda apa saja aspek-aspek yang penting? Karena Anda telah melakukan sisi masuk pasar. Anda telah melakukan sisi fintech. Anda telah melakukan sisi peminjaman. Apakah bisnis peminjaman dapat berkembang dengan baik di berbagai wilayah geografis?

(Trasy Lou:

Itu benar-benar tergantung pada bagaimana Anda membangun model risiko. Jadi, itulah mengapa kami sangat berhati-hati saat membangun model risiko di satu negara dengan negara lainnya, yaitu untuk memastikan aspek apa yang dapat diskalakan di pasar yang berbeda. Jadi, bahkan di Atome, saya rasa sumber informasinya bisa saja berbeda, namun cara kerja modelnya bisa sangat mirip. Jadi, itulah bagian yang kami fokuskan pada skalabilitas, sedangkan sumber informasinya akan berbeda di berbagai negara. Jadi saya rasa itu adalah area yang dapat kami skalakan, namun ketika Anda melihat, tentu saja, mengelola risiko di berbagai pasar di Asia, sangat berbeda, misalnya, di pasar negara berkembang, kami harus memberikan lebih banyak perhatian pada penipuan, sedangkan di pasar negara maju, mungkin perhatian pada penipuan bisa sedikit lebih sedikit. Jadi, itulah nuansa yang kami lihat ketika kami pergi ke pasar yang berbeda.

(24:25) Jeremy Au:

Bisakah Anda berbagi tentang saat-saat dimana Anda secara pribadi merasa berani?

(24:27) Trasy Lou:

Ya. Ya. Terima kasih sudah menanyakan hal itu. Pastinya sangat sulit untuk memulai sebuah startup saat musim dingin pendanaan ketika semua orang, VC, pendiri, teman, keluarga meminta saya untuk tidak melakukannya, tetapi saya benar-benar melihat banyak manfaat dalam memulai startup di musim dingin pendanaan. Yang pertama adalah banyaknya talenta. Saya menemukan bahwa jauh lebih mudah untuk merekrut talenta-talenta hebat sekarang dibandingkan ketika semua orang benar-benar membangun perusahaan. Dan sekarang, sayangnya kita memiliki banyak sekali perusahaan teknologi yang sangat hebat di seluruh dunia, dan para talenta ini benar-benar ingin melakukan hal terbaik selanjutnya. Dan bagaimana cara kita menarik mereka untuk bergabung dengan perusahaan? Hal ini sangat penting, namun hal ini juga memposisikan kita di situasi saat ini, memposisikan kita di waktu yang lebih baik untuk menarik talenta-talenta ini untuk bergabung dengan perusahaan rintisan. Menurut saya itu nomor satu.

Hal lainnya adalah banyak startup hebat yang lahir dari musim dingin dan hal tersebut membuat para pendiri menjadi lebih berhati-hati atau disiplin dalam menggunakan dana dan benar-benar membuat keputusan yang matang tentang apa yang akan kita ambil selanjutnya. Jadi saya rasa ada banyak hal baik yang muncul dari musim dingin pendanaan ini. Dan saya percaya bahwa unicorn berikutnya atau seperti Amazon berikutnya akan benar-benar muncul dari pendanaan kali ini.

(25:38) Jeremy Au:

Saya akan mengatakan hal lain yang pernah kita bahas sebelumnya yang cukup berani adalah jika Anda memilih untuk menjadi seorang ibu dari tiga orang anak dan juga seorang pendiri. Jadi saya agak penasaran tentang bagaimana hal itu terjadi.

(25:49) Trasy Lou:

Ya, sangat menyenangkan. Sebenarnya, saya tidak bercanda di sini. Saya tahu kedengarannya sulit, tapi ini benar-benar luar biasa. Sebenarnya ada beberapa alasan mengapa atau bagaimana kami berhasil. Pertama, saya pikir sebagai pengusaha wanita, Anda harus memilih pasangan yang tepat dalam rumah tangga. Jadi, Anda harus memiliki suami yang sangat mendukung untuk benar-benar membuatnya berhasil. Jadi, dalam kasus saya, ketika saya bekerja di sebuah perusahaan, suami saya menjalankan startup atau perusahaannya sendiri. Dan sekarang tidak lagi, jadi saya merasa kami seperti bertukar peran. Dan kemudian dia berada dalam peran yang lebih stabil, di mana dia bisa menghabiskan lebih banyak waktu dengan keluarga, dengan anak-anak.

Anak-anak kami masih berusia tiga, lima dan tujuh tahun, masih sangat muda, tetapi kami benar-benar dapat bertukar peran dalam berbagai tahap kehidupan kami. Dan menurut saya, hal yang sangat penting bagi setiap pendiri wanita untuk merencanakan karier adalah merencanakannya bersama dengan pasangan. Dan saya rasa ini akan menjadi situasi yang sangat sulit ketika kedua pasangan, pasangan yang menjalankan bisnis mereka sendiri atau memiliki pekerjaan yang sangat menuntut, dan hal tersebut tidak akan baik untuk kesejahteraan anak-anak. Jadi, memilih mitra yang tepat akan menjadi penting dalam membangun bisnis Anda. Dan juga, saya rasa waktu juga sangat penting.

Alasan kedua mengapa saya pikir ini bagus adalah karena anak-anak saya sekarang berusia tiga, lima, tujuh tahun, dan Singapura memiliki sistem pendidikan yang sangat baik di mana anak-anak dapat bersekolah sepanjang hari setelah mereka berusia tiga atau empat tahun, sehingga tuntutan seorang ibu, menurut saya, berbeda. Tidak seperti kita harus tetap menyusui dan saya berniat untuk memulai bisnis ini ketika semua anak sudah lepas popok dan tidak menyusui. Dan juga ketika suami saya memiliki peran yang sedikit lebih stabil, jadi saya pikir sistem pendukung seperti itu sangat penting untuk dimiliki sebelum memulai bisnis sebagai pendiri perempuan, terutama sebagai seorang ibu.

(27:34) Jeremy Au:

Saya pikir, Anda tahu, ini bukan hanya untuk wanita, tapi juga untuk pria, bukan? Saya rasa banyak dari mereka yang cukup takut untuk membangun keluarga karena mereka tahu bahwa mereka adalah seorang pendiri, seperti, Anda tahu, sangat sibuk, Anda tidak bisa fokus pada keluarga Anda atau itu akan mengalihkan perhatian Anda dari pekerjaan Anda. Adakah nasihat untuk orang-orang yang, Anda tahu, agak menarik, apakah akan membangun sebuah keluarga atau tidak, atau apakah menjadi pendiri atau tidak dalam konteks membangun sebuah keluarga.

(27:54) Trasy Lou:

Menurut saya, saran saya, atau setidaknya dari pengalaman saya, adalah jangan terlambat memulainya. Saya rasa banyak dari kalian yang tahu, beberapa teman saya berpikir tentang hal ini dan kemudian merasa bahwa mungkin sudah terlambat untuk memiliki anak, terutama bagi para wanita. Saya percaya bahwa kita sebenarnya lebih kuat dari apa yang kita pikirkan dan selama kita disiplin dengan waktu kita, baik dengan manajemen waktu kita, saya percaya bahwa kita akan dapat melakukan keduanya, Anda tahu, memiliki sistem pendukung yang baik di rumah dan memilih pasangan yang tepat. Jadi, menurut saya, melihat karier saya, setelah MBA, saya beralih ke industri teknologi, dan kemudian saya juga cukup intens dalam mencari pasangan untuk membangun sebuah keluarga. Dan karena saya tahu bahwa saya berada di usia akhir 20-an, sebenarnya, jika Anda melihat waktu sekarang, saya juga memulai sedikit lebih awal, memiliki anak, tetapi saya menyukai waktunya karena sekarang anak-anak saya telah tumbuh dan inilah waktu saya untuk bersinar, Anda tahu, saya memiliki keluarga.

Saya punya anak, tapi di saat yang sama, saya juga membangun startup saya sendiri. Jadi saya pikir ketika anak-anak sudah mencapai usia tertentu, mereka bisa pergi ke sekolah sendiri dan itulah saat yang tepat untuk melakukannya. Tapi saya rasa untuk pria, kalian sedikit lebih fleksibel karena wanita yang harus melakukan tugas-tugas yang terkadang tidak bisa dibantu oleh pria. Tapi saya rasa memiliki keluarga membuat Anda lebih disiplin dan juga merencanakan ke depan dalam hal karir Anda dan bagaimana cara bekerja sama sebagai sebuah tim untuk menjadikannya benar-benar sukses.

(29:16) Jeremy Au:

Terima kasih banyak telah berbagi. Untuk itu, saya ingin meringkas tiga hal penting yang saya dapatkan dari percakapan ini. Pertama-tama, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang bagaimana rasanya menjadi GM di Uber dan Atome. Sangat menarik untuk mendengar saran Anda tentang bagaimana menjadi sukses dalam suatu pekerjaan, bagaimana pekerjaan itu harus diukur, dan juga apa saja dimensi kunci dari peluncuran pasar versus bertanggung jawab atas negara versus cara merekrut untuk tim negara. Pengalaman dan nasihat yang sangat menarik di sana.

Kedua, terima kasih banyak telah berbagi tentang Fluid dan apa yang Anda pikirkan tentang FinTech. Dan bagaimana rasanya membangun startup fintech selama musim dingin pendanaan? Dan juga banyak pengalaman tentang apa yang Anda pikirkan tentang mitos dan kesalahpahaman tentang peminjaman, manajemen risiko, dan juga saran pribadi Anda tentang bagaimana startup fintech harus melakukan penggalangan dana dan mempelajari apa yang perlu mereka pelajari untuk menjadi strategis dalam pendekatan mereka.

Terakhir, terima kasih telah berbagi tentang perjalanan pribadi Anda, baik sebagai, seperti yang Anda katakan, seorang GM yang sempat mengalami water break saat conference call, hingga menjadi seorang ibu dari tiga anak, tetapi juga memilih untuk menjadi seorang founder. Jadi, terima kasih atas percakapan yang sangat jujur itu. Saya suka dengan apa yang Anda katakan bahwa wanita lebih kuat dari yang mereka pikirkan. Dan saya rasa ada beberapa nasihat yang sangat bagus dan pribadi tentang bagaimana menjadi bijaksana tentang perencanaan keluarga, serta perencanaan karier, dan juga memilih untuk membangun sebuah startup baru berdasarkan hal tersebut.

Terima kasih banyak, Trasy, karena telah berbagi pengalaman Anda.

(30:33) Trasy Lou:

Terima kasih. Terima kasih telah mengundang saya, Jeremy. Senang sekali bisa berbagi pengalaman yang saya miliki dan semoga bermanfaat bagi orang-orang yang sedang berpikir untuk memulai sebuah perusahaan.